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gasmainlayer

pregnancy care and birthing cost etc.

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can anyone tell me the cost that i might have if i was to give birth in Oz, my hubby and i may be moving over for a 6 month period initially during which time i would be giving birth to my second child. I dont know if i will be eligiable for medicare and was wondering how expensive it would work out to be. I have looked at the medicare site but it doesnt say much about birthing costs, antenatal and post natal care. Any information would be gratefully received as it may be that this is a deciding factor in whether we go over or not.

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can anyone tell me the cost that i might have if i was to give birth in Oz, my hubby and i may be moving over for a 6 month period initially during which time i would be giving birth to my second child. I dont know if i will be eligiable for medicare and was wondering how expensive it would work out to be. I have looked at the medicare site but it doesnt say much about birthing costs, antenatal and post natal care. Any information would be gratefully received as it may be that this is a deciding factor in whether we go over or not.

 

Assuming you are covered by Medicare, and assuming you receive all your care via the public sector, it won't cost you anything


My Brain Hurts!

 

 

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There was something on here I read recently. Problem is I can't remember if was talking about Medicare or Private Insurance (or even something different again!) and a 1 year qualifying period .

Might be worth a search though.

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There was something on here I read recently. Problem is I can't remember if was talking about Medicare or Private Insurance (or even something different again!) and a 1 year qualifying period .

Might be worth a search though.

 

Private medical insurance usually has a 1 year waiting period for pre existing conditions


My Brain Hurts!

 

 

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If your husband is on a 457 visa (employer sponsored temporary visa) you won't qualify for Medicare which means you would have to have private healthcare. And like mentioned above you normally have to be a member for 12 months before you can claim.

 

So to be honest I would rather have the baby in the UK if I was you.

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If your husband is on a 457 visa (employer sponsored temporary visa) you won't qualify for Medicare.

 

 

Since when??

 

UK and AUs have recipricol health care agreement regardless of which visa your on.

 

I had medicare card for 457 & 417 both temporary visas.

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Since when??

 

UK and AUs have recipricol health care agreement regardless of which visa your on.

 

I had medicare card for 457 & 417 both temporary visas.

 

i looked at that site and it did imply that you would be covered for healthcare but wasnt sure if that meant pregnancy care too. will have to do some more searching i think.

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Since when??

 

UK and AUs have recipricol health care agreement regardless of which visa your on.

 

I had medicare card for 457 & 417 both temporary visas.

 

The Medicare site is not clear on a couple of points and the wording implies its only for ill health or injury. I thought it was for such situations as being on holiday, on a tourist visa etc, fall ill and need emergency medical treatment from seeing a GP to hospital care. If you are on a visa via work its a different set up, that is my understanding but am happy to be told I am mistaken :)

 

Pregnancy is pre existing, not an emergency or illness and if they are on a specfic visa it may mean they need to have specific health cover etc and do not qualify for the reciprocal agreement as they are resident in Aus, not just visiting per se.

 

The Medicare site says Reciprocal health care agreements cover treatment that is medically necessary. Medically necessary treatment means any ill-health or injury which occurs while you are in Australia and requires treatment before you return home.

 

Your entitlements

 

As a resident of one of these countries you are entitled to the following for any ill-health or injury requiring treatment while in Australia:

free treatment as a public in-patient or outpatient in a public hospital

subsidised medicines under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

Medicare benefits for out-of-hospital medical treatment provided by doctors through private surgeries and community health centres.

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The Medicare site is not clear on a couple of points and the wording implies its only for ill health or injury. I thought it was for such situations as being on holiday, on a tourist visa etc, fall ill and need emergency medical treatment from seeing a GP to hospital care. If you are on a visa via work its a different set up, that is my understanding but am happy to be told I am mistaken :)

 

Pregnancy is pre existing, not an emergency or illness and if they are on a specfic visa it may mean they need to have specific health cover etc and do not qualify for the reciprocal agreement as they are resident in Aus, not just visiting per se.

 

The Medicare site says Reciprocal health care agreements cover treatment that is medically necessary. Medically necessary treatment means any ill-health or injury which occurs while you are in Australia and requires treatment before you return home.

 

Your entitlements

 

As a resident of one of these countries you are entitled to the following for any ill-health or injury requiring treatment while in Australia:

free treatment as a public in-patient or outpatient in a public hospital

subsidised medicines under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme

Medicare benefits for out-of-hospital medical treatment provided by doctors through private surgeries and community health centres.

 

Information regarding Reciprocal Health Care on NHS website - "You’ll be treated as if you were a resident of the country in question."

 

Australia

Essential documents

Evidence of UK residence (e.g. NHS medical card or UK driving licence and temporary entry permit).

What's free

Public hospital treatment, including renal dialysis. You must arrange this before leaving the UK. Contact your NHS renal unit for further details.

What you'll need to pay for

 

 

  • Treatment at most doctors' surgeries.

  • Prescribed medicines.

  • Ambulance travel.

  • Dental treatment.

 

More information

You will need to enrol at a local Medicare office, but you can do this after you've had treatment. Some treatment charges may be partially refunded by the Medicare scheme. Try to make your claim while you're still in the country. http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Healthcareabroad/countryguide/NonEEAcountries/Pages/Non-EEAcountries.aspx

 

I had medicare card on 457 visa, the expire date on my medicare card was the same expire date of my visa.

 

"Subclass 457 visa holders who are not an eligible Australian

resident for Medicare benefit purposes and whose country does

not have a reciprocal health arrangement with Australia may be

eligible to obtain an exemption of the Medicare levy payment

in their tax return."

http://www.immi.gov.au/allforms/pdf/1066.pdf

 

 

Even If you have travel insurace, they will not pay the whole charge if you are entitled to reciprocal health care from that country. They will pay the difference.

 

And on the medicare site http://www.medicareaustralia.gov.au/public/migrants/visitors/uk.jsp#N10101

 

On the section medicare do not cover: does not mention pre-natal care nor giving birth in public hospital.

 

Pregnancy may be pre-existing to a degree, but your not pregnant forever! Is giving birth not medically nessassary treatment while being in Australia?

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I don't know the answers, hence me being hopeful someone would be along to clarify either way :cute: . I was trying to find out more info as well as was interested and what was written was limited and not really clear. TBH I'm still really none the wiser :eek: :laugh: but hopefully the OP is :biggrin: Its late, I'm tired :goofy:

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Not sure of this helps - I was on a spouse visa subclass 309 and gave birth in AU within 9 months of being there. I did not pay a dollar in medical costs.


"If you spend your whole life waiting for the storm, you'll never enjoy the sunshine"

 

 

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Having a baby definitely "requires treatment before you return home." and you are covered. :biggrin:

 

The 12 months thing was probably that private insurance requests that you join 12 months before the birth of your baby...note birth, not conception.

 

No knowledge of current accuracy but here is a great post off another forum that might help you:

 

Re: Having a baby on a 457 visa posted 15 mar 2011

 

Question:

 

 

We are relocating to Perth from the UK for a year starting in August. We will be on a 457 visa. Just discovered that my wife is pregnant.

 

Does anyone know if her care for having the baby will be covered under the reciprocal healthcare agreement - private no good as 12mth waiting period.

 

Any advice from recent experience of this situation would be gratefully received!

 

Answer:

 

Medicare will cover most things under the RHA such as appointments in a public hospital (all free), blood tests, hospitalisation for delivery and all that goes with it. Scans are not usually covered in full by Medicare so you will get a partial refund.

 

GP appointments (if you choose to go for shared care between hospital and GP for the pregnancy) will only be partially refunded unless bulk-billed (not all GP clinics offer that service for adults, most do for children).

 

You will also be entitled to free immunisation by council health services for bub, as well as free maternal health visits.

 

You will not be eligible for the baby bonus/ paid parental leave, or for any Family Assistance payments.

 

I have given birth both privately and in the public system here in Melbourne while on a 457 visa (to 2 different kids of course ). I can't comment on hospitals and pregancy care in Perth, but I had a very good experience in the public system here.

 

Good luck and congratulations on the pregnancy!

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Hi,

 

I'm de facto on my partners 457 visa and pregnant. medicare has covered part of my normal doctors appointment costs, scans and bloodtests and now all of my costs now I've been referred for proper ante natal care ( from about 25 weeks).

 

Hope this helps :)

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just to clarify, i received full ante natal and post natal care whilst i had a baby on a 457 visa. i was totally paranoid that I would not be able to receive care for free, but yes, you are covered if you are a UK citizen. not sure what visa you are coming on though. i did also have private health insurance BUT, did not want to pay the gap (the difference between what the insurance will pay back against the total bill). Public health care was great and i had an emergency c section, 3 days in a private room and plenty of after care including a great breast feeding clinic. if you are worried, call medicare. hope it helps. most public hospitals are great but be prepared to have some out of pocket expenses for scans and blood tests- these are not covered for anyone.

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