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Guest Hatton

Seychelles shark attack leaves Briton dead

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Guest Hatton

He lost an arm and suffered severe hip injuries whilst snorkelling on Tuesday in what was the second fatal shark attack in the same area this month.

No sharks attacks since 1962 in this area

 

The second this month :eek: A 36-year-old French tourist was killed by a shark off the same beach just over two weeks ago.

 

 

why the hell did they not ban swimming till this rouge shark was caught?

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14552788

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They hadn`t had a fatal shark attack since 1963 - it was probably thought that the one a few weeks before was a one off freak occurance. We had a death at our local beach a couple of years ago and if Im being honest once police opened up the beach again quite a few people were straight back in the water. I guess though it`s one thing to do something when you are aware of all possibilities but quite another if you have no idea. Feel very sorry for his wife and family.


The people who reach the top of the tree, are only those who haven`t got the qualifications to detain them at the bottom.

Peter Ustinov

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Guest Hatton
They hadn`t had a fatal shark attack since 1963 - it was probably thought that the one a few weeks before was a one off freak occurance. We had a death at our local beach a couple of years ago and if Im being honest once police opened up the beach again quite a few people were straight back in the water. I guess though it`s one thing to do something when you are aware of all possibilities but quite another if you have no idea. Feel very sorry for his wife and family.

 

I know, but Oz knows they have dangerous sharks and are seen quite often, they say this was a rouge shark that had come into the waters as climate change had made the waters cooler, if they knew there was a rouge shark in the waters they should have at least warned people which they did not, I also know shark deaths are very rare in Oz and the seychelles but Oz has spotters and nets which the Seychelles do not, a warning to this guy would have been nice,

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Guest guest37336

Tourism and the possible affects it would have on this region I imagine are to blame, the authorities would have seen it as a major problem how to deal with this, so best to keep the beaches open and hope it doesn't happen again.

 

Dreadfully sorry for the family involved, a truly horrific way to lose your life. In all probability it was/is a rougue shark, sometimes they hang around an area for some time, sometimes never seen again.

 

The risks of shark attack are minuscule but a tragedy when it happens. Let's hope there isn't a mass slaughter of all sharks after this event.

 

People unfortunately can become very blasé about what us in the ocean, we have to remember we are entering a kingdom we know little of and do indeed become part of a possible food chain when we venture into the deep blue.

 

Sensible precautions are needed at all times, and gen up on local areas and KNOW how to get out of possible trouble.

 

Cheers Tony.

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I know, but Oz knows they have dangerous sharks and are seen quite often, they say this was a rouge shark that had come into the waters as climate change had made the waters cooler, if they knew there was a rouge shark in the waters they should have at least warned people which they did not, I also know shark deaths are very rare in Oz and the seychelles but Oz has spotters and nets which the Seychelles do not, a warning to this guy would have been nice,

Like I said it`s one thing to go in to the water knowing all possible dangers - quite different going in blind. So yes people should have been warned that there had been a recent attack.


The people who reach the top of the tree, are only those who haven`t got the qualifications to detain them at the bottom.

Peter Ustinov

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Guest guest37336

Though shark, snake, spider, bites/attacks are extremely rare in Australia I always recommend any new arrivals to gen up on the possible dangers. I'm not talking of going into mass detail, but a peruse of many excellet books and websites will soon enough educate us.

 

Though unlikely it is always useful to know what to stay away from, what to in case of accident, (medical procedures etc) and all in all it will help us appreciate the wildlife of Australia (any country in fact) and enjoy it for what it is.

 

I guess I am very lucky in the fact that I love all wildlife (see anorak) and take a huge interest in all aspects so for those not that interested I guess it could be a bit of a chore, but better this than either putting yourself in danger or being scared to approach even the most innocent of wildlife.

 

Cheers Tony.

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Guest siamsusie
Though shark, snake, spider, bites/attacks are extremely rare in Australia I always recommend any new arrivals to gen up on the possible dangers. I'm not talking of going into mass detail, but a peruse of many excellet books and websites will soon enough educate us.

 

Though unlikely it is always useful to know what to stay away from, what to in case of accident, (medical procedures etc) and all in all it will help us appreciate the wildlife of Australia (any country in fact) and enjoy it for what it is.

 

I guess I am very lucky in the fact that I love all wildlife (see anorak) and take a huge interest in all aspects so for those not that interested I guess it could be a bit of a chore, but better this than either putting yourself in danger or being scared to approach even the most innocent of wildlife.

 

Cheers Tony.

 

 

Yes Tony I love all wild life myself:huh:

 

 

spidercrabroom.jpg

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I'm no expert !

but i fish once a month with a charter skipper who also does shark netting around the Sydney area. He has told me that when a shark attack happens lots of boats go out to catch the animal but this is a waste of time a sharks cover such a massive distance that the shark is well gone before the fishers are out trying to catch them.

I know there will be lots of objections here (and know breeds like Bull sharks keep a territory) but on the whole the number of attacks compared to the number of bathers make for pretty good odds that your safe.

I have seen sharks myself (though not great whites or Bull sharks) when snorkelling and a couple of times a year the beach alarms go off as a warning and the helicopters come in to scare off any potential threats.

But the odds that you are safe are high.

two attacks are worrying but trust the "experts" with their judgment if they say things are safe.

IMHO, i'm more likley to be hit by a car on the way to the beach than hurt once in the water (as long as i respect the water).

The life guard service here in OZ is superb and they do not take chances with the public’s health.


Steve, Cath & Maddie: Job offer 1/2/11, 457 started 1/3/09, NSW nursing reg completed 1/11/09, Meds 5/1/10, 457 approved 3/3/10, Were here 29/7/2010: Off again :eek: EN 856 meds taken 24/1/11, 856 app submitted 28/3/11, 8/5/11 Perm Res Granted

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Guest AnubisUK

The risks of shark attack are minuscule but a tragedy when it happens. Let's hope there isn't a mass slaughter of all sharks after this event.

 

People unfortunately can become very blasé about what us in the ocean, we have to remember we are entering a kingdom we know little of and do indeed become part of a possible food chain when we venture into the deep blue.

.

 

Couldn't agree more with this! Although I'd change your original statement to why do any sharks at all have to be slaughtered??? Firstly, I do want to say that I have nothing but the utmost sympathy for the family of the man that was killed, and particularly his wife, as I can't even begin to imagine what it must be like to lose someone under such tragic circumstances. :(

 

But at the same time it makes me blood boil when you see this kind of story. Someone gets killed or seriously injured by a shark or bear, and straight away people are gunning for the animal involved. What right do we have to kill these animals when it's us that are invading their natural habitat, not the other way around? :mad:

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Guest Hatton
Couldn't agree more with this! Although I'd change your original statement to why do any sharks at all have to be slaughtered??? Firstly, I do want to say that I have nothing but the utmost sympathy for the family of the man that was killed, and particularly his wife, as I can't even begin to imagine what it must be like to lose someone under such tragic circumstances. :(

 

But at the same time it makes me blood boil when you see this kind of story. Someone gets killed or seriously injured by a shark or bear, and straight away people are gunning for the animal involved. What right do we have to kill these animals when it's us that are invading their natural habitat, not the other way around? :mad:

 

Totally agree, although I was terribly sorry for the young kid who was killed by a polar bear last week i was also upset that the bear was killed, we are in THEIR Territory and all bets are off.

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Though shark, snake, spider, bites/attacks are extremely rare in Australia I always recommend any new arrivals to gen up on the possible dangers. I'm not talking of going into mass detail, but a peruse of many excellet books and websites will soon enough educate us.

 

Though unlikely it is always useful to know what to stay away from, what to in case of accident, (medical procedures etc) and all in all it will help us appreciate the wildlife of Australia (any country in fact) and enjoy it for what it is.

 

I guess I am very lucky in the fact that I love all wildlife (see anorak) and take a huge interest in all aspects so for those not that interested I guess it could be a bit of a chore, but better this than either putting yourself in danger or being scared to approach even the most innocent of wildlife.

 

Cheers Tony.

 

Totally agree as it's one of the thing we feel needs to be done when we arrive - we did notice on some programme we watched that there are centre's over in Oz to help identify dangerous beasties & plants etc and as newbies wouldn't have a clue

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I've been studying my bugs and animals since we decided to move lol still got loads to learn!

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I've been studying my bugs and animals since we decided to move lol still got loads to learn!

 

At least no more midges lol (or at least I hope so)

 

Same here and as you say loads to learn - all part of the experience :)

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Guest guest37336

I have yet to visit a country with a more diverse range of flora and fauna in my life,:notworthy:.

 

I was very fortunate to go to the Cloud Forests of Costa Rica, and allegedly this area of the world has more insect/reptile life than anywhere else on earth with the exception of the Amazon, guess what I saw?

 

DIDDLY SQUAT, and I WAS looking all the time. Just goes to show that even the most hostile of environs can be devoid of nature unless you know exactly where to look.:unsure:

 

But one thing that draws me back time and again to Australia is the wildlife, bugger the ocean views, pools and the like, stick me in the outback or rainforest lifting stones, logs and the like and you won't find a happier man on gods green earth.

 

Cheers Tony.

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Guest Hatton
At least no more midges lol (or at least I hope so)

 

Same here and as you say loads to learn - all part of the experience :)

 

Midges are replaced by bloody flies though :mad: they really are intelligent buggers in Oz and attack while you are carrying a tray full of drinks.

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When i went to florida i thought oh maybe ill see a racoon etc lol but i only saw these big strange looking birds that went around the villas looking for food and some geckos. All the rest were in the zoo!! oh and some squirrels too!

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Guest Hatton
When i went to florida i thought oh maybe ill see a racoon etc lol but i only saw these big strange looking birds that went around the villas looking for food and some geckos. All the rest were in the zoo!! oh and some squirrels too!

 

Stacy, before you go to Oz come to Cornwall and you will see Dolphins, Whales and if you go to Bodmin Moor :notworthy:

http://www.photofilecornwall.co.uk/

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yep i will! I said to dave last night about moving down near cornwall if we dont go to oz but he said theres not enough work down there for him. but ill get down there for a holiday if we dont go, been meaning to go for ages. I've never ever saw a dolphin in the wild in the UK, i was meant to go upto moray firth when i was little but i ended up misbehaving and my mum and dad wouldnt take me LOL

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Guest guest37336
When i went to florida i thought oh maybe ill see a racoon etc lol but i only saw these big strange looking birds that went around the villas looking for food and some geckos. All the rest were in the zoo!! oh and some squirrels too!

 

We had an eventful time with a Raccoon once Stacey.

 

Was in Caye Caulker (fishing again,:embarrassed:) once and laying on the bed when a Raccoon walked in and started to drink out of the toilet, now it was a shack believe me, no mod cons, except for a VERY basic loo and tiny 'kitchenette' and would this bloody raccoon move, oh no.

 

Every time I went near it it snarled and seriously growled, after about two hours I managed to persuade it off with some milk, but this was a regular event at the camp I was staying and no one dare go to near the bloody thing, ruled the island in actual fact.:biglaugh:

 

Cheers Tony.

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Guest Hatton
yep i will! I said to dave last night about moving down near cornwall if we dont go to oz but he said theres not enough work down there for him. but ill get down there for a holiday if we dont go, been meaning to go for ages. I've never ever saw a dolphin in the wild in the UK, i was meant to go upto moray firth when i was little but i ended up misbehaving and my mum and dad wouldnt take me LOL

 

If you come down book one of these trips.

 

http://www.kingharryscornwall.co.uk/frl/orca/wildlife

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lol yeah i heard those racoons can be crazy! i loved those big birds that came round the villa, i'll put a pic of one up in a sec. if you fed them once they remembered which villas had fed them and came round every day and started making their weird noises till you came out lol

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Guest guest37336

Just been announced on BBC that two shark attacks have taken place off the coast of Russia, well when I say Russia it is the far east of the country, not what some would imagine is the harsh wintery Russia that some know.

 

 

http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/teenager-hurt-in-second-russian-shark-attack/story-e6frfku0-1226117669556

 

 

 

This attack is more than likely associated with the sharks natural hunting instincts and chasing baitfish into the shallow regions. The identity of the shark has yet to be established, but there are suggestions it 'could' be a Great White,:idea:

 

Just goes to show that no country is immune to this type of thing, even the north and south poles have the 'potential' for a shark attack.

 

I know, no real use to anyone on here, but thought it may interest a few is all.

 

Cheers Tony.:wink:

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Guest guest37336

I know also very boring, but being an anorak this sort of thing fascinates me.

 

It is often said that Australia has more dangerous species of snake than any other country in the world, which is true, but on a global scale the number of fatalities from snake bite in Australia pale into insignificance compared to some countries.

 

India for example has between 20,000 and 30,000 deaths per annum from snake bite, :shocked:, and this figure could well be a lot higher as many seek medical advice from local traditional healers and no records are kept of such meetings.

 

But that figure is truly gob smacking, that is one hell a lot of people who loose their lives through snake bite.

 

Cheers Tony.:wink:

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Im never watching jaws again lol jk. Poor people, hope they dont try and kill lots of sharks tho

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Im never watching jaws again lol jk. Poor people, hope they dont try and kill lots of sharks tho

 

Although a brilliant film Stacey it did NO favours to the shark population.

 

Peter Benchley who wrote the book is know an active member of several shark protection organizations, I know a bit like kettle and black, but at least he realised the damage his film did and is now trying to make amends for it,:notworthy:

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