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Guest julieb

Hi, schools in australia for autistic spectrum

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Guest julieb

Hi everyone, completely no idea what I am doing or what button to press, so bear with me on this one.

Im married with twin 6 year old boys who have very mild aspergers syndrome and dyspraxia (high functioning autistic). Very unhappy with the english schools and way of life for children and families with this problem. Heard a lot of good reports about schools in Australia and understanding for autistic children but have no idea which area is best to look in. My husband is motor mechanic and train mantainer and can do carpentry so hopefully will have a chance if we apply. So is there anyone out there who has similiar situation with children to me or knows anyone who can give me some advise please.

Im trying to find out a town or part of Australia which would suit my children the best. Anyone moved there and have child or children in school with similiar problems or at least a school with english accent children would help. Im already worried they wont be able to handle the move! Best regard Julie

 

:wacko: :arghh: :spinny:

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Guest __TJ__

no help im afraid but bumping this thread as we have an 8yo with aspies and im after infor as well.

i can just imagine jack telling them all they are not "speaking properly" LOL

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Guest __TJ__

woudl statementing cause a prob then? the school want to get our boy statemented and so far we are going along with it but first meeting is tomorrow, do we try and talk them out of it?

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A child with a disability could pose a problem to getting a visa - it all depends on the potential cost to the tax payer of providing for that child. It does seem that children with Aspergers Syndrome are managing to get through but children with Autism, because of their generally higher needs, are more likely to be knocked back. The tendency seems to be that if they are in a special school they are more likely to be knocked back.

 

Generally children with Aspergers Syndrome would not be in a special school - in some states they wouldnt necessarily get any additional support at all if they were high functioning unless maybe their behaviour was a problem. Some states, like NSW have special schools run by the Autism Association but in general the children who get into those schools are children with Autism and not Aspergers - you would have to wonder whether you would want to put a high functioning child with Aspergers into a group of children with Autism who could potentially be non verbal with very stereotyped behaviours.

 

Most states have supported integration but it isnt always great - it could be an hour or two a day but very rarely full time support, and that would most likely be the support of a teacher's aide. Some states, like Victoria are particularly strict about the eligibility and many children with Aspergers get no additonal support at all.

 

If you do get a visa and have a child with a disability, bring along all the reports you have - a clear statement of diagnosis is important (try and get a diagnosis of one of the Pervasive Developmental Disorders by name, not just ASD because the diagnosis can be important as to the likely level of support or placement options) and it needs to be backed up by appropriate objective assessments if you possibly can - this is increasingly important. Bring along also an IQ test, a test of adaptive behaviour from their current school, any skills assessments and any IEPs.

 

I thought UK actually had some High Schools for children with Aspergers Syndrome - I vaguely recall seeing a brochure about one at least at an expo in London a few years ago. AFAIK we dont have any although some states may have units which may have kids with Aspergers in them. If you talk to the parents of children with any of the Pervasive Developmental Disorders they will usually say that their kids are not getting enough support, no matter how much support they get and that is, unfortunately, a result of finite resources and an increasing cohort of children with a disability label.

 

Good luck with it!

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Guest nicola123

Hi Michele

 

I spoke to some people at coventry on Saturday as my 11 year old has aspergers and is in main stream school and they were certain there would't be a problem with medicals. so a bit more reassurance for you

Nicola

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Guest John&Christine

Why would a statement necercerally cause a problem with a visa application?

 

As Julieb and any other parent with a child with a statement will know is that it sets out there Childs problems and educational and non educational needs that will be provided usually by the councils education department. A statement can say as little or as much help of any kind that is needed ranging from "child A needs some help with reading" to "child A needs constant supervision all day and help going to the toilet and feeding" A statement is not something to be feared and if it is written properly can really help your child get a suitable education.

To be told that a statement will affect a visa application is in my opinion a sweeping generalization and sounds to me like someone not knowing what they are talking about.

 

Saying that you still may not get the same level of help you receive in the UK.

 

As for TJ it was one of the best things we did for our son, don’t be put off as a statement is a legally binding document and you can use it to your Childs advantage to get the provision put in place for your Child a well worded statement is a good thing.

I agree with almost everything Quol says apart from the finite resources, that can be overcome by having whatever it is needed written into the statement and quantified.

 

My opinion comes from that of a parent of a deaf child and we have gone through the statement process.

 

John.

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John - my remarks about finite resources were actually referring to the way things are done in Australia - it would be great if we had a scheme which expanded the budget according to the needs of the children but AFAIK all the states have a fixed special ed budget which has to accommodate all the kids who are identified. If statementing is budget independent then I think that is a terrific way to go.

 

I agree with you too - I dont think statementing per se is the issue rather it is the extent of the support which is required that is the issue when applying for a visa.

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Guest John&Christine
John - my remarks about finite resources were actually referring to the way things are done in Australia - it would be great if we had a scheme which expanded the budget according to the needs of the children but AFAIK all the states have a fixed special ed budget which has to accommodate all the kids who are identified. If statementing is budget independent then I think that is a terrific way to go.

 

I agree with you too - I dont think statementing per se is the issue rather it is the extent of the support which is required that is the issue when applying for a visa.

 

 

Ahh..... Sorry about that...

 

It always comes down to a budgets somewhere along the line and I am sure there are fixed budgets here as well, it's just when you get something written into a statement the council have to find the money to pay for it from somewhere even if that means making a cut elsewhere.

 

John.

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Hi, This is a problem close to our heart.

We lived in Brisbane and have 3 Australian born kids, one of whom is autistic but also high functioning.

We found the level of support for him in mainstreaming (normal classroom situation) was hopeless, only 20 minutes one on one a day. After contacting Qld education and other sate education authorities we found that 20 minutes a day appears to be about the maximum one on one help in most schools and states.

Our experience was not good, in fact we left Australia because of this and returned to the UK where the help has been fantastic....... But having said this we had a particularly bad school in Brisbane when it came to attitudes towards mainstreaming kids. The headmaster was very unco-operative and even refused a free advisory visit (paid for by us) from Autism Queensland, the only school to ever refuse one.

 

I think one would be extremely lucky to receive a similar level of support available in the UK but most people who we have contacted in Oz have said that, in part because the budget is limited, it is more a case of finding a good school with teachers (especially the head) who express a genuine interest in helping your children.

 

Many schools in Queensland have Special Educational Units where all the kids with greater learning difficulties go. The ability levels vary tremendously and kids are normally taught in groups so it is difficult to know at what level a child would be taught. The problem is when you have a higher functioning child who could greatly benefit from being in a mainstream classroom the support is not really there.

I have to say the SEUs in many schools are good, some very good, so it might not be a problem for some special needs kids.

 

Another problem may be in getting someone with personal experience of good schools to tell you about them. If their child is doing well and receiving greater support than other special needs kids in other schools they might not want to advertise the fact that their school is one of the better ones.

 

We would love to return to Australia as it is a great country, and it does cost the state a lot of money to provide support for them. We'll keep looking for good schools and hope that that things change in Australia for SN kids in mainstreamed classroom education.

I hope you find a wonderful school for your children.

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Guest Lexi Lexi

Queensland has better support than NSW so if you are planing to move, chose Brisbane, Jindalee State School has a very good SEU. Other wise around the same are there is more schools with support classes

Good luck

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[

We found the level of support for him in mainstreaming (normal classroom situation) was hopeless, only 20 minutes one on one a day. After contacting Qld education and other sate education authorities we found that 20 minutes a day appears to be about the maximum one on one help in most schools and states.

Our experience was not good, in fact we left Australia because of this and returned to the UK where the help has been fantastic....... But having said this we had a particularly bad school in Brisbane when it came to attitudes towards mainstreaming kids. The headmaster was very unco-operative and even refused a free advisory visit (paid for by us) from Autism Queensland, the only school to ever refuse one.

 

I think one would be extremely lucky to receive a similar level of support available in the UK but most people who we have contacted in Oz have said that, in part because the budget is limited, it is more a case of finding a good school with teachers (especially the head) who express a genuine interest in helping your children.

 

 

 

Having taught children with special needs both in the UK and here in Aus I would say that the provision is worlds apart - UK know what they're doing, there is a high level of expertise within the general teaching population and IEPs and inclusion programmes are expected and assessed as part of the OFSTED inspections and department monitoring. Here I have been in both state and private schools and the knowledge and implementation of indivualised learning plans is pitiful. Teachers quite often, even when they do have any kind of support, have not been taught how to utilise it so it's wasted and wrongly directed. I know someone whose child is a very bright Asperger's child but has extreme problems in a classroom setting and she has had to fight tooth and nail to get him support and to stop the school excluding him! I know someone in my children's school, whose son had a statement which was ignored when they got here (SA) and they had to have him reassessed, but even when diagnosed as ASD the teachers still believed he was just naughty and the school asked her to remove him!

 

I don't mean to paint a bleak picture but as a teacher I am quite disillusioned with the educational system here. I think my kids would have done better academically if we'd stayed in the UK - having said that we all love may aspects of living here and the opportunities for kids socially and in extra-curricular terms is great and the kids here are very confident, so it's swings and roundabouts.

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Guest guest30038

This thread is 3 yr old but just to disagree with the last poster in case someone needing help for an autistic child gets the impression that the whole system is backwards :rolleyes:

 

My child gets an IEP every term and had done since his first year at primary. The support we have received has been excellent in both state primary and high school private. I have had many foster chidren with special/high needs and have not found any of their schools lacking in this area.

 

Please read here to see how "special" my son's school is.: http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/news-gossip-chat/95160-just-want-share.html

 

kev

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[

 

Having taught children with special needs both in the UK and here in Aus I would say that the provision is worlds apart - UK know what they're doing, there is a high level of expertise within the general teaching population and IEPs and inclusion programmes are expected and assessed as part of the OFSTED inspections and department monitoring. Here I have been in both state and private schools and the knowledge and implementation of indivualised learning plans is pitiful.

 

 

Would that view be due to your own experience eg maybe a good school/situation in the UK and a poor one in Aus or is a more widespread concern and that on average Australia is lagging behind in this area?

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Interestingly when I was at my school in the UK I didn't consider it a great one - it was in a low socio-economic area and had an inadequate head - however it was a school where all the teaching staff worked hard, we had a high percentage of special needs and a good inclusion programme. We were expected to keep abreast of current teaching methods, marking theories and to use a differentiated approach as much as possible.

 

Here I have seen very little differentiation, poor assessment, lack of skills in dealing with SEN and other worrying practices. The level of learning seems lower than in the UK, marking is very hit and miss and is not used so much as a feedback or ongoing assessment tool. One expensive provate primary school I worked at had pretty much abandoned teaching science at year six because the staff didn't like doing it. When I worked with a class for one day a week for a term I found there to be minimal resources, a scheme of work based around the UK SATs scheme (so that bit was okay!) and the kids' exercise books hadn't been marked once that whole year! How could that teacher be writing so and so is very confident at doing such and such (which he was doing)??!! Recently I was covering a year 12 history class and happened to notice the kids were using a UK GCSE text book - so in no way equivalent to A'Level (not even first year).

 

I have a number of friends who have lectured here and in Europe and they all say that standards here are much lower. But the anomaly is that later, that gap seems to close in some subjects as a physio friend of mine says that Aussie medical people are well-respected internationally and very proficient!

 

I am glad to hear others having a positive experience with SEN provision.

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If anyone is looking for a mainstream school that is really exceptional and provides a wonderful environment for all children including those on the autistic spectrum SOR Perth then PM me and I'll tell you about the school my DS goes to.

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Hi everyone

My eldest boy who is 13 has aspergers and were currently appealing his statement here in uk. My OH is aussie and desperate to go home to melbourne, so I'm tentatively thinking about it. Does anyone know anything about schools in Ferntree Gully area. I know they're building a new autism school there but it will probably be too late for my son who is due to choose his options this year. He is adamant that he'll never get in a plane...anyone had similar problems? Be glad for any advice.

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Hi jules2409, We are thinking of moving to perth area (from scotland) & my son has "mild traits on the autistic spectrum" but not actually diagnosed with any specifics as he doesnt have enough traits , severe enough (bla bla) Anyway he has obviously always mainstreamed with a little extra help in the classroom. His education (he's just finished primary 6 here & away to turn 11) is a concern for me so if you could provide that details of the school your son goes to & the area your in that would be very much appreciated. (I cant seem to pm you)

Thanks in advance.

 

Lynn .

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If anyone is looking for a mainstream school that is really exceptional and provides a wonderful environment for all children including those on the autistic spectrum SOR Perth then PM me and I'll tell you about the school my DS goes to.

 

Hi Lady Rainicorn

I'm trying to send you a private PM from a post a few years back but it won't let me - would you mind sending me a message so i can get in touch. I just have a question for you but nothing to do with this thread. Thanks

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Hi Lady Rainicorn

I'm trying to send you a private PM from a post a few years back but it won't let me - would you mind sending me a message so i can get in touch. I just have a question for you but nothing to do with this thread. Thanks

 

Sorted my PM's out if you wanted to

try again.

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Guest

My PM's are sorted now if you want to try again.

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