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Guest BillyJ

Working on a Bridging Visa while aplying for Subclass 820

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Guest BillyJ

Hi all,

 

Currently applying for a Partner Visa.

 

My partner was offered to relocate back to Sydney with a major bank. As my job was floundering we decided to grab the opportunity.

 

I arrived in Australia in March 2011 on a 3 month tourist Visa then submitted my application (subclass 820) in Sydney around the 10th of that month. I received an email acknowledgement the money had been taken and they were starting the process.

 

**Would arriving on a visitor visa and then applying for the partner visa straight away work negatively against me?**

 

As yet I haven't had any further correspondence, only to confirm a change of address (Which I had to chase). As I understand the average waiting time is now around 9 months, something I hadn't originally anticipated. I have enquired about working on the Bridging Visa I am now on. I have emailed twice but not had anything back

 

**Can anyone tell me the conditions on working on a Bridging Visa, as they appear to be a bit vague on the forms I have read. It just uses the language "Under exceptional circumstances". (I would have thought 9 months out of work for anyone would have been exceptional circumstanceswink.gif).**

 

Currently one salary is supporting us, we are housesitting so no rent. There will be a time soon when we will have to find somewhere to rent. I have savings in the UK and Singapore so I guess any decision on allowing me to work is based on this? My savings are for a house deposit thoughsad.gif. I'd be happy to pick up some work to tied me over.

 

Any advice would be much appreciated.

 

Regards,

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A bridging visa has the same conditions as the visa you were on previously. So if a tourist visa, you cant work!

 

You can apply for work rights but it's not something I would do if applying for a spouse visa. As you know your partner has to say how he can support you in Australia.

IMO (others may disagree) If you say he can in the forms then you rock up and say well actually he cant I need work rights it might not look so good.


05/09/09 Mailed my 309/100 app 17/09/09 CO 05/10/09 Meds 08/10/09 PCC 09/10/09 Xray, 18/12/09 Extra Medical report recieved by CO 14/01/10 Hep B test, 09/02/10 New CO aggh 18/02/10 309, Baby visa needed now for our move in Sept 2011

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Good point shel - OP, in order to apply for work rights in your scenario you have to prove that you in are financial hardship; and in order to apply for a partner visa, you have to prove that your partner has enough resources to support you....so you're in a bit of a catch 22.

 

In terms of whether it works against you, it is really a misuse of the immigration system to come into the country claiming to be on holidays and then to apply for migration, but plenty of people seem to do it that way so I'm sure they have seen it before.

 

Good luck!


applied for 309/100 19/1/10, 309 VISA GRANTED 28/4 - arrived Sydney 4/2/11, second stage visa app lodged Jan 2012, PR visa (100) GRANTED 7/6/12, now waiting for babywellie to come join us!:biggrin:

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Guest Tillyloola

 

**Would arriving on a visitor visa and then applying for the partner visa straight away work negatively against me?**

 

 

**Can anyone tell me the conditions on working on a Bridging Visa, as they appear to be a bit vague on the forms I have read. It just uses the language "Under exceptional circumstances". (I would have thought 9 months out of work for anyone would have been exceptional circumstanceswink.gif).**

 

 

For your first question, it might, you have breached your visa conditions as your intent was to lodge your application when you arrived in the country. You may get away with it, you may not. People do it and do seem to get away with it, but then others don't. Its really down to how closely your CO follows the rules.

 

Second question. You have to prove financial hardship to apply for exceptional circumstances, which if you have savings you can't prove this as you can support yourself (they wont care that its ear marked for something else). Also your partner works and as others have said, there is an expectation by the DIAC that they will support you. If you say they can't, then you may be walking down a tricky road for your visa grant. I myself wouldn't walk down that road because for all the problems it may solve, it may throw up worse, but thats a decision for you alone.

 

I do wish you the best of luck.

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Guest Roary

I just noticed this and might be able to help. I entered Australia on a working holiday visa and was granted a bridging visa that DID allow me to work. This may be because the working holiday one allowed me to work, so the bridging visa would as well. It also allowed me to leave the country. I was very straight up with them: I told them exactly what had happened (I had entered to live with my partner on the WH visa) and they were fine, and I think even added the multiple leaving/returns on to the visa.

 

To be honest I'd be tempted to call them and explain your situation but do it in terms of that you'd LIKE to work as you are a person who has always had a job, and you think it is important in career terms blah blah (so you are NOT saying you need the money, thus avoiding the catch-22) and ask. If they say no, they say no, but I can't see how it would negatively impact the overall application.

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Guest Roary

(just to clarify: I applied for a De Facto spouse visa). The onshore processing times are deliberately slower to make it less advantageous to apply on shore.

 

I was granted my visa but we let it lapse when we returned to the UK for my work (which was a mistake as we're applying again, but that's another story!)

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Guest Stacey Coombes
I just noticed this and might be able to help. I entered Australia on a working holiday visa and was granted a bridging visa that DID allow me to work. This may be because the working holiday one allowed me to work, so the bridging visa would as well. It also allowed me to leave the country. I was very straight up with them: I told them exactly what had happened (I had entered to live with my partner on the WH visa) and they were fine, and I think even added the multiple leaving/returns on to the visa.

 

To be honest I'd be tempted to call them and explain your situation but do it in terms of that you'd LIKE to work as you are a person who has always had a job, and you think it is important in career terms blah blah (so you are NOT saying you need the money, thus avoiding the catch-22) and ask. If they say no, they say no, but I can't see how it would negatively impact the overall application.

 

 

Very interesting, thank you.

 

Stacey

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Hi Stacey,

welcome to poms in oz! This is a very old thread, rather than bumping it up with the recent posts, you would probably be better off clicking the 'like' button at the end of the thread. :-)

if you are having issues yourself with a bridging visa feel free to start your own thread. Things can change quite a lot to do with immigration in over a year, especially time lines.


Has two beautiful Aussie little girls :-)

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Guest GeorgeD

Hi Stacey,

 

Welcome to Poms In Oz!

 

As Blossom79 has said, this is an old thread and the OP hasn't ever come back to it. I'm going to lock the thread, but feel free to createa new thread if you have any questions to ask or need any advice.

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