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Guest Guest 47403

Teachers strike yesterday?

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Guest Guest 47403

My daughters school decided that only half the teachers would strike so the school could stay open probably not what the unions would have wanted but meant parents were not having to take days off work.

 

Was anyone effected by having to take time off work? All the lollipop men and ladies were in there usual haunts on the way to work, just wondering if the strike had the desired effect.

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My childrens schools were both closed, but....get this.....the dinner ladies still had to go in!!! whats that all about??!!


Steve 47, Lisa 39, 2 Kids 16 + 11

PR VISA GRANTED July 09 , Validated Visa Nov 09. Living in Adelaide

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Guest Andy
My daughters school decided that only half the teachers would strike so the school could stay open probably not what the unions would have wanted but meant parents were not having to take days off work.

 

Was anyone effected by having to take time off work? All the lollipop men and ladies were in there usual haunts on the way to work, just wondering if the strike had the desired effect.

My two youngest were off school yesterday, it's funny because i am really split about these strike's, i kind of thought at the start of the week that they had a point and good luck to them, then i got chatting to a cafe owner in London who was furious about it and was of the opinion that a big chunk of private sector workers have suffered over the last couple of years and had to make sacrifice's and take the pain so why should the public sector workers not share the burden and that made me think that he has a point :wacko:

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Dinner ladies are not affected by pensions.

 

Have a read of this thats floating around FB and you might see it a little differently....

 

'Stand up to the government and support the strikes..... Remember when teachers, nurses, doctors and lollipop ladies crashed the stock market, wiped out banks, took billions in bonuses and paid no tax? No, me neither. Please copy and paste to your status for 24 hours to show your support for the strikes against the government's latest attack on pensions.'

 

The proposal is for them to pay more into their pension contributions each month and work for more years, then get less out of the pot at the end. How does that work? A treble whammy? Are the PM's doing this? Are the ones in parliament who have scr*wed the tax payers out of millions sacrificing anything? What about all the money that is spent on wars etc?

 

I totally agree with the strikes, I think its terrible what they are proposing.


"If you spend your whole life waiting for the storm, you'll never enjoy the sunshine"

 

 

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My two youngest were off school yesterday, it's funny because i am really split about these strike's, i kind of thought at the start of the week that they had a point and good luck to them, then i got chatting to a cafe owner in London who was furious about it and was of the opinion that a big chunk of private sector workers have suffered over the last couple of years and had to make sacrifice's and take the pain so why should the public sector workers not share the burden and that made me think that he has a point :wacko:

 

This is how the press divide and conquer.

My old man retired a few years ago, but aged 60i sh there was a huge hit to pensions as shares took a tumble, meaning his pot was around 25% smaller. The market can go up as well as down etc.

 

 

This front page here has some telling information on the "gold plated" pensions of teachers. Note which job has the largest average pension...

 

http://liberalconspiracy.org/2011/06/29/excellent-indy-front-page-compares-public-pensions-to-mps/

 

Another excuse the government use is that 'the country can't afford it'.

But figures in the Hutton Report show that the cost of these pensions peaked in 2010/11, but will go down year on year for the next few decades - from 1.9% of GDP last year to 1.2% in a few years time.

 

http://blogs.channel4.com/factcheck/factcheck-are-public-sector-pensions-unaffordable/7138

 

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Business/Public-Sector-Pensions-Affordability-Row-Hutton-Report-Shows-Payouts-As-Percentage-Of-GDP-Will-Fall/Article/201106416021762?f=rss

 

So in a nutshell, there is no pain to share - the pensions cost the same as they always did, and are in fact costing less each year.

How would you feel Andy if your suppliers told you the cost of your bits over the last 20 years had now been changed, and they wanted you to pay them an extra 5% on top of everything that you've already paid for those goods?


"An inspirational leader...exceptionally enthusiastic, committed and motivated" OFSTED 2014.

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Guest guest37336

The trouble is that the press/media often put things out that I have no idea if truthful or not. There was a discussion on the radio yesterday that a teacher who had been in the profession for thirty years and paid basic salary of £32,000 per annum would receive a pension of £500,000 after retirement.

 

I have no idea if this is true, but the facts and figures put about do at times make it very confusing, you're (I) am never to sure who to believe anymore.

 

Cheers Tony.

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Guest Guest 47403
The trouble is that the press/media often put things out that I have no idea if truthful or not. There was a discussion on the radio yesterday that a teacher who had been in the profession for thirty years and paid basic salary of £32,000 per annum would receive a pension of £500,000 after retirement.

 

I have no idea if this is true, but the facts and figures put about do at times make it very confusing, you're (I) am never to sure who to believe anymore.

 

Cheers Tony.

 

You must have been listening to the same radio station as me Tony.

 

I must admit I'm not sure where my support lies regarding strikes I think unions in general do a good job of looking after there workers but strikes seem a little outdated I wish my company would recognise a union it might of enabled us to have a pay rise during the last 2 years.

 

I think the reason my daughters school decided to have just half the teachers striking was they had a teacher training day yesterday so it would have meant 2 days off school for the kids.

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Guest guest37336
You must have been listening to the same radio station as me Tony.

 

I must admit I'm not sure where my support lies regarding strikes I think unions in general do a good job of looking after there workers but strikes seem a little outdated I wish my company would recognise a union it might of enabled us to have a pay rise during the last 2 years.

 

I think the reason my daughters school decided to have just half the teachers striking was they had a teacher training day yesterday so it would have meant 2 days off school for the kids.

 

 

Hi matey.

 

It all got a bit confusing at the end of the day,:goofy:. Whilst I agree that unions have their place in todays society I 'think' the days of 'All Out' have gone.

 

I totally agree that all those in the work place should have someone to fight their cause/concerns, otherwise we are on dangerous ground. I just wish that at times instead of point scoring off each other both sides of the debate realised that the 'vast' majority of us just want to see fairness is all, sometimes the vitriol from both sides does no good in the long run.

 

Cheers Tony.:wink:

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The trouble is that the press/media often put things out that I have no idea if truthful or not. There was a discussion on the radio yesterday that a teacher who had been in the profession for thirty years and paid basic salary of £32,000 per annum would receive a pension of £500,000 after retirement.

 

I have no idea if this is true, but the facts and figures put about do at times make it very confusing, you're (I) am never to sure who to believe anymore.

 

Cheers Tony.

 

That's their total 'pot' that they would draw from.

So they may get 50k on retirement, but if they live for 30 years after retiring, that's £450k divided by 30 = 15k per year (plus interest etc).

 

Hardly a kings ransom is it?


"An inspirational leader...exceptionally enthusiastic, committed and motivated" OFSTED 2014.

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When I worked in the UK I joined a non stricking union, most of the nurses I knew would man the picket line on their day off, before their shift or in their meal break because had they gone on strike it would have had a detrimental effect upon patient care and safety. I'm not sure that striking is the answer or an effective problem solving approach.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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Guest The Ropey HOFF

My old dad used to say ............. the working mans number one enemy is ............ himself. And this strike over pensions is typical of that, some people have bought into the government clap trap over ......... these pensions are not affordable, private sector workers don't get the same, teachers are greedy and militant and hell bent on strike no matter what. One teachers union went on strike for the first time in 125 years, what does that tell you? Public sector pensions were changed about 4 years ago, they did away with the half decent pensions that public sector workers are getting, raised the age limit of retirement for new starters and made them pay more, it wasn't good news for youngsters, but we all accepted that something had to be done, but ............ since then the government have spent billions, upon billions of pounds on some needless overseas aid, bailing banks out, fighting stupid wars abroad, bailing out Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Greece again, plus having an open door policy on Immigration and Asylum, which has resulted in this government and the last one, looking at where they can claw back some of the tens of billions of pounds they have wasted and ............... they have targeted public sector pensions, making us pay up to £100 per month extra, work alot longer and get less at the end of it, they see us as an easy target. We are talking about a drop in the ocean of what has been wasted and everyone i know is really angry about it and its private sector pensions that should be increased, not public sector pensions reduced further and ................ don't believe government propaganda ............ we CAN AFFORD IT.

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Guest Guest 47403
That's their total 'pot' that they would draw from.

So they may get 50k on retirement, but if they live for 30 years after retiring, that's £450k divided by 30 = 15k per year (plus interest etc).

 

Hardly a kings ransom is it?

 

How much would the average teacher contribute to recieve that 15k a year?

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Guest Andy
This is how the press divide and conquer.

My old man retired a few years ago, but aged 60i sh there was a huge hit to pensions as shares took a tumble, meaning his pot was around 25% smaller. The market can go up as well as down etc.

 

 

This front page here has some telling information on the "gold plated" pensions of teachers. Note which job has the largest average pension...

 

http://liberalconspiracy.org/2011/06/29/excellent-indy-front-page-compares-public-pensions-to-mps/

 

Another excuse the government use is that 'the country can't afford it'.

But figures in the Hutton Report show that the cost of these pensions peaked in 2010/11, but will go down year on year for the next few decades - from 1.9% of GDP last year to 1.2% in a few years time.

 

http://blogs.channel4.com/factcheck/factcheck-are-public-sector-pensions-unaffordable/7138

 

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Business/Public-Sector-Pensions-Affordability-Row-Hutton-Report-Shows-Payouts-As-Percentage-Of-GDP-Will-Fall/Article/201106416021762?f=rss

 

So in a nutshell, there is no pain to share - the pensions cost the same as they always did, and are in fact costing less each year.

How would you feel Andy if your suppliers told you the cost of your bits over the last 20 years had now been changed, and they wanted you to pay them an extra 5% on top of everything that you've already paid for those goods?

I would tell them to go **** themselves:biggrin:

 

Anyway i hear what you are saying and the point i was trying to make was that for those who have a kind of divided opinion it's very difficult to know whether to support the strike's or not to.

 

Anyway i am taking the kids to see the government in action this afternoon which will be an eye opener:eek:, yes we are off to the circus :laugh::cool: in sunny Shabbington.

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Guest guest37336
How much would the average teacher contribute to recieve that 15k a year?

 

As far as I understand it, teachers put in 7% of their salary into their pension payments, and the public put in 14% into the same teacher pension fund, per month/year.

 

To dim to do the maths, and I 'could' be wrong.:yes:

 

Cheers Tony.

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Guest Guest 47403
As far as I understand it, teachers put in 7% of their salary into their pension payments, and the public put in 14% into the same teacher pension fund, per month/year.

 

To dim to do the maths, and I 'could' be wrong.:yes:

 

Cheers Tony.

 

Thanks Tony, and what are the government proposing should change just regarding those figures (if there correct)?

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