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what is the definition of HOME??

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I caught myself the other day talking about "when I lived at home" meaning when I lived with my parents as a child. Now I'm 36, married with children and I've been moved out of "home" for 18 years!! so why do we still talk about that time and call it home?

 

I certainly have no desire to move back "home" infact I can't think of anything worse!! so when people move out to Oz and still think of UK as "home" what does that mean?

 

And it got me thinking, what is the definition of home?? or is it just a word we use?

 

Lisa


Steve 47, Lisa 39, 2 Kids 16 + 11

PR VISA GRANTED July 09 , Validated Visa Nov 09. Living in Adelaide

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Guest The Ropey HOFF

To me home, is where you are currently living, previous homes are just that............ in relation to emigrating, some people don't settle and use the term........... it never felt like home, but to me that means it didn't feel like where they previously lived and seeing as how i live in old run down Dewsbury in Yorkshire, i hope Australia doesn't feel like that. lol

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I caught myself the other day talking about "when I lived at home" meaning when I lived with my parents as a child. Now I'm 36, married with children and I've been moved out of "home" for 18 years!! so why do we still talk about that time and call it home?

 

I certainly have no desire to move back "home" infact I can't think of anything worse!! so when people move out to Oz and still think of UK as "home" what does that mean?

 

And it got me thinking, what is the definition of home?? or is it just a word we use?

 

Lisa

 

We have immigrated twice now. 1st was Zimbabwe to UK, then UK to Aus.

 

When we were in the UK, we always referred to Zim as "home", however, we went back to Zim for a holiday, and THEN we started referring to the UK as "home" and Zim just became Zim.

 

Second time around, Aus seemed to become "home" a lot quicker, and now we are going back to the UK for a holiday (Not back "home"....)

 

My Granny always tells me, the difference between your house and your home is that your home is where you are loved :hug:

:wubclub:

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Guest siamsusie

My roots are in Holland, but my home is in Australia.

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Guest Mallam

Where the heart is.

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Guest

Home. Is where the heart is. My heart is with my husband and son. Home is where I am, where we are, plain and simple. Its the family, my/our things, our dog, the creaking floorboard outside the loo that I always stand on, the smell of cooking lasagne or meatballs wafting from the kitchen and the fresh coffee brewed every morning.

 

My hometown is where I grew up but its not home to me. Home is my home, where I walk in the door and its only my family and myself there.

 

I think people have varying degrees of what can be classed as 'home'. Its a much used, perhaps overused generalised term. Home for many is their home country, but it also is their hometown (which some have never left) and also where they grew up. Its also the house they lived in or live in. Or the town they currently live in. Its all relative depending on the person and their interpretation of what they consider 'home'.

 

When you move away from the UK it elevates the status of the UK to 'home' more so than anything else IMO. Some people hanker after home and want to go back, others settle and consider their new home home. And the UK no longer is viewed as that place.

 

For us, we are happy in the UK but Aus is hubby's home and I'm fine with moving there. I love where we will be living, have spent time there and so once there, it'll be our 'home'. It'll be us, our family, our things and for me that defines home more than anything.

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Guest
My roots are in Holland, but my home is in Australia.

 

I have to say my 5 years living in the Netherlands, it was very much home to me. Some of the best years of my (single) life. It certainly holds a special place in my heart and will be a place I will always think of as 'home' of sorts but not hankering after it or anything. It has happy memories, friends and so much more. But its not home any longer.

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Guest siamsusie
I have to say my 5 years living in the Netherlands, it was very much home to me. Some of the best years of my (single) life. It certainly holds a special place in my heart and will be a place I will always think of as 'home' of sorts but not hankering after it or anything. It has happy memories, friends and so much more. But its not home any longer.

 

When I sit in my Oma & Opa's home, it has such a special feeling about it... safe I guess.. full of memories, nothing can take that away from me Snifter, it was my home, this evening on the phone she asked when I was coming home:cry:.. I cry when the plane lands at Schipol and I cry when I come home to Tasmania.. strange old word.:huh:

 

Susie x

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Guest VickyMel

The UK has a general classification of home for me.

 

As does my family home in the UK - even though I have only ever stayed there whilst visiting.

 

But I am also home when I return to my home that I have shared with my partner for years (and this is top of my home classification - where I feel most content) - and that country also holds another classification of home.

 

I am expecting that Australia will become home along the way and the house I share with my partner will become home pretty quickly.

 

 

I'm quite happy to have several places that I consider home.

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Guest Mallam

This famous quote say's it all.

 

An anecdote is told of a post-war refugee family transferred from place to place in search of settlement. On one occasion, the family was standing in a train station surrounded by their tattered suitcases, boxes and bags when a bystander approached the family's six-year-old daughter and remarked, "You poor darling, moving about so much with no place to call home."

The little girl looked up in surprise. "You are mistaken," she replied, "I do have a home I just don't have a house to put it into."

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