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container shipping: condensation moisture problems?

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I would like to check about container shipping and condensation moisture problems.

 

So when you got your container stuff from England over to Australia and unpacked the stuff finally in Australia did you notice any signs of wetness or condensation moisture?

 

I am particularly asking myself that question with regard to clothing, bedding (duvets) and of course books.

 

I am curious to learn from your experiences.:wubclub:

Many thanks.

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When I moved from South Africa to the UK I packed my books in Plastic Bags, added a teaspoon of Epson Salts to each Bag and then sealed the bags to ensure that there was no moisture problems. They all arrived in the UK in perfect condition!


TRA Submitted 24/03/11,TRA Successful 18/04/11,WA SA Submitted 19/04/11,WA Approved 20/05/11,176 Visa lodged 20/05/11,Form 1100 to DIAC 22/06/11,CO Assigned 05/07/11,Medicals 19/9/11 Finalized 27/09/11,S.Africa+UK PCC sent to CO 6/10/11,VISA Granted 7/10/11!

 

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Guest destinationoz

I can't remember which shipping co but one said to me that they put stuff (silica gel I think) in the container to stop the moisture

I have also read on here that others get small packets of silica gel from eBay or somewhere and add it to their boxes ... (it always comes in shoe boxes or new bags etc)

Hope that helps a little ....

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Many thanks for your helpful replies.:wubclub:

 

So that means it is allowed/possible to place those silica bags inside the cardboard boxes, right?

--------

 

I am particularly curious to find out if the following has happened to one of you on this forum.

 

1) I read on the internet that the roof of the container may get wet due to different weather conditions. Assuming my boxes (having a partial load or "groupage") are one the top, under the roof, what if there is a hole or extensive condensation so the moisture starts dripping down on my boxes? Is this likely to happen? Did it happen to any of you? -- With this possibility in mind I am exactly NOT convinced why it is not clever to use plastic wrapping for, say, books. Because if there is some extensive dripping from the roof it would be helpful to have the books put inside plastic bags, wouldn't it?!

 

2) IF there was indeed the possibility of condensation moisture inside plastic bags which doesn't come from the roof (assuming I used plastic bags to wrap my books), would it make any difference if I added those silica things to the bags? So, would it be possible to use plastic bags when I use silica as well? (=The condensation moisture inside plastic bags does not occur when I add silica bags.)

 

BTW, as in other cases reported on this forum our removal company said it is not useful to use plastic bags inside. However, their explanation did not convince me, therefore my asking you here.

 

Here is why I am sceptical.

 

Firstly, technically the condensation should be only on the container walls or roof - not inside the boxes. So any moisture inside plastic wrappings resulted from packing them in a humid climate beforehand and I don't think this is likely the case (in my case).

 

Secondly, I also don't really trust the removal companies for other reasons, such as, the vacuum problem which has been talked about often on this forum. The thing is it is obviously not clear why vacuum wrapping should not be helpful if it avoids moisture due to lack of oxygen. The reason why removal companies don't want you to vacuum wrap your belongings seems to be that they don't want you to save space (because then they would make less money)!

 

Am I just inventing too much bad endings here, am I too sceptical about everything?:err:

 

Any advice would be much appreciated.

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I believe that for insurance purposes you will need to get the removal company to pack for you otherwise they will only pay out for loss of items and not damage so you will not really have a choice.

 

I would think that the removal companies don't want you to pack in plastic because if there is any moisture in the items being packed you will land up with mold growing in the micro climate created by the plastic. Silica Gel/Epsom Salts will definitely help with the moisture but the plastic bags have to be completely sealed (no air leakage) otherwise the gel will be exhausted by moisture from the outside air. Epsom Salts also help with fish moths I believe. As for the Vacuum packing if you puncture the plastic air will be drawn in from the outside and I'm sure you are correct about packing more in and I do not think the removal company would like that!:twitcy: I have used second hand silica gel in the past just pop them on the radiator or in the oven at a very low heat to recharge them!


TRA Submitted 24/03/11,TRA Successful 18/04/11,WA SA Submitted 19/04/11,WA Approved 20/05/11,176 Visa lodged 20/05/11,Form 1100 to DIAC 22/06/11,CO Assigned 05/07/11,Medicals 19/9/11 Finalized 27/09/11,S.Africa+UK PCC sent to CO 6/10/11,VISA Granted 7/10/11!

 

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We made a decision. We will not use any plastic bags for our big pile of books. However, we ordered a lot of acid free paper sheets and silica gel bags over the internet.

 

We also read some interesting things about acid free paper on the internet yesterday which is also used to protect antique books and other goods.

 

Now let's just hope everything goes well.:unsure:

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Guest ozinpom

Our stuff arrived 2 weeks ago from the UK to Sydney. We had books, paintings, clothes paperwork, bedding etc. No problems with condensation at all, not even a whiff of damp. Everything was in cardboard boxes.

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Having read the various advice on vacuum packing I decided to use common sense and use the bags for all our bedding & clothes. Silica sachets just thrown in a box will saturate quickly and won't make a lot of difference over the 2 to 3 months your container is on the water.

I put a few inside each vacuum bag and had no problems. Putting stuff into a vacuum bag is not really seen as 'packing' by the shipping companies, and anyway the sales rep will often give you completely different information to the blokes that come to box it all up.

I found the packing blokes were focussed on getting the job done as fast as possible, and wrapping stuff up according to their training. It really doesn't make any difference to them if you don't fit everything in the container, that is between you and the sales rep, and when they have your wordly possesions and are asking for a few extra hundred quid to take the bits that didn't fit in, you are over a barrell. Don't be surprised if they don't busy themselves making sure all that empty drawer space in a chest of drawers is filled up, take the initiative and do it yourself. Just make sure it is obvious what is in the space so they can list it correctly on the inventory.

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Thanks for your replies.:hug:

BTW, we will pack ourselves so can use as less space and as much time as we want.:yes:

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