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Petals

Australian houses dearest

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Guest chris955

We will definitely be looking for a laundry in our next house, that is essential or at least space where I can build one.

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We will definitely be looking for a laundry in our next house, that is essential or at least space where I can build one.

 

We have just done away with the laundry in our house - we have put the washing machine in a big cupboard with storage space in the kitchen and have a large kitchen sink. We did it after much consideration and hope that we wont regret it. The space it has made in the kitchen (knocking the two rooms into one) has been fabulous. At the moment I dont see the down side and hope it continues that way - the DH was quite anxious about it but eventually succumbed. We had a "green" architect around to give us some ideas and he suggested the laundry in the bathroom but the restructuring to do that would have been much bigger and at that stage we werent prepared to do without a bath which his plans suggested. Ah the joys of a tiny house, huh! (and a price tag of $650k++ if the neighbourhood is anything to go by - EEEK!)

 

As for needing two loos - nah, one is fine (and less hassle to keep clean!)

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Guest Toorak Trev
For me it is essential, for you maybe not... I generally have many people staying and another bathroom and loo is important for us.

 

 

High ceilings mean better ventilation and therefore more energy efficient for cooling in summer. Better made homes (not necessarily mcMansions) have better insulation for both cool and warmer months.

 

Its the same reason people will pay a premium for a better made motor vehicle. Although some dont understand quality and mistake it for brand/fashion.

 

2 teenages with different music tastes next door to each other with poor internal wall insulation? Your just asking for a migraine:biglaugh:

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Guest Toorak Trev
We have just done away with the laundry in our house - we have put the washing machine in a big cupboard with storage space in the kitchen and have a large kitchen sink. We did it after much consideration and hope that we wont regret it. The space it has made in the kitchen (knocking the two rooms into one) has been fabulous. At the moment I dont see the down side and hope it continues that way - the DH was quite anxious about it but eventually succumbed. We had a "green" architect around to give us some ideas and he suggested the laundry in the bathroom but the restructuring to do that would have been much bigger and at that stage we werent prepared to do without a bath which his plans suggested. Ah the joys of a tiny house, huh! (and a price tag of $650k++ if the neighbourhood is anything to go by - EEEK!)

 

As for needing two loos - nah, one is fine (and less hassle to keep clean!)

 

Well done on the laundry in kitchen - it does make a lot of sense, and some doors can hide both the sight and sound.

 

My wife would have to disagree about the toilets :chatterbox:. When I have the boys over for a curry and cigar evening she is quite happy to have her own girls throne room.:laugh:

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Guest siamsusie
High ceilings mean better ventilation and therefore more energy efficient for cooling in summer. Better made homes (not necessarily mcMansions) have better insulation for both cool and warmer months.

 

Its the same reason people will pay a premium for a better made motor vehicle. Although some dont understand quality and mistake it for brand/fashion.

 

2 teenages with different music tastes next door to each other with poor internal wall insulation? Your just asking for a migraine:biglaugh:

 

High ceilings in my English/Scottish houses meant huge heating bills:cry: lovely to look at for sure.

 

Teenagers should all be allocated their own teenage space outside of the house, where noise and smell arent so in your face/nose:wink:

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Guest siamsusie
Well done on the laundry in kitchen - it does make a lot of sense, and some doors can hide both the sight and sound.

 

My wife would have to disagree about the toilets :chatterbox:. When I have the boys over for a curry and cigar evening she is quite happy to have her own girls throne room.:laugh:

 

 

Laundry in the kitchen:wacko::mad: this is the "clean area".. still whatever suits:biggrin:

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Guest chris955

It's only dirty clothes, it's not as if you rub them all over the worktops. My wife doesn't like it and we will have a laundry room but I can't see a big problem with it.

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We have three loos two inside and one outside and only accessed from outside but part of the house. Its the best thing we ever did when the children were young they did not have to traipse through the house to the loo, also their friends. When we have people over for a barbecure once again its great.

 

Its also a good place to escape to for a read and my oh and my son when he is at home make good use of it.

 

As for the laundry I have a biggish one but more space more mess so the smaller the better.


Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

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It's only dirty clothes, it's not as if you rub them all over the worktops. My wife doesn't like it and we will have a laundry room but I can't see a big problem with it.

 

Yup, our washing machine and gubbins is all out of the way on the other side of the room - just the same distance as it was when there was a wall between. Nothing dirty goes over to the workbench side. Even so, having lived with a washing machine under the kitchen bench like my parents do, doesnt faze me in the least. We just chose not to go that route.

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Guest guest30038
Laundry in the kitchen this is the "clean area".. still whatever suits:biggrin:

 

Did someone say "clean area"? :biglaugh:

 

This is our old kitchen in the UK. The small chest freezer to Bridget's left (under the window) actually housed a coal bunker originally............yes:goofy:.................they shot coal through a hole in the wall into the kitchen! :biglaugh: Where the window is was a concrete slab (to the outside) that was the cold shelf to the pantry above the coal bunker! :shocked:

 

Bottom right corner is the washing machine next to the sink. The washer doubled as a draining board :rolleyes:..........showing above that is the door knob (entrance to kitchen) which gives you an idea of the size of it :rolleyes:

 

As you can see from the shelves............I liked to make my own puckles and wine..............and ya just have to decorate joists with something dontcha?..................pretentious dwelling or what? :biglaugh:

 

kitchenuk.jpg

 

kev

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Guest siamsusie

:elvis::cool: omg! its very full Kev. Giggling here!! Now tell me things have changed now in Brisbane!!

 

3096718.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=45B0EB3381F7834DFBEC9622EBA8EDE8C6A7ED7E3B141B1003AA0CF64F13FC89

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Guest guest30038
:elvis::cool: omg! its very full Kev. Giggling here!! Now tell me things have changed now in Brisbane!!

 

3096718.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=45B0EB3381F7834DFBEC9622EBA8EDE8C6A7ED7E3B141B1003AA0CF64F13FC89

 

Not much.................you know how backward Qld is :wink: :biglaugh:

 

kev

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Guest siamsusie
Not much.................you know how backward Qld is

 

kev

 

:biglaugh::biglaugh: and you mean to say The Hoff has been fooled all this time, he only sees big modern McMansions....

 

I do however see that he is expressing an interest in Adelaide, I wonder whether Glenelg is ready for him yet:cute:anyway Daniel will have subject matter to pray over I guess:laugh:

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Separate laundry; not essential

2nd or 3rd bathroom/loo; not essential

kids extra living room; not essential

 

BUT,

 

if you can squeeze them in/afford them surely the majority agree that they're worth having, just to give you more privacy, peace, cleanliness, etc?!!

 

Surely, most folk wouldn't squeeze the laundry into the kitchen unless they had to (cost or space in house); would they?

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Did someone say "clean area"? :biglaugh:

 

This is our old kitchen in the UK. The small chest freezer to Bridget's left (under the window) actually housed a coal bunker originally............yes:goofy:.................they shot coal through a hole in the wall into the kitchen!

Coal is actually quite clean - it's washed thoroughly in the processing line. In parts of Asia people use coal dust for cleaning their teeth - I think we probably used to. And you can still get coal tar soap.


Feb 2010 Prospective Marriage Visa | Nov 2010 Temporary Partner Visa | Nov 2012 Permanent Partner Visa | Jan 2015 Australian Citizenship

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Guest siamsusie
Coal is actually quite clean - it's washed thoroughly in the processing line. In parts of Asia people use coal dust for cleaning their teeth - I think we probably used to. And you can still get coal tar soap.

 

toothpaste.jpg

 

I use Darkie toothpaste the whole time, brings them up sparkling white so it does:biggrin:

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Actually, I was thinking more of this:

 

black-tooth-powder-monkey-brand.jpg


Feb 2010 Prospective Marriage Visa | Nov 2010 Temporary Partner Visa | Nov 2012 Permanent Partner Visa | Jan 2015 Australian Citizenship

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Getting rid of negative gearing would help as mum and dad investors compete with first home buyers for the lower end of the market and push prices up.

 

A small house here went for around three twenty this last week, it was on the market for a week and you can bet an investor would have snapped it up.

 

I have watched a lot of smaller homes here ideal for a first home with quite large land go to investors. Yes they provide rentals and rentals are needed but this is the gov way of avoiding providing long time secure homes for people on lower incomes. Lets face it our lives would be so different without lower paid workers. The tasks they complete we take for granted.

 

Think you are spot on there petals.

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Guest chris955

Nowhere near enough.

 

What's the average wage in Broken Hill?

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Median income PW from 2006 census on Australian Bureau of Statistics

 

Broken Hill $334

Newcastle $395

Wollongong $395

Perth $513

Gold Coast $475

Brisbane $516

Melbourne $481

Sydney $518

 

Nat Ave $466

 

 

 

In Broken Hill © (Statistical Local Area), the median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $334, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $616, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $829, compared with $1,171 in Australia.

 

In Broken Hill © (Statistical Local Area), the median weekly rent was $110, compared to $190 in Australia. The median monthly housing loan repayment was $650, compared to $1,300 in Australia. The average household size was 2.3 and the average number of persons per bedroom was 1.1.

 

 

In Sydney (Major Statistical Region), the median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $518, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $1,154, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $1,350, compared with $1,171 in Australia.

 

In Sydney (Major Statistical Region), the median weekly rent was $250, compared to $190 in Australia. The median monthly housing loan repayment was $1,800, compared to $1,300 in Australia. The average household size was 2.7 and the average number of persons per bedroom was 1.1.

 

 

In Melbourne (Major Statistical Region), the median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $481, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $1,079, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $1,242, compared with $1,171 in Australia.

 

In Melbourne (Major Statistical Region), the median weekly rent was $200, compared to $190 in Australia. The median monthly housing loan repayment was $1,300, compared to $1,300 in Australia. The average household size was 2.6 and the average number of persons per bedroom was 1.1.

 

 

In Brisbane (Major Statistical Region), the median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $516, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $1,111, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $1,262, compared with $1,171 in Australia.

 

In Brisbane (Major Statistical Region), the median weekly rent was $220, compared to $190 in Australia. The median monthly housing loan repayment was $1,300, compared to $1,300 in Australia. The average household size was 2.6 and the average number of persons per bedroom was 1.1.

 

In Gold Coast (Statistical Region), the median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $475, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $1,016, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $1,132, compared with $1,171 in Australia.

 

 

In Gold Coast (Statistical Region), the median weekly rent was $260, compared to $190 in Australia. The median monthly housing loan repayment was $1,473, compared to $1,300 in Australia. The average household size was 2.5 and the average number of persons per bedroom was 1.1.

 

 

In Perth (Major Statistical Region), the median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $513, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $1,086, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $1,298, compared with $1,171 in Australia.

 

In Perth (Major Statistical Region), the median weekly rent was $180, compared to $190 in Australia. The median monthly housing loan repayment was $1,300, compared to $1,300 in Australia. The average household size was 2.5 and the average number of persons per bedroom was 1.1

 

 

In Wollongong (Statistical Region Sector), the median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $395, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $955, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $1,143, compared with $1,171 in Australia.

 

In Wollongong (Statistical Region Sector), the median weekly rent was $185, compared to $190 in Australia. The median monthly housing loan repayment was $1,517, compared to $1,300 in Australia. The average household size was 2.6 and the average number of persons per bedroom was 1.1.

 

 

 

In Newcastle (Statistical Region Sector), the median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $395, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $900, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $1,099, compared with $1,171 in Australia.

 

In Newcastle (Statistical Region Sector), the median weekly rent was $185, compared to $190 in Australia. The median monthly housing loan repayment was $1,300, compared to $1,300 in Australia. The average household size was 2.5 and the average number of persons per bedroom was 1.1.

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Median income PW from 2006 census on Australian Bureau of Statistics

 

...

 

In Broken Hill © (Statistical Local Area), the median weekly individual income for persons aged 15 years and over who were usual residents was $334, compared with $466 in Australia. The median weekly household income was $616, compared with $1,027 in Australia. The median weekly family income was $829, compared with $1,171 in Australia.

 

 

Thanks for the info!

Given that it's from 2006, we have to do some maths:

 

Broken Hill average household income: $616

Australia average household income: $1027 which is 66% more than Broken Hill.

 

This means the $265'000 house translates into approximately $439'000 in the Australian average.

 

So if I make the (not unreasonable) assumption that your statement "$265k for a 4x2 easily affordable for the average wage earner." means "$265k for a 4x2 [is] easily affordable for the average wage earner in Broken Hill", then we can translate this into "$439'000 for a 4x2 is easily affordable for the average wage earner in Australia". Is this a reasonable statement? This is not a rhetorical question!

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Thanks for the info!

Given that it's from 2006, we have to do some maths:

 

Broken Hill average household income: $616

Australia average household income: $1027 which is 66% more than Broken Hill.

 

This means the $265'000 house translates into approximately $439'000 in the Australian average.

 

So if I make the (not unreasonable) assumption that your statement "$265k for a 4x2 easily affordable for the average wage earner." means "$265k for a 4x2 [is] easily affordable for the average wage earner in Broken Hill", then we can translate this into "$439'000 for a 4x2 is easily affordable for the average wage earner in Australia". Is this a reasonable statement? This is not a rhetorical question!

 

Well if you were selling your pokey 3BR house in Grimsby and looking to buy something affordable then Broken Hill would be more affordable than Sydney.

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Guest chris955

You still can't escape the fact that this is Broken Hill we are talking about here, I would be surprised if even 1% of immigrants would want to live there.

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You still can't escape the fact that this is Broken Hill we are talking about here, I would be surprised if even 1% of immigrants would want to live there.

 

I also forgot to ask - what kind of work is available in Broken Hill?

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