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Guest Jamie Smith

Is Employer-sponsorship a viable way forward?

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Guest Jamie Smith

Priority 4 = try to become Priority 1, with an employer's job offer.

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Guest Susan Wareham McGrath

Hi Jamie

 

Just to clarify, has DIAC changed the requirements for Priority 1, or do applicants need to arrange employer sponsorship, rather than just a job offer?

Cheers

S

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Guest Jamie Smith
Hi Jamie

 

Just to clarify, has DIAC changed the requirements for Priority 1, or do applicants need to arrange employer sponsorship, rather than just a job offer?

Cheers

S

 

Well really, something new for you? :tongue: The two go hand in hand.

 

Step 1. The job offer is the key to the sponsorship door.

Step 2. Sponsorship is key to the visa door.

Step 3. Refer to step 1.

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Guest Gollywobbler

Hi Jamie

 

Your discussion about possible employer-sponsorship has nothing to do with George's information about the new Client Service Charter so I have split the threads. I have moved your own topic into the main Migration Issues section of the forum because what you are saying is not new information. The Minister has been suggesting your own idea for the last 18 months, after all.

 

Are you trying to advertise your own services, perchance? If you are, I will shift this thread into The Shed, which is the section that deals with the sale of goods and services.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Guest Jamie Smith

Thanks Gill

 

No not advertising otherwise I would be more direct about it. My google adwords will resume shortly, they provide a higher click through. Just trying to assist without being too specific.

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Well really, something new for you? :tongue: The two go hand in hand.

 

Step 1. The job offer is the key to the sponsorship door.

Step 2. Sponsorship is key to the visa door.

Step 3. Refer to step 1.

 

try doing this as a hairdresser, beleive me i have spoke,emailed and even seen people in person and it is nigh on impossible to get sponsorship in this trade.

i had plenty of offers of jobs when we get there, but no one will take the risk of sponsoring.

i even got in touch with you for your services to no avail, so any advice for cat 4 people like me would be great.

jools x

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try doing this as a hairdresser, beleive me i have spoke,emailed and even seen people in person and it is nigh on impossible to get sponsorship in this trade.

i had plenty of offers of jobs when we get there, but no one will take the risk of sponsoring.

i even got in touch with you for your services to no avail, so any advice for cat 4 people like me would be great.

jools x

 

If SA don't include Hairdressing on their SMP, then this is a route we will be looking into.

I was under the impression that for ENS the employer had to meet criteria which included having a "certain number of employees" although looking now at the DIAC website I can't find this information. Have they recently relaxed this rule, or have I got confused and this relates to a different class of sponsored visa? I do remember something being said about DIAC trying to make it easier for employers to sponsor?

This is why I originally thought it would be difficult to obtain ENS sponsorship in hairdressing due to the fact hairdressing business generally have limited numbers of employees.

When I researched RSMS there was no such restriction and so I thought this more feasable in terms of employer eligibility, however, in general, the majority of hairdressing vacancies tend to fall within metropolitan areas which would mean an ENS sponsorship.

 

What other obstacles are in the way of small businesses in terms of sponsoring overseas workers. Is there a general lack of information out there for them to even consider this as a viable option? Do the other criteria an employer would need to meet play a part? E.g such as minimum salary?

 

Why would sponsoring an immigrant be a risk to any potential employer? If the employee did not meet expectations, what if any repercussions will the employer meet if they terminate the sponsored employees employment. One immediate risk I see is the nomination application fee, but other than that I can't see anything, unless I am looking in the wrong places.

 

I can't see myself ever paying for the services of a company to arrange interviews for positions with potential sponsorship, with no guarantee of a job afterwards. I think as Gill has suggested, there's a real need to safeguard applicants, If all the work of such a company does in fact lead to sponsorship and Visa in hand, then at that point I would be more than happy to part with the thousands of dollars required for these services.


Sarah 33, Dewi 32, Libby 8, Zack 6, Roxy 20 months, Blake 3 months VISA GRANTED 07/03/2011 FLYING OUT 13TH SEPTEMBER 2011:jiggy:LIVING HERVEY BAY LOVING IT!!!!!

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If SA don't include Hairdressing on their SMP, then this is a route we will be looking into.

I was under the impression that for ENS the employer had to meet criteria which included having a "certain number of employees" although looking now at the DIAC website I can't find this information. Have they recently relaxed this rule, or have I got confused and this relates to a different class of sponsored visa? I do remember something being said about DIAC trying to make it easier for employers to sponsor?

This is why I originally thought it would be difficult to obtain ENS sponsorship in hairdressing due to the fact hairdressing business generally have limited numbers of employees.

When I researched RSMS there was no such restriction and so I thought this more feasable in terms of employer eligibility, however, in general, the majority of hairdressing vacancies tend to fall within metropolitan areas which would mean an ENS sponsorship.

 

What other obstacles are in the way of small businesses in terms of sponsoring overseas workers. Is there a general lack of information out there for them to even consider this as a viable option? Do the other criteria an employer would need to meet play a part? E.g such as minimum salary?

 

Why would sponsoring an immigrant be a risk to any potential employer? If the employee did not meet expectations, what if any repercussions will the employer meet if they terminate the sponsored employees employment. One immediate risk I see is the nomination application fee, but other than that I can't see anything, unless I am looking in the wrong places.

 

I can't see myself ever paying for the services of a company to arrange interviews for positions with potential sponsorship, with no guarantee of a job afterwards. I think as Gill has suggested, there's a real need to safeguard applicants, If all the work of such a company does in fact lead to sponsorship and Visa in hand, then at that point I would be more than happy to part with the thousands of dollars required for these services.

 

You might benefit from reading the DIAC Booklet 5.


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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Guest Susan Wareham McGrath
Well really, something new for you? :tongue: The two go hand in hand.

 

Step 1. The job offer is the key to the sponsorship door.

Step 2. Sponsorship is key to the visa door.

Step 3. Refer to step 1.

 

Hi Jamie

 

Thanks for that.

 

For many people they don't go hand in hand - it's much easier for people to get job offers than to get sponsorship. A job offer costs the employer nothing.

 

Sponsorship has obligations and financial costs, which makes many employers back down, even after they've made a job offer to a visa holder or visa applicant.

 

Chris and I are often approached by people who've been told that a job offer is enough to get them a visa and they get very disappointed when we explain the difference between a job offer and sponsorship in terms of visa eligibility.

 

Personally, I'd lke to see the Australian Government launch a campaign to explain the benefits of sponsorship to employers - I think it would be a really helpful initiative and would help the economy as well as potential sponsored workers.

 

Cheers

S

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Guest Susan Wareham McGrath

Hi Libbysmum and Jools

 

Hairdresser and Hairdresser - Supervisor are on the list of occupations that are eligible to be included in State Migration Plans (SMP).

 

Hairdresser is also on the NT's most recent State Sponsorship List (published in March this year) and while no-one knows yet which occupations will be on anyone's SMP, don't give up yet, there might still be options for you, either via an SMP, or via an off-list sponsorship.

 

Best regards

Susan

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Guest Gollywobbler
Hi Jamie

 

Thanks for that.

 

For many people they don't go hand in hand - it's much easier for people to get job offers than to get sponsorship. A job offer costs the employer nothing.

 

Sponsorship has obligations and financial costs, which makes many employers back down, even after they've made a job offer to a visa holder or visa applicant.

 

Chris and I are often approached by people who've been told that a job offer is enough to get them a visa and they get very disappointed when we explain the difference between a job offer and sponsorship in terms of visa eligibility.

 

Personally, I'd lke to see the Australian Government launch a campaign to explain the benefits of sponsorship to employers - I think it would be a really helpful initiative and would help the economy as well as potential sponsored workers.

 

Cheers

S

 

Hi Susan

 

I asked David Wilden in London about this a few weeks ago.

 

Apart from the idea of inviting Aussie employers to traipse round the world to the promised Expos, DIAC do not seem to have any ideas.

 

David told me that, particularly in the Regions, a typical Aussie employer runs a tiny business that he first started, and now he runs it with the aid of his son. David said that the vast majority of Aussie businesses are very small - which is also the case in the UK. If David is right about such employers, then it seems to me that:

 

1. Such a small employer is not going to leave his business to run itself whilst he or his son go jaunting round the world and they probably can't afford the costs of doing so. David said that a tiny business typically only wants one extra employee.

 

2. It seems to me that at least part of the purpose of GSM visas must have been so that small employers in Oz would not have to get involved with the hassle and expense of sponsoring an employee for a visa, surely?

 

David said that his DIAC colleagues in Oz have had several meetings with Aussie employers. The employers have made it clear to them how their businesses work and what those businesses require. Visa hassles for the sake of an employee are not something that they either require or want, regardless of however much the Minister might want them to put up with it.

 

What scares me - and I don't understand it - is why is the Minister doggedly determined to persist with the idea of employer-sponsored visas when the employers have made it abundantly clear to DIAC that this is not what they want? If Aussie employers don't want it, why is the Minister pursuing it?

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Guest proud2beaussie
is why is the Minister doggedly determined to persist with the idea of employer-sponsored visas when the employers have made it abundantly clear to DIAC that this is not what they want? If Aussie employers don't want it, why is the Minister pursuing it?
Hi Gill,

Maybe he wants to shift the burden of regulating skilled migrant visas to the employers and DEEWR so that DIAC staff are free to pursue other things-like processing asylum seekers?

Cheers

Nigel

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Susan

 

do you think it possible that the people that already have state sponsorship for off-list nominations may be included in the SMP's?

 

Hi Libbysmum and Jools

 

Hairdresser and Hairdresser - Supervisor are on the list of occupations that are eligible to be included in State Migration Plans (SMP).

 

Hairdresser is also on the NT's most recent State Sponsorship List (published in March this year) and while no-one knows yet which occupations will be on anyone's SMP, don't give up yet, there might still be options for you, either via an SMP, or via an off-list sponsorship.

 

Best regards

Susan


Michelle, John, Charlie, Ashley

Visa lodged 27/11/09 C/O 23/3 4/4/11 meds

14/4/11 VISA GRANTED ! Flying 30 November :jiggy:

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Guest Jamie Smith

Hi all

 

I agree that the employer sponsored system requires DIAC to educate employers about How It Works. Otherwise it's up to applicants etc.

 

DIAC can tap into the ASIC list of business numbers and send everyone a letter. Might cost $5 to $10 million, but money well spent.

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Guest Jamie Smith

The Liberal Party advocates making it easier for small businesses to become sponsors. I hope this means doing away with the training tax, oops levy paid to TAFE etc, but it will perhaps lead instead to labour market testing and evidence of earlier job advertising.

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If SA don't include Hairdressing on their SMP, then this is a route we will be looking into.

I was under the impression that for ENS the employer had to meet criteria which included having a "certain number of employees" although looking now at the DIAC website I can't find this information. Have they recently relaxed this rule, or have I got confused and this relates to a different class of sponsored visa? I do remember something being said about DIAC trying to make it easier for employers to sponsor?

This is why I originally thought it would be difficult to obtain ENS sponsorship in hairdressing due to the fact hairdressing business generally have limited numbers of employees.

When I researched RSMS there was no such restriction and so I thought this more feasable in terms of employer eligibility, however, in general, the majority of hairdressing vacancies tend to fall within metropolitan areas which would mean an ENS sponsorship.

 

What other obstacles are in the way of small businesses in terms of sponsoring overseas workers. Is there a general lack of information out there for them to even consider this as a viable option? Do the other criteria an employer would need to meet play a part? E.g such as minimum salary?

 

Why would sponsoring an immigrant be a risk to any potential employer? If the employee did not meet expectations, what if any repercussions will the employer meet if they terminate the sponsored employees employment. One immediate risk I see is the nomination application fee, but other than that I can't see anything, unless I am looking in the wrong places.

 

I can't see myself ever paying for the services of a company to arrange interviews for positions with potential sponsorship, with no guarantee of a job afterwards. I think as Gill has suggested, there's a real need to safeguard applicants, If all the work of such a company does in fact lead to sponsorship and Visa in hand, then at that point I would be more than happy to part with the thousands of dollars required for these services.

hi libbysmum,

when i spoke to employers in perth one of the problems with sponsoring was the pay which the goverment say you have to pay sponsored stylist, one it would be a lot higher then the other staff and two it was more than a small buisness could cope with.

i did my recki over a year ago and this might have changed since then, but i do still email salons with my c.v and ask about sponsorship and the reply is allways the same " pop in when you get here".

ive been hairdressing 17 years with an impressive cv , i even spoke to toni and guy( as i have a contact high up in training in sydney) and they said the goverment is making it hard to sponsor at the moment so who knows.

i just hope the smps give us all something to be happy about:jiggy:

jools x

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