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Salma

Is the lucky country the friendly country?

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Guest guest37336
The Sydney Morning Herald Blogs: Travel

 

What are your thoughts on the above article?

 

The 'copywriters' of that article ought to be taken to court. I reckon they have perused PIO, nicked comments, and then copied and pasted them into their own website.:biglaugh:

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The 'copywriters' of that article ought to be taken to court. I reckon they have perused PIO, nicked comments, and then copied and pasted them into their own website.:biglaugh:

 

 

:biglaugh:

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Guest bluebud

I have worked with Aussies for years and they are no different to all of us to be honest...no more laid back...no more happy....no more miserable, they are folk like all of us and you will get good and bad in every Country in the world.

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More to the point, Salma, what do you think?? You started the thread, why not give your views?

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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Guest sh7t man no way

i think australians are one of the friendly nations in the world--they allways want to have a chat,and muse about the days events---ive being coming to aus for 7 years now,and have had no dramas with the people,theres a few d*******s doted around but there everywhere---i think australia is a more stressful place to live now (house prices,jobs,ect) and this rubs of on the people--but generally they deal with it well.

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More to the point, Salma, what do you think?? You started the thread, why not give your views?

 

Cheers, Bobj.

 

well I have only spent 3 weeks there and enjoyed it and felt that everyone was welcoming.I was not subjected to any racism (to be honest it was the first question i was asked by many on my return, as it is quite a common perception a lot non whites have)

 

All the Australians I have met in the UK have been very friendly and once they find out I am married to a fellow Aussie they treat me as if I am one of them!

 

So for me I think you get all sorts of people and as i have said there is no such thing as unique definition britishness there is no defination of an Australian.

 

I didnt put a comment earlier as I was at work and didnt have the time.

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Many thanks for replying, Salma. In Australia the further away from cities, the more friendly the...er...natives, so to speak.

Because of the vast distances, one has to rely on the next bloke. Up in the Pilbara and the Kimberlies, the Northern Territory and north Queensland, it is not uncommon for a bloke driving past a stationary vehicle to slow down and ask if everyone is alright, or to wave to signify friendship.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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I was talking to a neighbour the other day. when a Indian looking lady come and asked me were somthing springs was.

What springs? shrugged her shoulders sorry don't speak English, She was lost. She said thankyou and went to walk away.

Hang on let me try and help you. Now I would have put her in my van and drove till we found were she was ment to be.

But I said are you Indain she said "yes". Ok My neighbour is Indian lets go see her. She followed me Neighbour was in they spoke the same language. We still struugled to sus out where she should be but my neighbour said she'll sort her out when her husband gets home. They went in for some Chai.

 

I would like to think every English man would do the same. But at least maybe they have both made a new friend.

 

I'm not blowing my own trumpet just thought it was the right thread for the story.


Happy people make dreams come true, miserble people just moan.

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Many thanks for replying, Salma. In Australia the further away from cities, the more friendly the...er...natives, so to speak.

Because of the vast distances, one has to rely on the next bloke. Up in the Pilbara and the Kimberlies, the Northern Territory and north Queensland, it is not uncommon for a bloke driving past a stationary vehicle to slow down and ask if everyone is alright, or to wave to signify friendship.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

 

I went to small victoria town and was treated fine. I think it all depends on how a person is as well towards if you give off negative vibes no one is going to be willing help regardless of your colour etc.

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Guest siamsusie
Many thanks for replying, Salma. In Australia the further away from cities, the more friendly the...er...natives, so to speak.

Because of the vast distances, one has to rely on the next bloke. Up in the Pilbara and the Kimberlies, the Northern Territory and north Queensland, it is not uncommon for a bloke driving past a stationary vehicle to slow down and ask if everyone is alright, or to wave to signify friendship.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

Thats very true Bob, particularly because of the distances invovled... people have often stopped for us and visa versa, all part of the community.

I did laugh yesterday en route back from Hobart to Greens Beach, this woman was limping down the highway, I asked my man to kindly stop for her she appeared in distress..... she was walking for "Breast Cancer" and was struggling with blisters:mad: but she carried on regardless laughing away:wubclub:

 

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This guy clearly has not seen the world. If somone from French, Spain, Germany etc or anywhere in asia, or non English speaking country for that matter tries to stop somone in the UK for directions with broken English they won't get very far either I am afraid, so it's not just Australia.

Indeed it is us poms that are seen in this poor light. We exect everyone to speak English not only in the UK, but also when we travel abroad.

He is only comparing his experience to Japan. If he went to China he would have found it very different.

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Guest guest37336

Two experiences jump to mind about the friendly Aussies. First one was when I was on a flying visit to Brisbane last May. I was at Fortitude Valley train station after having got of a train and I was bloomin starving. I went to one of the vendors, (fish and chips) that are in the station and asked for half a dozen prawns with chips. There I was fiddling with my change and bugger me I was a couple of dollars short, all I had on me was fifty dollar note and some crappy change. I was just about to hand the fifty bucks over when a young fella, (around 18), tapped me on the shoulder and said, 'Naa mate, she'll never take that off yer, here have this'. Without a moments hesitation he handed me a load of loose change and walked away. I tried to get a hold of him, but all he said was, 'Welcome to Australia, mate, see yer'.

 

Now bearing in mind I was dressed in smart casual wear, and fairly neat and tidy in appearance this stupefied me. I could have understood it if I looked as if I didn't have two pennies to rub together, but this young fella would have little of it. He may have seen me as a tourist and taken pity on me, (when in reality I have been backwards and forwards for the last thirty years). But I reckon he was just one of life's gooduns and saw that I was about to get grief of the vendor seller.

 

The other example was when I was backpacking through North West Australia, making my way up to Broome. I had been hitching for about two hours, nothing had passed, absolutely nothing. When out of the blue up turns an old ute and the fella inside offered me a lift. I told him what I was planning on doing and he took great interest. I wasn't in any rush, and it turned out that Steve lived in Port Hedland. I stayed two nights with Steve and his family and then Steve dropped me off in Broome later that week. The hospitality and friendliness astounded me.

 

I am not saying this would 'never' happen in the UK, far from it I imagine, but the Aussies do have an attitude of relaxation and affability. Those two moments stand out for me, great memories. Just wish I knew the name of the young fella at the station.

 

Cheers

 

Tony.

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This guy clearly has not seen the world. If somone from French, Spain, Germany etc or anywhere in asia, or non English speaking country for that matter tries to stop somone in the UK for directions with broken English they won't get very far either I am afraid, so it's not just Australia.

Indeed it is us poms that are seen in this poor light. We exect everyone to speak English not only in the UK, but also when we travel abroad.

He is only comparing his experience to Japan. If he went to China he would have found it very different.

 

I found the Hongcanese a bit rude in their own country but are great immigrants in the UK. That did surprise me

 

I've only been to Germany once but what a great bunch of friendly people.

Yes your right we do exspect everyone to speak English. But to be fair we can't learn every lanuage. And it's not just the Aussies and the Pom's who are ignorant the Yanks and Canadians are the same.


Happy people make dreams come true, miserble people just moan.

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Guest siamsusie
I found the Hongcanese a bit rude in their own country but are great immigrants in the UK. That did surprise me

 

I've only been to Germany once but what a great bunch of friendly people.

Yes your right we do exspect everyone to speak English. But to be fair we can't learn every lanuage. And it's not just the Aussies and the Pom's who are ignorant the Yanks and Canadians are the same.

There are good and bad experiences to be had in most countries arent there? One of the things that attracted me to my husband in Vietnam was how well he travelled... language can be overcome with hands and eyes, it works for us every time:wubclub:

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There are good and bad experiences to be had in most countries arent there? One of the things that attracted me to my husband in Vietnam was how well he travelled... language can be overcome with hands and eyes, it works for us every time:wubclub:

 

I think maybe the only Citys that Ive been to who don't give much of a toss was Prauge and Riga (Latvia). But thats most probley because they are a little pissed off with the British Stag weekends.

 

But I love India, Bangladesh, Indonesia. people with nothing will stiill great you with a smile and want to talk.


Happy people make dreams come true, miserble people just moan.

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There are good and bad experiences to be had in most countries arent there? One of the things that attracted me to my husband in Vietnam was how well he travelled... language can be overcome with hands and eyes, it works for us every time:wubclub:

 

 

Is he Vietmanise? That Place is top of my list. Unfortunatley Andrea does not have the same passion as me for Asia or traverling past Brighton.


Happy people make dreams come true, miserble people just moan.

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Guest guest37336
I think maybe the only Citys that Ive been to who don't give much of a toss was Prauge and Riga (Latvia). But thats most probley because they are a little pissed off with the British Stag weekends.

 

But I love India, Bangladesh, Indonesia. people with nothing will stiill great you with a smile and want to talk.

 

I know what you mean mate. The one thing that drives me insane is when you walk into a shop/business etc, and the receptionist or whoever can't even be arsed to look up and greet you with a smile. You want to wring their necks. Unfortunately this is becoming much more prevalent in the UK at the moment.

 

'Normally' in Australia you will be welcomed with a smile and a 'Gday, how are you'. I know it doesn't happen ALL the time, but I would say it is more the rule than the exception. I read a thread/post recently where someone said that at times the Aussies can get on your goat because they always say at the checkout etc, 'How are you today', or 'Have a good day'. I know which I would rather have. If I had to choose between a petulant knob who didn't acknowledge my existence and a person who at the very least gives me a smile and a quick chat then this will win hands down everytime.

 

And yes, it is true, that maybe 'some' don't mean what they say, but at least it puts a spring in your step if you have had a really crappy day.

 

Cheers Tony

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Guest siamsusie

 

Is he Vietmanise? That Place is top of my list. Unfortunatley Andrea does not have the same passion as me for Asia or traverling past Brighton.

No John, he is an Australian, I was working in Vietnam and he was travelling.. Thats fair enough John, Brighton is also a good location, love the architecture there! I have been in Asia predominately for 22 years working so I guess I have a passion for it lol. Vietnam is a gorgeous country with wonderful people and I highly recommend it to anyone.. Wishing you & Andrea +bump a wonderful Easter Susie x

 

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well I have only spent 3 weeks there and enjoyed it and felt that everyone was welcoming.I was not subjected to any racism (to be honest it was the first question i was asked by many on my return, as it is quite a common perception a lot non whites have)

 

All the Australians I have met in the UK have been very friendly and once they find out I am married to a fellow Aussie they treat me as if I am one of them!

 

So for me I think you get all sorts of people and as i have said there is no such thing as unique definition britishness there is no defination of an Australian.

 

I didnt put a comment earlier as I was at work and didnt have the time.

Can i ask what your ethnicity is salma?dont even know how to put that without someone thinking im "racist!" tbh,but "i" know im not so i dont care how its construed!:jiggy:


"The problem with neo conservative capitalism and it's insatiable greed for more wealth and disparity amongst the populace,is that it ended up being the catalyst for the great depression and modern recession"

 

Me,tonight:wubclub:

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Guest chris955

I have found good and bad in every country I have been to, most people in cities are too busy to bother about others. I do think the laid back easy going Aussie thing is exaggerated especially when they get behind the wheel of a car. We found in America people were friendly but 'have a nice day' meant nothing to them, they no more care if we had a good day than an Aussie saying the same thing. Our Aussie friends are no more or less happy than our friends in England.

We found the Germans didn't try to 'help' if we were having trouble making ourselves understood whereas the Dutch were brilliant.

The friendliest people we found were those in Singapore.

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I have found good and bad in every country I have been to, most people in cities are too busy to bother about others. I do think the laid back easy going Aussie thing is exaggerated especially when they get behind the wheel of a car. We found in America people were friendly but 'have a nice day' meant nothing to them, they no more care if we had a good day than an Aussie saying the same thing. Our Aussie friends are no more or less happy than our friends in England.

We found the Germans didn't try to 'help' if we were having trouble making ourselves understood whereas the Dutch were brilliant.

The friendliest people we found were those in Singapore.

 

Odd, that; many times when confronted by enquiring Germans, I get the feeling of "Vee coudn't beat you, but vee vill treat you as underlings"...Same with the Dutch, but their attitude seems to be more of a "we will tolerate you, but don't bother befriending us"

 

But, they were only the tourists on a tight schedule.

 

The country Australians are the salt-of-the-earth blokes and would go out of their way to help strangers.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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Guest siamsusie
Odd, that; many times when confronted by enquiring Germans, I get the feeling of "Vee coudn't beat you, but vee vill treat you as underlings"...Same with the Dutch, but their attitude seems to be more of a "we will tolerate you, but don't bother befriending us"

 

But, they were only the tourists on a tight schedule.

 

The country Australians are the salt-of-the-earth blokes and would go out of their way to help strangers.

 

Cheers, Bobj.

:laugh: look out for your pm and cover your arse:hug:

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Guest siamsusie
:laugh: look out for your pm and cover your arse

Cheers for your pm Bob you can remove the book now:laugh::hug: love susie xx

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Didn't hurt a bit...(says he, cooling a whacked R send):arghh:

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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