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Guest Nodders

Aged Parents and Bridging Visas

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Guest Nodders

My partner of 20 years and I are considering migrating to Australia to be with my daughter and her family. We have looked at the Contributory Parental Visa and its (at the current rate) almost £50,000 cost for both. We don't really want to wait for the Non-Contributory visa to come through and have been looking at the Onshore Aged Parental Visa and Bridging Visa as an option. It is not that £50,000 is out of the question, but it is the balance between a reasonably secure settlement in Oz and a perhaps worrisome one.

 

I am 65, my partner 55, my daughter is my only child. He has none of his own.

 

Can any tell me if this might be a reasonable strategy, if I have missed anything, and any opinion on the pros and cons as it were.

 

We sell up, house and all, and take steps to transfer monies to Australia. We 'go on holiday; to stay with family for a projected two months (lets say). While onshore in Oz we lodge an application for an Aged Parent 804 (?). Upon doing this we would then get an automatic bridging Visa to tide us over for the years until the 804 is granted. Is that right? Is is that simple? Save the vast majority of the £50,000? Any flaws or things to consider?

 

My partner is is quite good health, as am I. But I am on regular medication for arthritis and I believe the drugs are quite expensive. What might the costs might be like for my medication and health? Would I qualify for the reciprocal care programme and would that include my drugs?

 

Any other pros/cons anyone can think of? Has anyone here done this at all?

 

Thank you in anticipation.

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Guest Nodders

Thank you very much Colin, that is very much appreciated. Very much!

 

Nodders

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Guest Nodders

I have read the quoted post and thread. One thing rather puzzles me. Given that it is '...NOT lawful to apply for a tourist visa if the intention is to remain in Australia indefinitely.' What might the correct procedure/Tourist Visa be?

 

Is it feasible (or even advisable!) to simply sell up here and trust we can make the application on landing and then stay. Obviously with such a strategy we can't afford to get anything wrong- we can't afford to get anything wrong

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Guest Guest31881
I have read the quoted post and thread. One thing rather puzzles me. Given that it is '...NOT lawful to apply for a tourist visa if the intention is to remain in Australia indefinitely.' What might the correct procedure/Tourist Visa be?

 

Is it feasible (or even advisable!) to simply sell up here and trust we can make the application on landing and then stay. Obviously with such a strategy we can't afford to get anything wrong- we can't afford to get anything wrong

 

 

Ok, it is not lawful to apply for a tourist visa with the intention of staying perminantly.....

 

However if someone arrives on a tourist visa with the intention of returning home, and then after a couple of months decide that they like it that much they want to stay, there is nothing wrong in applying for the new visa then. :biggrin:.

 

Sent you a Personal message

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Guest jenjoshnat

Hi there,

 

My partners parents are hoping to do the same thing as yourselves. They visit us a couple of times a year and on their last visit in December they visited a migration agent, who told them their options would be to come on a so called "holiday" and whilst here apply for a bridging visa until they're granted their contributory aged parent visas, so at this moment in time they have their house up for sale and are hoping to be here permanently within the next few months ( fingers crossed!). But that said, i also feel very nervous for them selling their home before they are given the approval to stay on permanently.........

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Guest Nodders

Yes on the face of it, I feel a little nervous, although its good that at least others are having the same/similar ideas. I hope in works out, and would love to know if and when. We are in South Oz Sept/Oct which might be a bit soon but certainly the following year could see us going for it. Thanks very much for this. Reassuring :)

 

Nods

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Guest Gollywobbler

Hi Nodders

 

You can't have everything in this life!

 

If you don't want risk, don't consider the idea of selling your home in the UK until you have received the Aged Parent sc 804 visas, I would suggest. A decent lettings agent in the UK could tell you what sort of rent your home would be likely to fetch and could deal with everything relating to the letting for you.

 

With regard to your arthritis, is it likely to get any worse with the passage of time? I'd suggest a visit to your GP and tell him that you are there to learn the truth, because of what you have in mind, so to forget the reassuring patter and to tell you the truth about this. The bottom line is that if your arthritis definitely will become worse, then you need to consider what will happen if:

 

1. You become wheelchair bound so that you need to have adaptations to a home in Oz - eg grabrails in the bathroom, at least one ramp leading to outside the house, maybe fit a shower instead of a bath and all the other practical problems that come with the onset of physical disability. (My mother is in a wheelchair after breaking her back in an accident some years ago, so I have personal experience of knowing what the difficulties can be.)

 

2. Are you likely to need surgery at any stage to replace a hip or a knee? The need for this sort of surgery is most unlikely to be covered under the Reciprocal Health Care Agreement between the UK and Oz. The need for it is also quite likely to encourage the onshore MOC to say that you "do not meet" the medical criteria for permanent migration to Oz. In that event, please see this thread:

 

http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/migration-issues/80749-advice-aged-contibutory-parent-visa.html

 

4. Personally I think that anyone who is considering spending a long time in Oz without getting PR would be daft to try to do without private medical cover as well as relying on the RHCA. However private medical cover has become VERY expensive in Oz for those who do not have PR in Oz:

 

Cheap Parent Visas Part I - Poms In Adelaide

 

BERIA 410 are the experts on the cost of private meds insurance in Oz because many of the holders of the Retirement 410 visa are required to maintain private meds insurance as one of the conditions of their visas. The BERIA 410 website is here:

 

BERIA 410 - HOME PAGE & NEWS

 

The website below should enable you to work out the rough costs, too:

 

PrivateHealth.gov.au - Private Health Insurance and Australian Health Fund Information

 

Earlier today, someone asked me about the concessions available AFTER the grant of an Aged Parent 804 visa. I think that the concessions (or lack of them) are equally important prior to the grant of the visa:

 

http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/migration-issues/80995-senior-card-concessions.html

 

None of the available options offers perfection. That would be too much to hope for.

 

With regard to the cost of your drugs, I'd suggest an appointment with a GP whilst you are in South Oz later in 2010. The UK allows drugs to contain a wider range/mixture of compounds than are licenced in Oz. GPs can work out what is in the UK drugs that you have with you if you take the drugs and the leaflets in the boxes to the GP in Oz. The GP can then tell you which drugs he would use in Oz and can tell you their names and what they cost in Oz at the time when you consult the GP.

 

I think you are right in saying that some drugs for arthritis are quite expensive but beyond that, I don't know any details. Pharmacists in the UK have a special book in which they can look up any drug and they can find out what the price for it is in the UK - so it is worth asking your local pharmacist in the UK.

 

I think that arthritis is one of the conditions where there isn't an exact match between what is available in the UK and what is available in Oz, so in Oz I would start by asking a GP, to find out what he would prescribe. If he doesn't know the prices, beetle along to a pharmacist in Oz, armed with the name and the likely dosage according to the GP. The pharmacist can definitely discover the price because he may have to charge it.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Guest kunwar

Hi, information provided by you is really valuable. Please guide if an applicant for Parent Visa under Sub Class 804 can get work permit while on bridging visa.

 

Secondly the cheapest insurance cover available for an applicant for 804 on bridging and the name of the cover/insurance company if possible.

 

Please also suggest which states allow senior card on bridging visa on 804 as I am unable to find on the link send by you.

 

Thanks,

 

Kunwar

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I thought both persons have to be of pensionable age to apply for the 804 offshore visa. Is that not the case?

 

Liz


CPV143 Application acknowledged as received: 24/06/08

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Guest Gollywobbler
I thought both persons have to be of pensionable age to apply for the 804 offshore visa. Is that not the case?

 

Liz

 

Hi Liz

 

The subclass 804 Aged Parent visa is the onshore version of the offshore non-contributory sc 103 visa.

 

Only one of the Parents has to be "aged" for the subclass 804 visa. A man has to be 65 or over. For women there is a sliding scale according to their date of birth but I think that the present threshold age for a woman is about 64.5 years old.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Guest Gollywobbler
Hi, information provided by you is really valuable. Please guide if an applicant for Parent Visa under Sub Class 804 can get work permit while on bridging visa.

 

Secondly the cheapest insurance cover available for an applicant for 804 on bridging and the name of the cover/insurance company if possible.

 

Please also suggest which states allow senior card on bridging visa on 804 as I am unable to find on the link send by you.

 

Thanks,

 

Kunwar

 

 

Hi Kunwar

 

Welcome to Poms in Oz.

 

People who are working are not entitled to Seniors Cards, regardless of their age or locations. It is not possible to have everything in this life.

 

Please guide if an applicant for Parent Visa under Sub Class 804 can get work permit while on bridging visa.

 

What do you mean by a "work permit," please? If you mean "permission to work whilst holding a Bridging Visa," I believe that DIAC are usually quite lenient provided that the Parent-in-waiting can show that s/he would be destitute without being able to work.

 

Or you might be talking about a different scenario. Let us say that the Husband is 87 and his wife is 52. His wife is a Registered Nurse with loads of nursing experience under her belt. In this situation, there is a pretty good chance that a hospital would sponsor the wife for a subclass 457 employer-backed temporary work visa. A 457 visa would allow the Nurse to work full-time for the sponsoring employer. As her Partner on the sc 457 visa, her husband would also be able to work full-time if he wants to and there would be no restrictions on what he can do, whom he can work for etc.

 

In this particular scenario, if the Parents are living in a City such as Brisbane and I were a migration agent (which I'm not) pushing on behalf of the Nurse, I'd be looking for Permanent Residency for her via the employer-skilled ENS visa. If the Parents are living in, say, Townsville in QLD - which is in Regional Oz - I'd be looking for PR via an RSMS visa for the Nurse.

 

The third possibility is that neither Parent has a recognised skill which is in demand in Oz. There is no legal reason why one of the Parents should not become an International Student, with the other Parent as the Student's Partner. Depending on the exact visa (which in turn depends on the course chosen) both Parents would then get limited work rights in Oz. The Student visa route is very expensive for an International Student.

 

Again, IF I were a migration agent (which I'm not) one of my first questions would probably be, "Are you two sure that you can't afford Contributory Aged Parent visas instead? If you can afford for one of you to become an International Student, surely you can't be that short of money?"

 

I'd probably try to push any couple except waiting applicants for the offshore CPV 143 or CPV 173 away from the Student Visa idea. For some CPV applicants it might be useful but for the majority of CPV applicants, my feeling is that the odd trip to Singapore or somewhere would probably be cheaper and nicer unless one of the Parents really does have a burning desire to learn something new. Even if the burning desire existed, I'd probably say, "Wait until you have Permanent Residency via the Contributory Parent visas. That way, you could do the course as a domestic student - which would be a lot cheaper - plus there would be no restrictions on how many hours you can work for."

 

However it all depends on the skills of the Parents, how old they both are, how much money is sloshing around and so forth. I think Parents are like any other visa applicants - it comes down to a whole basket of factors and a migration agent would need to discuss all the possible scenarios with the family in some depth, in order for them to work out what they think would be best for themselves.

 

Secondly the cheapest insurance cover available for an applicant for 804 on bridging and the name of the cover/insurance company if possible.

 

I don't know the names of any of the private insurers in Oz. I live in the UK. The Government's Private Health website seems to give lots of names of the providers. Then you have to fiddle with the various calculators because a person's age and medical history will be relevant to how much the premium will be.

 

I only have two bits of information to go on, both of them nearly a year old. They'll do as a very rough guide but I'd be looking for something much more specific as well as the 2010 figures because I suspect that the premiums are going upwards.

 

All that I really know is that in about 2008, the legislation relating to private health insurance was altered. I don't know any of the legal details. Apparently the effect of the change was that private medical insurance in Oz is now very expensive for someone who does not have Permanent Residency in Oz.

 

BERIA 410 represents self-funded retirees in Australia who are on the subclass 410 Retirement Visa. It is a temporary visa which gives Temporary Residency in Oz. Most of the holders have to have private health insurance as a condition of holding the sc 410 visa, even if the holder is from the UK which has a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement with Oz. According to NERIA 410 about a year ago, the change in the legislation meant that a British couple both aged 65 and both perfectly healthy would be paying about $6,000 AUD for the couple for 12 months of cover. That is very expensive. Apparently that cost would NOT cover the provision of life-lengthening drugs such as Tamoxifen, which is for cancer and I understand that it is a very expensive drug.

 

BERIA 410 give links to the Medibank website. I imagine that Medibank is probably a private health insurer. The organisers of BERIA 410 are very beady - they don't miss anything that might help their members. My guess is that BERIA 410 would probably have a block policy with one of the private health insurers in Oz. If there if a block policy, membership of BERIA 410 probably entitles the person seeking the health insurance to a discount on the annual premium but I don't know any of the details of what BERIA 410 have actually done.

 

The second snippet that I know is from a British Contributory Parent sc 143 visa holder. Before their CPV 143s were granted in 2008 or 2009, this chap and his wife spent much of their waiting time in Oz on subclass 676 long-stay tourist visas. They chose to top up their RHCA entitlement with private medical insurance as well. The man said that the premiums he was paying for the private health insurance dropped by 50% once they obtained Permanent Residency via their CPV 143s.

 

Whatever the whole private health insurance game entails, it does seem to be very expensive for people who do not have Permanent Residency in Oz, so I think the details have to be worked out very carefully for the couple concerned.

 

Please also suggest which states allow senior card on bridging visa on 804 as I am unable to find on the link send by you.

 

You won't find anything on the websites. Again, the only information that I have is purely anecdotal, based on what I have been told and on nothing else. I have heard that Seniors Card in South Australia are pretty relaxed and flexible. I have heard that Seniors Card in NSW are the exact opposite. I understand that in NSW, the organisers of the Seniors Card demand sight of the person's passport and if the visa in the passport does not prove Permanent Residency then the Seniors Card will not be available to the person at all, regardless of age.

 

I don't know about the Policies adopted by any of the other States/Territories.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Guest kunwar

Thanks a lot Gill,

It's really valuable information.

I'm only worried as if my parents say that they would be destitute without being able to work, DIAC may not refuse application saying that Sponsor is not able to support parents till decision of application, how will hee support after PR as parents will not be able to access social services and pension for 10 years even after PR. Please guide if my parents should apply for work rights or there is any risk involved as I mentioned above.

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Guest Gollywobbler
Thanks a lot Gill,

It's really valuable information.

I'm only worried as if my parents say that they would be destitute without being able to work, DIAC may not refuse application saying that Sponsor is not able to support parents till decision of application, how will hee support after PR as parents will not be able to access social services and pension for 10 years even after PR. Please guide if my parents should apply for work rights or there is any risk involved as I mentioned above.

 

Hi Kunwar

 

Are your Parents in Oz at the moment? It is quite possible that they are - eg they might hold a sc 457 visa at the present time and may have held several sc 457 visas but they believe that a new one would not be granted the next time around.

 

If they are not in Oz at the moment, which visa do you propose to use to get them into Oz in the first place, please? That could well be your first stumbling block with the whole thing.

 

I can see what you are getting at with your concerns about the Sponsor of an Aged Parent sc 804 application. However that visa requires that there must be a Sponsor. A Bridging Visa does not require a Sponsor. If the Australian Parliament does not like that fact, the Australian Parliament can lump it. They decided on the legislation about Bridging Visas, not you or I.

 

DIAC do tend to be very lenient towards Parents who are in Oz on Bridging Visas, awaiting non-contributory Aged Parent visas. I think it is a situation in which Policy is torn in two different directions.

 

On the one hand, the Australian tax-payer would complain if too many immigrants' Parents went rushing to Oz at almost no cost to Parents and their immediate families. The deal is carefully thought out by the Australian Government.

 

Health Costs: Contributory Parents are required to make an up-front Contribution of 12.5% of their predicted future health-care costs in Australia, according to the Australian Government Actuary, who writes the relevant reports and does the calculations every year:

 

Publications — Australian Government Actuary

 

The original Report talks about this 12.5% and it says that non-contributory Parents or Aged Parents only have to pay 0.5% of this health care cost.

 

Social Security Costs: You are quite right in saying that no new migrant to Oz can claim the Aged Pension until they have lived in Oz for not less than 10 years. However ALL new migrants can obtain almost all other Social Security Benefits after only 2 years of living in Oz with Permanent Residency.

 

Most Parents are able to claim Commonwealth Seniors Health Cards after they have had PR in Oz for not less than 2 years, for example:

 

Commonwealth Seniors Health Card

 

(Please note that Seniors Card and the CSH Card are two different cards. The CSH Card is administered by Centrelink. Seniors Cards are issued by the various States. There is a strict waiting time of 2 years for the CSH Cards. There is no waiting time for Seniors Cards, so it is important not to confuse these two Cards with each other.)

 

The lack of access to the Age Pension can be overcome. ANY Parent (contributory or non-contributory) can claim Special Benefit if s/he falls on hard times after his/her first two years in Oz:

 

Special Benefit

 

With Parents, the Sponsor's obligations are only supposed to last - and only do last - for that first two years when the Parent has PR in Oz. The idea of Sponsorship is wholly and solely that it covers that first two years.

 

After the two years, teh interests of Parents split between the Contributory Parents and the non-contributory Parents. (CPs and NCPs, to save continually typing long words.) CPs have to watch it with claiming Special Benefit because Special Benefit is recoverable from the CPV Bond, which lasts for 10 years not 2 years. The CPV Bond is part & parcel of he CPV Assurance of Support, which lasts fir 10 years, not 2 years.

 

NCPs also have to have an Assurance of Support and a much smaller BCP Bond. However both of the AoS and the NCP Bond disappear after only 2 years in Oz with both of the NCP visas.

 

Therefore many non-contributory Parents will hurtle straight to Centrelink as soon as the first two years with PR in Oz has expired (or at any rate, in their shoes I would definitely do so!) They've waited a hell of a long time for their visas, regardless of where they have done the waiting. Payback time then arrives in my view.

 

If Contributory Parents fall on hard times, the amount that Centrelink pay out in Special Benefit will be recovered from the CPV Bond and the Assurer if Support between them. However the Aussie Goverment will not allow a Permanent Resident of Australia to starve. With an NCP who claims Special Benefit after the 2 year initial exclusion preriod, there is nobody for Centrelink to claw the money back from because the AoS and the NCP Bond have both disappeared.

 

The Australian Parliament decided that this is how the whole thing should work and it does work as they intended it to work.

 

The other side of the Policy coin is this: Somebody who is on a Bridging Visa now and will obtain an Aged Parent visa in due course will also be entitled to go trotting along to Centrelink in due course. If you allow this NCP applicant to work whilst he is on a Bridging Visa fior several years, he will be working in Oz legally and therefore he will also be paying tax on that income in Oz. If you let him work whilst he is on the Bridging Visa, his tax will pay some of the money that he would be entitled to claim from Centrelink later.

 

The sight of a starving Parent-in-waiting sleeping in a shop doorway would have the Aussie Voter asking some searching questions as well - along the lines of the Australian Government and their respect for Human Rights, I expect....

 

It is easier (and in the end more profitable for the Government) to allow a Parent in waiting to work if he needs to do so.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Guest kunwar

Thanks a lot Gill,

 

Sorry for the inconvenience due to incomplete information. Actually this is the first time I have joined such type of site and found very useful. Slowly I will learn everything in proper manner.

 

My parents came to Australia on 676 visitor visa for one year with condition of 90 days stay on each entry and they applied Parent Visa 804 and got Bridging Visa.

 

Now they are staying with me but my father is bored staying at home without work and want to go back to India if they do not get work rights here.

 

Thanks is a small word for such a valuable information.

 

Best wishes,

 

Kunwar

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Guest Gollywobbler
Thanks a lot Gill,

 

Sorry for the inconvenience due to incomplete information. Actually this is the first time I have joined such type of site and found very useful. Slowly I will learn everything in proper manner.

 

My parents came to Australia on 676 visitor visa for one year with condition of 90 days stay on each entry and they applied Parent Visa 804 and got Bridging Visa.

 

Now they are staying with me but my father is bored staying at home without work and want to go back to India if they do not get work rights here.

 

Thanks is a small word for such a valuable information.

 

Best wishes,

 

Kunwar

 

Hi Kunwar

 

Thanks for your speedy reply.

 

In order to work, your father has to apply to DIAC for Permission to Work. For this, he would need to use Form 1005:

 

http://www.immi.gov.au/allforms/pdf/1005.pdf

 

He would want unlimited permission to work - he does not hold a Student visa.

 

According to Form 1005:

 

Generally, if you are seeking unlimited permission to work, you should demonstrate a compelling need to work, either because of financial hardship, or because you have been sponsored or nominated for employment in an ‘approved appointment’ as part of a substantive visa application.

The italics are mine, purely for emphasis. Please tell your Dad this from me: he will be less bored if he thinks up some really compelling reasons based on financial hardship!

 

I'd suggest:

 

1. First, let Dad think up something better than "I am bored....."

 

2. If he were my father, I would tell him that once he has done some thinking of his own, he should then go to the nearest DIAC office in person, armed with the paperwork that proves who he is, that he and your Mum are on Bridging visas etc.

 

3. Tell him to find out what they consider "financial hardship" to be etc whilst saying as little as possible himself, I suggest.

 

Please reassure him that I am sure that this can be sorted out and that he would be able to work in Oz if he wishes, but I think he needs to say something other than, "I am bored....!"

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Hi Liz

 

The subclass 804 Aged Parent visa is the onshore version of the offshore non-contributory sc 103 visa.

 

Only one of the Parents has to be "aged" for the subclass 804 visa. A man has to be 65 or over. For women there is a sliding scale according to their date of birth but I think that the present threshold age for a woman is about 64.5 years old.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

 

Thanks Gill, that's really good to know.

 

Liz x


CPV143 Application acknowledged as received: 24/06/08

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Guest kunwar

Thanks a lot Gill,

 

We will think a better statement and discuss with you before going to DIAC. Thanks for your kind help.

 

Kunwar

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Hi Gill:

This message is apropos of nothing more than just to say I'm so full of admiration and respect for the way in which you put your whole heart and soul into all your replies to threads from people you don't even know! Honestly, Gill, whenever I see a posting from Gollywobbler while browsing through all the different forums (PomsinOz/PomsinAdelaide etc), including those which interest me (RRVs/Aged Parent Visas in all their forms) I always stop to read through your responses to those seeking help -- and, quite frankly, I'm gobsmacked at the seemingly bottomless fount of knowledge that is you!

 

You must give such a lot of hope and comfort to so many confused, often despairing people at times - and all for the sake of being able to help someone. Truly, I am humbled at such generosity of time, knowledge - and yes, love - of your fellow human beings! And for that I salute you.

 

And you don't even get paid for it! WOW!! That is truly awesome..... You are one Very Special Person. God bless you, girl!

 

PS: How do you find time to live your own life, when you spend so many precious hours on the welfare and care of others'? After all, it's not as though you provide 'standard' replies to people's queries which you could send at the press of the enter button; each and every one of your posts is a 'one-off'. Truly, you're an angel without wings!!!

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Guest dundazi

Does anyone know of a visa that enable me my husband and I to stay in Oz to apply for AP sub 804 as all the visas applied for (Visitors V all seem to have no furthur stay or no substansive visa can be applied for. so feel snookered at every turn..

We are here at the moment on such a v.v. and so therefore can't apply as this again is on the V.Visa Help

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Guest spursno1

Hi Dundazi my wife and i are wanting to do exactly as you are proposing to do.I have read somewhere on this site that if you apply on visa 679-90 day one they never place a restriction on you applying for other visas like they do on the 676 one.

Pehaps someone would like to comment? Spursno1

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Guest dundazi

Hi spurs no 1 the 679 visa must be the wrong one that is for a family member to sponser you.

do you mean a 676 E visa stbrides21 @yahoo.co.uk Maureen

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Guest spursno1

Hi Dundazi many thanks for your reply.Yes I did mean the 676 visa -great you pointed this out to me.We have booked tickets with emirates for April and they applied for the visas as prt of the booking We do not get the actual visa it is just donr in the system--w hope spursno1

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Guest dundazi

Hi there spurs no1

 

Fantastic regarding your trip in April all the very best.

 

I take it you are going on the 676 and then intend to go in for the 804 ?

 

Do you have to wait till the the 676 is due to finish or can you do this anytime during the 90day period?

 

I see the DIAC have decided to change things to individual payments for each dependant when I am not too sure. best to get in quick they are also or have put up payments due to economic crisis.....

 

David is 67 I am 65 so we need to do this soon I think.

 

Do you know when the assurence of support payment $10.000 is due to be paid? or as we suspect

it is a payment that May be asked for or may not....this is then kept by them for two years before being given back.

 

We are also under the immpression that during that two years you actually get issued permenant residence but no access to goverment pensions or the actual visa for then 15 years.

 

Thats how we see it. if that is so........ that in its self that is a security blanket for that period they would hardley likley throw you out because health could then be against you because of old age problem when 80ish. what do you think......

regards Maureen and David

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Guest spursno1

Hi Maureen and David thanks for your reply It looks as though you are going to do the same as us,so good luck with everything.

To answer your questions from what we have learned so far.You can make application at any time whilst in oz,but might be prudent to wait a few weeks into your 3 month visa time.The sponser must give undertaking to provide support,accomodation and financial assistance during first 2 years.AOS starts from date of granting your visas and at to-days fees is $5000 for main applicant and $2000 for next one.You have to wait 2 years for most social security payments and 10 years for age and disability payments.You can of course claim a lot of medical payments under Medicare by way of the reciprocal system: all costs in non private hospitals(i have had open heart surgery in a Perth hospital-and it was free)Try and register with a Dr who bulk bills but you have to pay towards any drug issues hope all goes well for you Mavin and Jacky

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