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The Brand New PIO Parents Visa thread

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8 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

To say it’s better to apply for 864 may not be true. Sure they would get a bridging visa to stay in Australia but they would also spend the rest of their lives on that bridging visa as the 864 has a 30 year wait.  There are many disadvantages being on a bridging visa and they need careful consideration before they can decide it’s a better option.  I’d say you need a vast amount of money for it to be a better option.  No access to any state benefits etc so if you ever need aged care and none of us know we won’t then you’ll have to pay for it yourself.  Just one of many examples of the pitfalls of a bridging visa. 

I think you might be confusing the subclass 864 visa with the 804 visa ...

Best regards.

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Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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3 minutes ago, Alan Collett said:

I think you might be confusing the subclass 864 visa with the 804 visa ...

Best regards.

I think you may be right 😳

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15 hours ago, Radagast said:

3) I understand that if 1 parent is granted a 143, that parent can then sponsor the other parent 5 years after the 143 is granted? I do not wish to assume incorrectly but I imagine that for most parent visa applicants, after the grant they will be splitting their time between Australia and their country or origin (rather than living in Australia full-time). In those circumstances, I am surprised not to see more people applying for a single 143, having the other parent visit on a visitors visa while the first parent spends part of each of the first 5 years in Australia,

If a parent wishes to have a long stay of, say, three months every year, then that is easily achieved using tourist visas, so most people don't even think about the 143 visa until they're ready for a permanent move (which is why it's such a shock when they discover the actual waiting time).

The flaw in your theory, above, is that the first parent can be granted a 143, and then sponsor the second parent's application.  But the second parent's application will not be granted instantly - they will have to wait in the same queue as everyone else.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Radagast said:

4) I understand the timeframe from submission of application to visa grant is now well over 5 years for a 143, possibly 7? Is this accurate, and is there any way it could improve? This is absolutely incredible where such large sums of money are being required supposedly for a fast processing time.

The money is not for a fast processing time.  The money is to make a small contribution towards the high medical and social security costs incurred by aged parents.  The government intended to discontinue the non-contributory visas altogether, so it was never intended to be a choice of "pay this and get processed faster" it was  meant to be the only option.  The legislation has not gone through though.

I appreciate that it's hard for mixed marriages.   However, immigrants who actually NEED to bring aged parents to Australia are only a small percentage of the migrant pool.   Many migrants, (especially historically when families were bigger) have brothers and sisters still in the home country to provide care.  Mnny migrants have already lost parents, or have a distant relationship (sometime the very reason they left!).   And some voluntarily return to their homeland to care for their parent, rather than uproot an elderly person from their treasured home and friends.

So yes, if parents are not welcome, then Australia risks losing that small percentage of migrants - but let's not forget, for every migrant who  goes home, there are hundreds more applying for visas every day.    It's not as if Australia is desperate for new migrants and can't get enough.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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7 hours ago, Marisawright said:

 

The flaw in your theory, above, is that the first parent can be granted a 143, and then sponsor the second parent's application.  But the second parent's application will not be granted instantly - they will have to wait in the same queue as everyone else.

They don’t apply for another 143 - they apply for a partner visa which  is a lot quicker than 143- 


143 lodged 21 June 2017

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, LindaH27 said:

They don’t apply for another 143 - they apply for a partner visa which  is a lot quicker than 143- 

Quicker but not instant.  

Edited by Tulip1

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7 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

Quicker but not instant.  

No but if they apply onshore they get a bridging visa to stay onshore whilst waiting  


143 lodged 21 June 2017

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17 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

To say it’s better to apply for 864 may not be true. Sure they would get a bridging visa to stay in Australia but they would also spend the rest of their lives on that bridging visa as the 864 has a 30 year wait.  There are many disadvantages being on a bridging visa and they need careful consideration before they can decide it’s a better option.  I’d say you need a vast amount of money for it to be a better option.  No access to any state benefits etc so if you ever need aged care and none of us know we won’t then you’ll have to pay for it yourself.  Just one of many examples of the pitfalls of a bridging visa. 

Hi all,

Is anyone aware if parents become ineligible for 143 if they become over 67(pension age) by the time of visa application outcome comes?

Main applicant in my case might be over 67 by the time our visa gets processed?

Any help would be welcome.


143 Applied April 2019

143 Acknowledgement Received May 2019

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1 minute ago, chintu said:

Hi all,

Is anyone aware if parents become ineligible for 143 if they become over 67(pension age) by the time of visa application outcome comes?

Main applicant in my case might be over 67 by the time our visa gets processed?

Any help would be welcome.

The age of a subclass 143 visa applicant is no consequence to the granting of such a visa.

It is only the onshore parent visa applications under subclass 804 or 864 that have an age requirement.

Best regards.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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4 minutes ago, Alan Collett said:

The age of a subclass 143 visa applicant is no consequence to the granting of such a visa.

It is only the onshore parent visa applications under subclass 804 or 864 that have an age requirement.

Best regards.

That is some good news for me. Thanks Alan, really appreciate your feedback.


143 Applied April 2019

143 Acknowledgement Received May 2019

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4 hours ago, LindaH27 said:

No but if they apply onshore they get a bridging visa to stay onshore whilst waiting  

That’s true.  Still about a 15 year wait then before they can start a life together in Oz. 

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34 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

That’s true.  Still about a 15 year wait then before they can start a life together in Oz. 

True! Could possibly save up the money for 2 parent visas in that time too. 


143 lodged 21 June 2017

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On 06/06/2021 at 21:09, Tulip1 said:

To say it’s better to apply for 864 may not be true. Sure they would get a bridging visa to stay in Australia but they would also spend the rest of their lives on that bridging visa as the 864 has a 30 year wait.  There are many disadvantages being on a bridging visa and they need careful consideration before they can decide it’s a better option.  I’d say you need a vast amount of money for it to be a better option.  No access to any state benefits etc so if you ever need aged care and none of us know we won’t then you’ll have to pay for it yourself.  Just one of many examples of the pitfalls of a bridging visa. 

Seriously? Where do you get that from? 30 years? Oh come on, that's not the case for contributory visas. Atm, over 10 years I would say.

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Hi guys 

I am new to forum, I am applying 143 visa for my mum and dad..

Thanks in advance if I get my questions answered 

1. My parents are onshore on bridging visa as we have applied for Visa 600 extension.. is it okay to apply 143 Visa?

2. Me and my sister is PR in Australia, I am sponsoring them.. Does anyone have to fill Form 47A? 
 

3. If Some documents are left, will department will ask for the documents that are missed?

4. How to calculate Internet Visa Charge?

Appreciate your replies

Thanks

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