Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

Guest guest36187

The Brand New PIO Parents Visa thread

Recommended Posts

thank you for your post audiopip,found it very interesting,we are contemplating a cpv,and trying to decide,is spending that much money really a good idea,

we are both 59 and 60,by the time we get our cpv,can we ever get that money back by working,i doubt it.

yes we want to be here with our family,but at what cost,what to do ??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
We came out here on a CPV in November 2005. We are both in our fifties and did not have jobs pre arranged, despite two years of trying. By the time we take into account loss of earnings, removal fees, bond money, visa and other costs the whole experience has probably cost around 100KUKP.

 

I would say to anyone contemplating doing this not to underestimate the financial and emotional costs. It is a long and difficult journey. However, as of April we are finally Aussie citizens and my daughter has presented us with a wonderful little grandson, so we are feeling better about it lately.

 

Everyone is different, so it is hard to generalise, but many times during the journey we really regretted having started it. Of course, once you are 'in' and have spent a shed load of money, its much harder to back out.

 

The best bit of advice we had was from my best friend as we waited to get on the plane. He said 'look after and be kind to each other'. Wise words indeed.

Did you find work? My OH and myself are both 57. Having spent our life savings on out CPV we now need to sell our house to be able to move to Australia. We will need to work as neither of us has a particularly good pension. How feasible is it for both or either of us to get work at our age? Probably talking about Perth.

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Hi John, Vron

 

That is a good point, can you ever get the money back by working? I would say probably not unless you can hook a high paid role. You need to have serious emotional or other reasons for coming out here (in my case family/daughter/grandson) and be prepared to make the investment come what may. I have to say that if I knew then what I know now it is 50/50 we would have made the trip. The problem is you cannot evaluate your UK life properly until its gone, then it's too late. Australia is very different in many ways, and you cannot judge it just based on a holiday experience. We came here about 4 times for 4 weeks each time before making the jump and still we didn't understand.

 

I met a POM at the HK airport on about our 3rd trip, he was going back to the UK, had given up, and he reckoned 5 years to learn the country and another 5 to fall out of love with it. I can now understand his view I think, at the time I thought he was mad.

 

Also I have to say that Aussies are fantastic in a crisis, my wife broke her leg and a million people stopped and offered us help, BUT and its a big but, late middle aged, middle class Aussies have a nice time, close family, friends etc and they do not always want to make new ones. In five years we have one Aussie couple who we consider good friends. When you are 20-30 something its different, but 50 something much harder. If you and your partner are stressed (which you will be) and only each other for company, then its easy to fall out, again I speak from bitter experience.

 

We both found (and are still finding) the work thing very hard. Both my wife and I spent our careers in the semiconductor industry, her in sales and me in engineering. When we got here I had had some communications with a company in Sydney and after about 6 months they found me a role, but not the one I was used to. So I at least had some money coming in, but we really would have run out of our savings if that had not happened. After 6 months I managed to find something closer to waht I was used to and left. My wife had to wait about 8 months and then got a job, but the woman who ran the company was how shall I say..a bit strange.... Then she got a job with a software company who expected her to work 24 hrs a day for a pittance and finally with another computer company who after 4 years happy years are trying to put her job in China!

 

So my advice is...

 

Ideally arrange something before you get here, but at our age that is difficult. So you are left with..

 

1) establish as much rapport with employers in your sector before leaving the UK. Tell them what you are trying to do. Something suitable may be in the pipeline, just a question of networking

2) you have to be versatile and probably accept less money. Also be prepared for a long and frustrating search.

3) be aware that most employers here go through agencies. IMO these agencies are worthless, they do not understand either the roles or your capabilities. I really cannot understand how most of them keep going, particulary as they have plush offices and huge numbers of staff. Very odd.

 

Once you engage with the agencies you then waste huge amounts of time and money going to worthless interviews all for nothing. All the jobs I have had in Australia (3 so far!) have been through personal contacts and networking.

 

Cars....when you come out don't do what most people advocate and buy a Falcon or a Commodore. Most Aussies have these as company cars, are not paying for repairs and change them every 2 years. They go wrong, depreciate like hell and the dealers are worse than useless. We learned this the hard way. Buy Mazda, Toyota, or Honda in that order. They don't go wrong, depreciation is lower and the dealers have half a clue. We currently run an oldish Mazda 6. And don't buy a manual, always get an auto. Otherwise you may not be able to resell it easily.

 

I hope this doen't put you off totally, there are some wonderful things out here, but you need to be so so careful.

 

Good Luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A great honest post audiopip, hope you will continue to add to the forum.

 

Agree with your take on friendship for oldies and friendship for the young.

 

Our son & d-i-l only have Australian friends, they have never had a Christmas on their own in 2 years, get lots of wedding invites etc and are perfectly happy. How we get on is hard to predict as they have gained all their friends through work and for us that may not be easy to come by.

 

On cars they had the same experience, bought an old Commodore but really was rubbish, (and he is a mechanic) but they have now chopped that in for a new Mazda 2, which they bought 2 weeks before we came out for a month so we had to drive it like 'learners' again and have a full inspection for damage each night.:rolleyes: The tricky bit for us was we have had an auto car in the UK for the last 10 years and they bought a manual.:wacko:

 

As for work I think we should sometimes all stop and think if we lost our jobs in the UK what kind of work would people our age find here.

 

Regards

Les

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Hi Les,

 

I wholeheartly agree re the jobs as I appreciate things are very sticky in the UK and Europe generally, so in some ways we should be thankful to have jobs- period. However, the nightmare scenario is to sell up, spend all your savings coming here and then not be able to get a job, and sadly that happens all too often and has been happening since the 1860's. If I can stop anyone making that mistake then I will feel happy! For us we still have our UK house which is rented, which covers the huge mortgage, but we can't release any of that, or don't want to because of the exchange rate. To some of course that means we are not proper Aussies! (Just careful ones...)

 

I guess the message is it is very easy to get frustrated with the UK and jump ship without fully examining the alternative consequences. We tried to cover all bases, and we have been OK, but we have come far too close at times. If you worry yourself to sleep every night in the UK for two years before making the jump it is preferable to worrying yourself to sleep every night for five years once you are in Aus and have spent the money!:biggrin:

 

Good Luck, look us up if you come to Melbourne!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest FruitBat

My partner and myself are 65 and 55. One retired the other self employed. Fortunately my small business can be run just as well in Australia as the UK as all done via internet. Neither of us has any family in the UK, just the daughter, granddaughter (and another on way) in Oz.

 

The decision to apply for a CPV-143 wasn't too hard. We have spent maybe 17 or 18 weeks there over the past couple of years. Loved it and being close to them all. We realise that moving to Oz will be very different to visiting but for us its not really a choice. Its family.

 

We do have our insecurities. IF my business goes under where would we be? Yes, we will hopefully have bought the house outright. Yes we will have some savings, but with almost $100,000 AUD going for visa+move they will be depleted.

 

We are financially secure here. In Oz we won't be. But we take the view that whatever comes in the future we will make the best of it. Financially security can't take the place of a better quality of life as a family.

 

Of course, our 'nightmare scenario' is in a few years time if 'the family' decide that Oz isn't for them and return to the UK. Now that's the worry! :) But they have been here for two and a half-years and spend another two years a few years ago backpacking. So here's hoping.

 

All the best

 

FB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Ah yes, thats another issue. Fortunately my daughter is 100% committed to Oz as she has been out here for 10years+ with her work. But shortly after us arriving here she split with her partner and it was a real concern for us, certainly not in the plan. Something else to worry about if you are planning the move!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest junemel
Hi Wennie

 

The authority for the proposition is in DIAC's Policy documents, known as the PAMs. These are published on line but they are not available to you for free unless you go to your local State Library and ask one of the librarians to help you to access the PAMs via Legendcom.

 

The quick and easy way for you to get the confirmation that you seek is to send an e-mail to parents@immi.gov.au giving them your Parents existing file reference number, full names. dates of birth etc.

 

If the same twit who answered the phone answers your e-mail and claims that he still doesn't know which way is "up," please let me know. In that event I will give you the direct contact details for the Manager of the Parents Visa Centre, who definitely does know which way is "up." However an e-mail to the general parents@immi address for the PVC ought to produce an intelligent reply within 48 to 72 hours.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

 

Hi Gill and Wennie,

 

I've got the simliar situation, my parents' 103 was lodged on Aug 2006, and we are now switching to 143, I sent below question to the CO:

I heard from a friend who said that the 2nd installment for 143 is based

on the date we lodged our 103 date, which means that if we were to switch

now we will be paying the rate of 2006, can you please clarify whether this

is true?

 

and here is the response from the CO:

 

No, the 2nd visa application charge is based on the date that you lodge

the 143 application and is not backdated to the 103 lodgement date. So if

you apply for a 143 today the 2nd visa charge will be the amount that it is

on todays date.

 

Hi Gill,

 

Just wondering whether in your case the 103 was lodged prior to 2003? Also if possible would you please kindly give me the manager's contact information ( or send to xhj@hotmail.com if you prefer).

 

Wennie,

 

How did you go with your enquiry? Did you get the same answer?

 

June

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest wennie

Hi Junemel,

 

I have sent them an email last Friday. It has been 5 working days and still no luck. I am getting tired of dealing with public services. USELESS!

 

Gill mentioned that you can access to their mannual guide through a state library system. I am quite interested to find out the info but tied to work at the moment, busy with coming year end reporting etc. will find time in the next few weeks to have a look.

 

When did you lodge application to switch to 143 and how long does it take you to be allocated a CO pls? We have been waiting for almost one month. 1st instalment has been taken out but nothing happened yet, no confirmation letter as yet..

 

would appreciate if you share your info too.. thanks

 

Wennie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone

 

We are considering applying for CPV 173 then convert to CPV 143 as we would be leaving a son in the UK so want to be certain we are doing the right thing for us all.

 

Can anybody tell me, when you actually apply for the visa (regardless of which one) do you have to pay the fee on application. Its so confusing trying to work the finances out :( Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi everyone

 

We are considering applying for CPV 173 then convert to CPV 143 as we would be leaving a son in the UK so want to be certain we are doing the right thing for us all.

 

Can anybody tell me, when you actually apply for the visa (regardless of which one) do you have to pay the fee on application. Its so confusing trying to work the finances out :( Thanks

 

Hi PhoebeW

 

When you apply for the 173 the initial Visa Application Charge is the same as for the 143, currently a one off charge for both applicants of about $1705. You do not pay the second visa application charge until you get a case officer and shortly before the visa is granted and the fee is currently $20595 per person which is what you would pay if you had applied for the 173 in this year. It is taking about 15 to 18 months at the moment to get a case officer.

 

You than get two years on the temp 173 and before the two years are up you must apply for the permanent 143. I understand that it is taking about 4-6 months at the moment to convert from the 173 to the 143. The initial VAC for converting is $230 and then a second VAC of $13,730 per person, plus an Assurance of Support of $14,000 per couple.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi PhoebeW

 

When you apply for the 173 the initial Visa Application Charge is the same as for the 143, currently a one off charge for both applicants of about $1705. You do not pay the second visa application charge until you get a case officer and shortly before the visa is granted and the fee is currently $20595 per person which is what you would pay if you had applied for the 173 in this year. It is taking about 15 to 18 months at the moment to get a case officer.

 

You than get two years on the temp 173 and before the two years are up you must apply for the permanent 143. I understand that it is taking about 4-6 months at the moment to convert from the 173 to the 143. The initial VAC for converting is $230 and then a second VAC of $13,730 per person, plus an Assurance of Support of $14,000 per couple.

 

Hi Lindsay

 

Thankyou so much for that:smile:

Now I just have to try and work the finances out :wideeyed:

Just about the $14000 Assurance of support per person, if for some reason you have to 'dip' into it and it runs out............then what:sad:

 

Sorry about all the questions but I am just starting out :arghh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Gollywobbler
Hi everyone

 

We are considering applying for CPV 173 then convert to CPV 143 as we would be leaving a son in the UK so want to be certain we are doing the right thing for us all.

 

Can anybody tell me, when you actually apply for the visa (regardless of which one) do you have to pay the fee on application. Its so confusing trying to work the finances out :( Thanks

 

Hi Phoebe

 

Whether you choose a CPV 173 or the CPV 143, the price of the 1st Instalment will be $1,735 AUD and it will cover both you and your OH. The big money is the 2nd Instalment for each of you, but paying that is the very last thing to be done before your CPVs are granted.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Gollywobbler

Hi again Phoebe

 

Just about the $14000 Assurance of support per person, if for some reason you have to 'dip' into it and it runs out............then what

 

The AoS Bond is $14,000 AUD for a couple, not per person. The breakdown is $10,000 for the main visa applicant and $4,000 for his/her spouse or partner.

 

If you have to "dip into it" and it runs out but Centrelink continue to pay you Benefits then the drill is as follows:

 

1. At the end of the 10 year Bond/AoS period, Centrelink take the first $14,000.

 

2. If that is not enough to cover the debt payable to Centrelink then Centrelink can look to your Assurer(s) of Support to make up the shortfall. Up to 3 individuals can club together to provide an AoS. If more than one individual provides it, the liability is joint and several, meaning that each Assurer is personally liable for the whole of the debt.

 

Assurance of Support

 

When you examine the list of recoverable Benefits, however, almost none are Benefits which a middle aged person or couple would be able to claim in the first place. Special Benefit is about the only possibility in your own situation or my mother's situation.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi again Phoebe

 

 

The AoS Bond is $14,000 AUD for a couple, not per person. The breakdown is $10,000 for the main visa applicant and $4,000 for his/her spouse or partner.

 

If you have to "dip into it" and it runs out but Centrelink continue to pay you Benefits then the drill is as follows:

 

1. At the end of the 10 year Bond/AoS period, Centrelink take the first $14,000.

 

2. If that is not enough to cover the debt payable to Centrelink then Centrelink can look to your Assurer(s) of Support to make up the shortfall. Up to 3 individuals can club together to provide an AoS. If more than one individual provides it, the liability is joint and several, meaning that each Assurer is personally liable for the whole of the debt.

 

Assurance of Support

 

When you examine the list of recoverable Benefits, however, almost none are Benefits which a middle aged person or couple would be able to claim in the first place. Special Benefit is about the only possibility in your own situation or my mother's situation.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

 

Hi Gill

 

So would my daughter and son in law ( who are permanant residents and are 'supporting' our visa) have to be our Assurer's and what if they personally didnt have the funds:unsure: and

 

would it be cheaper applying for the 143 straight off rather than the 173 then the 143??

 

Thanks again

Phoebe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Gollywobbler
Hi Gill and Wennie,

 

I've got the simliar situation, my parents' 103 was lodged on Aug 2006, and we are now switching to 143, I sent below question to the CO:

I heard from a friend who said that the 2nd installment for 143 is based

on the date we lodged our 103 date, which means that if we were to switch

now we will be paying the rate of 2006, can you please clarify whether this

is true?

 

and here is the response from the CO:

 

No, the 2nd visa application charge is based on the date that you lodge

the 143 application and is not backdated to the 103 lodgement date. So if

you apply for a 143 today the 2nd visa charge will be the amount that it is

on todays date.

 

Hi Gill,

 

Just wondering whether in your case the 103 was lodged prior to 2003? Also if possible would you please kindly give me the manager's contact information ( or send to xhj@hotmail.com if you prefer).

 

Wennie,

 

How did you go with your enquiry? Did you get the same answer?

 

June

Thanks

 

Hi June

 

Welcome to Poms in Oz.

 

I have sent you an e-mail in the last hour, giving you the contact details that you asked for.

 

My mother didn't get involved in switching from a Parent visa to a Contributory Parent visa. Via Mum, I've been involved with Parent migration ever since 1993 but it is a very long story, all to do with what happens when the Parent has a step-child, as Mum has.

 

The legal situation concerning the "Step-child and the Balance of Family Test" was eventually clarified in 2003 and accepted by DIAC in 2004. I applied for a CPV 143 for Mum in 2005 and it was granted in 2006. CPV applications only took 9 months back then. They now take 18 to 24 months on average.

 

None of what happened to us is relevant to you, though, so let us focus on your own Parents' situation instead, I suggest.

 

The CP Visas started on 1st July 2003. Non-contributory Parent visas have been around since Noah was a nipper. The idea of CPVs took a long time to get off the ground. The Government hoped that there would be a massive rush from the Queue for non-contributory Parent visas to the new CPV scheme but the expected rush did not happen, in spite of an incentive to switch that the Government offered.

 

The incentive was that if the Parent had a non-contributory Parent visa application in the pipeline, they could withdraw that and switch to an application for a new CPV instead without having to pay another 1st Instalment. Also, the Parent's Queue Date would be honoured, meaning that most of them would leap-frog more recent applicants who had requested a CPV from the start.

 

In 2008, word reached my ear that there was also an incentive in the 2nd Instalment. The most that a switching Parent would have to pay for the 2nd Instalment would be whatever amount was payable for the CPV second instalment at the time of the original non-contributory Parent visa application, or $25,000 AUD per parent if the original application was made before the 2003/2004 Financial Year.

 

I had not heard about this second part of the concession/incentive before and I was sceptical about whether the idea was real, so I e-mailed Phil Lovering to check what I had heard. Phil was Mr Parent Visas at the time but he retired on 30th June 2009.

 

Phil replied to me and confirmed that the claim that I had heard on the forums was true.

 

OK. The idea must be in the PAMs - the Policy/Procedures Advice Manuals - because it is not in the legislation and I have never seen the claim being made on the DIAC website either. I'm not a migration agent so I am too stingy to pay for an annual subscription to the PAMs, via Legend, on which they are held:

 

LEGENDcom

 

If I were going to set up in business as a migration agent for Aussie visas (which I could do in a heartbeat since I do not live in Australia) I would buy a full subscription for Legend immediately but since I'm not interested in the idea of migration agency, I'm not prepared to stump up for a sub to Legend either!

 

According to the microsite for Legend, access to the PAMs is available for free via trotting into any State Library in Australia and I am told that the staff in the State Libraries are exceptionally helpful. I have no idea whether Legend/the PAMs is/are easy to work, though.

 

It might be that DIAC's Policy about the concessions/incentive has changed since Phil Lovering e-mailed me about it in 2008. So the CO who replied to you recently might be right and also, any change might have only happened very recently.

 

I'd double check with the Manager of the PVC just to make sure, though.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Khadine
Useful imformation Khadine, but your agent appears to be in no hurry, is that your wish too?

 

Why does the agent want/need to know an update on your parents money and assets?

 

As the application was placed back in 2008 and with the global financial crisis kicking in, mum and dads financial situation changed as did many others know doubt. So when the application was finally looked at they needed an up date, because the type of visa we had applied for was dependant on their finances to some degree. This is relatively normally as this was a request from the case officer.

 

As far as dates we applied right at the end of the year so we had a long queue of people in front of us and we had a letter from DIAC stating that it would take them at least 18months to view and process the application. So unfortunately, it was out of our hands, however it has worked in our favour because mum and dad have had a lot of loose ends to tie up. So when it was our turn our agent and case office worked together to get mum and dad in before the 30th June this year as that is their cut off date for residency visas. Had we not been granted the visas now, we would have to wait again and placed in the queue. So our agent was very efficient and worked with the our case officer to get it done.:biggrin:

 

But some good news to share - on the Wednesday 23rd mum and dad were made Australian residents!! We are so excited, they can now prepare for the move next year. They have till 28th May 2011 to get their passports stamped. Passports no longer have to have a sticker in them so when they come to Perth we might go and get the sticker put in, just for visual recognition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest tintin

Hi,

 

Apologies for intruding...I'm not actually a Pom...but Hungarian; found this site via searching the net and found this site so useful, especially this thread.

 

My parents are applying for the Contributory Parent Visa and I just received their documents, will send it via courier from Melbourne to Perth on Monday.

 

Will the date of receipt determine if the application falls under the new charges?

 

Thanks for your help.

 

ps. I agree with the milking cows theory...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest wennie
Hi June

 

Welcome to Poms in Oz.

 

I have sent you an e-mail in the last hour, giving you the contact details that you asked for.

 

My mother didn't get involved in switching from a Parent visa to a Contributory Parent visa. Via Mum, I've been involved with Parent migration ever since 1993 but it is a very long story, all to do with what happens when the Parent has a step-child, as Mum has.

 

The legal situation concerning the "Step-child and the Balance of Family Test" was eventually clarified in 2003 and accepted by DIAC in 2004. I applied for a CPV 143 for Mum in 2005 and it was granted in 2006. CPV applications only took 9 months back then. They now take 18 to 24 months on average.

 

None of what happened to us is relevant to you, though, so let us focus on your own Parents' situation instead, I suggest.

 

The CP Visas started on 1st July 2003. Non-contributory Parent visas have been around since Noah was a nipper. The idea of CPVs took a long time to get off the ground. The Government hoped that there would be a massive rush from the Queue for non-contributory Parent visas to the new CPV scheme but the expected rush did not happen, in spite of an incentive to switch that the Government offered.

 

The incentive was that if the Parent had a non-contributory Parent visa application in the pipeline, they could withdraw that and switch to an application for a new CPV instead without having to pay another 1st Instalment. Also, the Parent's Queue Date would be honoured, meaning that most of them would leap-frog more recent applicants who had requested a CPV from the start.

 

In 2008, word reached my ear that there was also an incentive in the 2nd Instalment. The most that a switching Parent would have to pay for the 2nd Instalment would be whatever amount was payable for the CPV second instalment at the time of the original non-contributory Parent visa application, or $25,000 AUD per parent if the original application was made before the 2003/2004 Financial Year.

 

I had not heard about this second part of the concession/incentive before and I was sceptical about whether the idea was real, so I e-mailed Phil Lovering to check what I had heard. Phil was Mr Parent Visas at the time but he retired on 30th June 2009.

 

Phil replied to me and confirmed that the claim that I had heard on the forums was true.

 

OK. The idea must be in the PAMs - the Policy/Procedures Advice Manuals - because it is not in the legislation and I have never seen the claim being made on the DIAC website either. I'm not a migration agent so I am too stingy to pay for an annual subscription to the PAMs, via Legend, on which they are held:

 

LEGENDcom

 

If I were going to set up in business as a migration agent for Aussie visas (which I could do in a heartbeat since I do not live in Australia) I would buy a full subscription for Legend immediately but since I'm not interested in the idea of migration agency, I'm not prepared to stump up for a sub to Legend either!

 

According to the microsite for Legend, access to the PAMs is available for free via trotting into any State Library in Australia and I am told that the staff in the State Libraries are exceptionally helpful. I have no idea whether Legend/the PAMs is/are easy to work, though.

 

It might be that DIAC's Policy about the concessions/incentive has changed since Phil Lovering e-mailed me about it in 2008. So the CO who replied to you recently might be right and also, any change might have only happened very recently.

 

I'd double check with the Manager of the PVC just to make sure, though.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

 

Hi Gill,

I have read from BE user DaveandLinder quoted "The amount of money to be paid for the second visa application charge will be the fee in force at the time of submitting the visa application for subclass 173"

Contributory Parent Visa - Still Sparkling!!! - Part 4 - Page 29 : British Expat Discussion Forum

 

If the above is true, the same scenario should also apply to 103 switching to 143 cases.

 

Hope I will get a reply from parent centre soon.

 

Cheers,:yes:

Wennie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

 

We are looking to go the 173 then 143 route for various reasons.

 

I know the 173 is a 2 year temp visa but if we were granted the 173 and decided we wanted to convert to 143 say after 18 months, could we do that? Also if we were to convert would we have to be 'offshore' i.e. back in the UK

 

Thanks in advance

Phoebe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi PhoebeW

 

You can apply for the 143 permanent any time after the 173 has been granted. We intend to switch to the 143 as soon as we hve raised funds from our house sale. Also you can be either in Australia or the UK to apply to change from the 173 to 143.

 

Further information can be found here:

 

Family - Visas & Immigration

 

and also in Booklet 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Gill

 

So would my daughter and son in law ( who are permanant residents and are 'supporting' our visa) have to be our Assurer's and what if they personally didnt have the funds:unsure: and

 

would it be cheaper applying for the 143 straight off rather than the 173 then the 143??

 

Thanks again

Phoebe

 

Hi PhoebeW

 

The only extra costs incurred from applying for the temporary visa first would be the additional initial VAC for the 173 to 143 of $230 and you need to get the police checks done again, about £35 each I think.

 

With regard to your Assurer, the Assurer does not necessarily have to be your daughter, anyone who is a permanent resident or citizen of Australia can act as your Assurer. I think what Gollywobbler is saying is that the only kinds of payments that can be claimed for from the AOS are not really the kind of things that we (parents) would want to claim anyone so there would be nothing to worry about. Hope this helps.

 

Please don't worry about all the questions. It's quite difficult when you are just starting out - so much to consider. My daughter emigrated to Oz three years ago and it has taken me this long to gather all the information from reading posts like this.

 

Incidentally, we also have a son here, so we want to be sure of doing the right thing, although he is also thinking of emigrating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi PhoebeW

 

The only extra costs incurred from applying for the temporary visa first would be the additional initial VAC for the 173 to 143 of $230 and you need to get the police checks done again, about £35 each I think.

 

With regard to your Assurer, the Assurer does not necessarily have to be your daughter, anyone who is a permanent resident or citizen of Australia can act as your Assurer. I think what Gollywobbler is saying is that the only kinds of payments that can be claimed for from the AOS are not really the kind of things that we (parents) would want to claim anyone so there would be nothing to worry about. Hope this helps.

 

Please don't worry about all the questions. It's quite difficult when you are just starting out - so much to consider. My daughter emigrated to Oz three years ago and it has taken me this long to gather all the information from reading posts like this.

 

Incidentally, we also have a son here, so we want to be sure of doing the right thing, although he is also thinking of emigrating.

 

Hi Lindsay

 

Thanks for that :smile: I just dont want to feel like I'm 'perstering' people.

It's 3 years for my daughter too. I'm sure my son would love it out there but sadly I dont think my son's future wife (they get married in Nov this year) would entertain the idea too much family on her side :no:. Are you going on the 173 or 143 and if you dont mind me asking what part are you going to and how far off are you.

 

Do you (or anyone} know if the 173 (temp visa) is granted then converted to 143 (perm visa) will you have PR from when you got the 173 or !43:unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Lindsay

 

Thanks for that :smile: I just dont want to feel like I'm 'perstering' people.

It's 3 years for my daughter too. I'm sure my son would love it out there but sadly I dont think my son's future wife (they get married in Nov this year) would entertain the idea too much family on her side :no:. Are you going on the 173 or 143 and if you dont mind me asking what part are you going to and how far off are you.

 

Do you (or anyone} know if the 173 (temp visa) is granted then converted to 143 (perm visa) will you have PR from when you got the 173 or !43:unsure:

 

We are right at the beginning as we hvae just applied for the temporary 173. We have in fact just had the initial visa application charge taken from our credit card account and are awaiting the official acknowledgement which should take another couple of weeks to arrive from Oz. As soon as the 173 is granted this gives you the right to stay in Australia with the same rights as the 143. You only get permanent residence when you get the 143.

 

We are hoping to join our daughter in Perth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We are right at the beginning as we hvae just applied for the temporary 173. We have in fact just had the initial visa application charge taken from our credit card account and are awaiting the official acknowledgement which should take another couple of weeks to arrive from Oz. As soon as the 173 is granted this gives you the right to stay in Australia with the same rights as the 143. You only get permanent residence when you get the 143.

 

We are hoping to join our daughter in Perth.

 

 

I hope all goes well for you :biggrin:

 

My daughter Emma is on the East n the Gold Coast, she has friends who went to Perth and love it.

 

The reason I asked about when the PR starts from is Gill (gollywobbler) sent me a link regarding a Senior Card when you reach 60 which gives you discounts in various places but when you have been a PR you can apply for a Commonwealth Senior Card which helps with prescription charges and our equivalent of Raod Tax so worth knowing :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×