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Defacto 309 - Child health issue

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Guest

Hello,

 

My partner and I are after some much needed advice :biggrin:

 

We are hoping to apply for the 309(spousal) visa class asap. My Australian partner and I have been together in the UK for 2 years and have lived together for over a year, all this is straight forward enough. However I have 2 daughters from my previous marriage and both have a genetic hearing impairment from their dad. The eldest daughter has a moderate loss, she will be 10 in May , recieves no additional help at school, no DLA and is 'inline' and above her hearing peers at school. The youngest who is 8 in February is servely deaf has 10 hours 1:1 support in class for numeracy and literacy, this is being reduced as she is also 'inline' with her hearing peers. She also has 60 mins speech therapy a week to keep her speech production skills inline with her hearing peers as her communication level is also the same as any 'normal' child of her age, which is some feat for a child with a serve loss !!! ( Proud mum alert) The girls have no other medical conditions and they only have a yearly hearing test and new ear moulds as and when they out grow the ones they have. They will attend a normal school as they currently do in the UK and we are hoping this should not cause any issues.

 

We have talked to an agent who is willing to take on our case saying that we will need to sign a health waiver form for the girls hearing needs which is not an issue.

 

Do you think that my daughters hearing loss will impact on our visa application as the agent was hinting at about an 80% chance of success?

 

Many thanks

 

Tracey :jiggy:

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Hi,

I can't help you, but I'm sure that someone will soon.. Medical issues can be quite compex.. I really hope it all works out for you guys :-)


[url="http://www.move2thecoast.com.au

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Guest

Hi, thanks for the positive comment. We are hoping because the girls lead a relatively 'normal' life and will do throughout their adult lives that it won't impact to much on our application. My youngest daughter who has the serve loss communicates normally and hopefully this will work in our favour.

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Oh dear I think my brain is going to implode :wacko:

 

I have searched this forum looking for other people that have applied for visas with dependants suffering from various forms of disablement and the chance of success seems to really vary. We have spoken to a few agents and all seem very willing to take our case on ( and our money) and seem very confidant, is this realistic?

 

I know no one can say for sure that you will be able to get visas, but your comments would be greatly appreciated even just to put my mind at ease a little as we are nearly ready to start the process and sign with an agent.

Many thanks in advance

 

Tracey

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If you have someone with a disability on your application for a visa for heavens sake go to an agent who specialises in disabilities. You can be taken for a ride with some agents who either dont know or who ignore the difficulties that can arise in these cases.

 

Sometimes agents can get you in on a temporary visa with assurances that "it will be fine and you will get a permanent visa" - if you were going to fail the medical for permanency on your first try, you will fail the medical for permanency when you are in Australia and having lugged your kids all the way over here is no argument for staying in the community!

 

Please get good advice - the name usually recommended is George Lombard (no affiliation or personal knowledge) - it is his speciality and he wont promise the earth.

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Guest

Thanks Quoll,

 

I have spoken to about 5 agents but not the one who you have said ( I shall look him up). I have also had long conversations with my youngest daughters teachers, speech therapist and her audiologist, none of them can see her hearing loss affecting her adult life.....

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Guest Gollywobbler

Hiya

 

We have talked to an agent who is willing to take on our case saying that we will need to sign a health waiver form for the girls hearing needs which is not an issue.

 

ABSOLUTELY BLOODY NOT!!!

 

I can competely imagine migration agents acting in such a reprehensible and down-market bloody fashion. NO genuine professional would act so disgustingly. The answer is "No". Don't go NEAR such a revolting set of agents, PLEASE?

 

I can recommmend reputable, responsible, professionally-minded agents - to whom such a revolting and unprofessional idea would never occur, bluntly. It can be done with letters. To require the client to sign anything is the work of a complete amateur.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Guest

Thanks Gill, have sent you a PM :biggrin:

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I have to agree with Quoll, one of the families whose son plays soccer with my son have a disabled child, he is not able to get PR status (currently here on temp visa). Also look into what support you could get here for your child, you will probably have to pay for her continued speech thereapy.

 

As with any medical condition, the more evidence you submit, the better it is with regard to early decision making, provide the reports from consultants, therapists and teachers. What they need to know is what the problem is, how was/is it being treated and what's the prognosis. They're looking at what the costs may be here.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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Hey Ali,

 

Thanks for the reply, all of my youngest daughters feedback is positive, her 1:1 time has been cut as she is inline with her hearing peers(attends normal school) and is average or above on all her optional SAT tests that they love them to sit over here in the UK. As for a prognosis her deafness is likely to stay the same, it impacts little on her day to day life, she will always need to have an annual hearing check and new ear moulds as and when she grows. Her communication and vocab skills are also 'inline' with hearing children and we have the paperwork to back that up :biggrin:

 

It's just knowing what agent to use, and 'health waiver forms issue' and the realistic possability of getting a PR....as moving the girls to Oz then not being successfull with PR would not be ideal.

 

Hopefully it will all go ok considering the issue is minor and is not likely to impact financially on the Australian govt now or in the future.

 

Tracey

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Guest AngieinBrisbane

They CO is assessing the potential cost of any disability on the tax system. With this is mind perhaps it wouldn't hurt to show as much evidence as possible over the last 2 years at home where you have 1) paid yourself out of pocket for treatment/aids and 2) any costs incurred through public health care and/or gov 't spending in regards to the girls hearing impairment.

 

From what you have said they are not segregated from the main stream schooling system which is a strong indicator (in my UNQUALIFIED opinion may I mention) that they are not a burden to the system. I think it would be strongly in your favour to illustrate all costs associated with their condition and outline who currently is responsible for this costs as i mentioned in the last paragraph. It would also be a good first indication to yourself about what risks the CO might find when assesing your application. It might be hard to tell an Aussie CO that current your health system covers x amount of dollars in support, but being honest is going to ensure you get an honest answer.

 

 

Just a question, do the girls use sign language at all? I ask because I know there are some differences between Australian sign language and British sign language (see Wiki: British Sign Language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) I always assumed it was all the same but upon trying tell a deaf coworker some phrases I knew I got quite the confused stare (I know a little bit of American sign) :P

 

I wish you the best of luck with your situation and definitely agree with other posts that a migrant agent specializing in disability would be your key to finding the answers.

 

Angie :)

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Hello,

 

My partner and I are after some much needed advice :biggrin:

 

We are hoping to apply for the 309(spousal) visa class asap. My Australian partner and I have been together in the UK for 2 years and have lived together for over a year, all this is straight forward enough. However I have 2 daughters from my previous marriage and both have a genetic hearing impairment from their dad. The eldest daughter has a moderate loss, she will be 10 in May , recieves no additional help at school, no DLA and is 'inline' and above her hearing peers at school. The youngest who is 8 in February is servely deaf has 10 hours 1:1 support in class for numeracy and literacy, this is being reduced as she is also 'inline' with her hearing peers. She also has 60 mins speech therapy a week to keep her speech production skills inline with her hearing peers as her communication level is also the same as any 'normal' child of her age, which is some feat for a child with a serve loss !!! ( Proud mum alert) The girls have no other medical conditions and they only have a yearly hearing test and new ear moulds as and when they out grow the ones they have. They will attend a normal school as they currently do in the UK and we are hoping this should not cause any issues.

 

We have talked to an agent who is willing to take on our case saying that we will need to sign a health waiver form for the girls hearing needs which is not an issue.

 

Do you think that my daughters hearing loss will impact on our visa application as the agent was hinting at about an 80% chance of success?

 

Many thanks

 

Tracey :jiggy:

You have been badly advised.

 

There is no such thing as a 'health waiver' form.

 

There is a health undertaking form (Google form 815) which requires the visa holder to report for a further medical assessment (and treatment, if indicated) after arrival in Australia. It is sometimes used in cases where 'old' TB is evident and in some other cases.

 

The fact that a visa applicant is not using a particular service (for example - high-level classroom support) could be due to unavailability, cost, or other factors and assertions that such services will not be called upon in Australia would carry weight only if it could be demonstrated that they would not be needed. You cannot avoid this BS by asserting that you will not use the services. Once you are granted visas you are entitled to use them. This policy is under review.

 

Your best strategy is to have the children undertake a full medical examination for migration before you do anything else. I don't like your chances, but to give yourself any chance you should consult a DIAC panel doctor and come armed with specialists' medical reports and educational assessments. If you want a copy of the required format of a specialists' medical report, send an email to visa@pinoyau.com.

 

BTW I raised a child who had an 80 dBA bilateral sensorineural loss. I am glad I did not have to get her a visa to Australia.


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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Good luck with it, The girls sound as if they've achieved so much despite their hearing impairments - you've every right to be a very proud mum. Gill I'm sure will give you the names of some agents who won't take you for a ride, I know these things until you actually start dealing with the agencies concerned can't be 100% but it sounds as though you have lots of positive information regarding how productive and independent the girls lives are.

 

Ali x


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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You have been badly advised.

 

There is no such thing as a 'health waiver' form.

 

There is a health undertaking form (Google form 815) which requires the visa holder to report for a further medical assessment (and treatment, if indicated) after arrival in Australia. It is sometimes used in cases where 'old' TB is evident and in some other cases.

 

The fact that a visa applicant is not using a particular service (for example - high-level classroom support) could be due to unavailability, cost, or other factors and assertions that such services will not be called upon in Australia would carry weight only if it could be demonstrated that they would not be needed. You cannot avoid this BS by asserting that you will not use the services. Once you are granted visas you are entitled to use them. This policy is under review.

 

Your best strategy is to have the children undertake a full medical examination for migration before you do anything else. I don't like your chances, but to give yourself any chance you should consult a DIAC panel doctor and come armed with specialists' medical reports and educational assessments. If you want a copy of the required format of a specialists' medical report, send an email to visa@pinoyau.com.

 

BTW I raised a child who had an 80 dBA bilateral sensorineural loss. I am glad I did not have to get her a visa to Australia.

 

wrussell with all respect, you don't know my childs capabilities, I am a special needs teaching assistant and I work with children that are deaf, austic and have down syndrome. Each child is an individual and has varying degrees as to how they cope with thier disability. My youngest have the label of being serverly deaf, but then her spoken english is the same as a 'normal' child she has some issues at times with her production, a trophy maybe be a 'frophy' when she is not concentrating. The fact that she scores average or above average on all her exams at school also reflect this as does the very few hours support she recieves.

 

Angie, the sign language does vary depending what state you are in. Melbourne is almost the same as bsl, I am a qualified to translate for the deaf and hearing impaired, it's like a regional variation. It's the same within the UK, up North they sign slightly differently to what we do in the South. Both my girls can sign, they don't need to as as I mentioned above to wrussell they both are more than 'inline' with verbal communication.

 

Thsnks again for all the comments I do take them all on board :biggrin:

 

Thank you anyway for you advice

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Guest Gollywobbler
wrussell with all respect, you don't know my childs capabilities, I am a special needs teaching assistant and I work with children that are deaf, austic and have down syndrome. Each child is an individual and has varying degrees as to how they cope with thier disability. My youngest have the label of being serverly deaf, but then her spoken english is the same as a 'normal' child she has some issues at times with her production, a trophy maybe be a 'frophy' when she is not concentrating. The fact that she scores average or above average on all her exams at school also reflect this as does the very few hours support she recieves.

 

Angie, the sign language does vary depending what state you are in. Melbourne is almost the same as bsl, I am a qualified to translate for the deaf and hearing impaired, it's like a regional variation. It's the same within the UK, up North they sign slightly differently to what we do in the South. Both my girls can sign, they don't need to as as I mentioned above to wrussell they both are more than 'inline' with verbal communication.

 

Thsnks again for all the comments I do take them all on board :biggrin:

 

Thank you anyway for you advice

 

Hi Yeahbut

 

I can understand your being defensive about your girls. Every parent is.

 

However Westly is right. What you think about your girls -and what he thinks about the girls - are both irrelevant. What the Medical Officer of the Commonwealth thinks the girls will cost Australia is the only thing that matters. The legislation is set up in such a way that the MOC's opinion is the only one that counts.

 

From what you have said in your PM and later in this thread, it seems that yuor Agent is saying that you "should" be entitled to claim the DIAC Health Waiver (available for Partner and Child Visas mainly) because you have a Partner visa in mind?

 

Personally I think this is simplistic advice. If the MOC decides that one or both girls will be entitled to State Benefits at any stage - or to special assistance at school - then the MOC will say that the costs will be "significant costs" because they would exceed the costs of keeping a non-disabled Aussie going. For a normal visa, those costs are about $21,000 for a migrant's first 3 to 5 years in Oz. When the DIAC Health Waiver comes in to play, the allowable costs increase to about $200,000 over the migrants' working lifetime. However long-term State Benefits come to more than $200K during a working lifetime - wherein is often the rub because the costs are not confined to direct medical etc cost alone.

 

What happens in the UK is irrelevant = the UK is not Australia and they have their own systems for assessing disability - it is all in the Tables of Impairment in the Aussie Social Security Act 1991 and other places. The MOC is a group of Government doctors in Sydney, who are mostly GPs.

 

We get spates of medical enquiries on here. Sometimes several are running - as at the moment. Sometimes there are none.

 

Have you heard of the UN's recent international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities? Australia signed it and Australia has ratified it but I think that Australia used a Protocol with it. I think that the Aussie Govt said that the Convention would apply fully to people who are already in Australia and who have either PR or Citizenship but that it would not apply to Australia's medical requirements for Permanent Migration to Australia.

 

According to the Human Rights lawyers in Australia, the Govt cannot lawfully take this stance. It flies in the face of the intention of the Convention. There is a Senate Comittee in Oz that deals with treaties. They want this Oz Govt proviso investigated fully. That is the Minister for Immi's baby because he is responsible for Aussie Immi Law.

 

The Minister for Immi has set up another Committee to deal with the whole thing. Aussie Immi legislation does not distingiuish between an illbess such as cancer and a disabiliy such as deafness. The Australian Govt simply treats both as a person who will come to Australia at "a cost" if that person is given a PR visa for Oz. Therefore any consideration of disability in this context has to include illness as well.

 

The Inquiry Secretary very kindly noticed that most of the contributors to Poms in Oz are migrants and many of them have medical/disability concerns. The thread is here:

 

http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/migration-issues/67292-have-your-say-health-requirement.html

 

After a slow start, the Inquiry now seems to be going at full swing:

 

http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/mig/disability/index.htm

 

Over 90 Submissions have now been published:

 

http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/mig/disability/subs.htm

 

I've done one but mine deals with the elderly as far as CRPD people are concerned. Loads of others have dealt with children and young people instead and/or different disabilities and/or Himan Rights law in Australia.

 

Loads of the Great & Good in Oz have waded in as well. Almost everyone is criticial of the MOC's autonomy but lack of transparency and lack of uniformity between the different MOC doctors. The Royal College of Australasian Physicians have waded in as well. They say that the migration decisions should not be made (as they currently are) by solo GPs acting alone and that GPs often have no specific training for the conditions that they come across in medical practice. That is OK when the doctor can see that something is wrong and can send the person to a suitable specialist. Is it enough for a mere GP to be able to announce, "Deafness will cause this person to spend a lifetime on State Benefits at a total cost of about $x AUD," though? Personally I think not.

 

I think the Aussie legislation will have to be changed. However George Lombard is an Aussie lawyer, has worked for the Aussie Government etc and is generally very eminent in his field (Immi Law) so far as most of us in the UK are concerned because we haven't heard of that many people in this field, for a start.

 

George reckons that the Senate Inquiry is likely to be a waste of time. He says that DIAC are running an internal Inquiry of their own. He thinks that regardless of what the public Inquiry concludes, DIAC's public servants will spin it and come up with a theory of their own about how to deal with the whole issue. George may very well be right about that. Public Servants in the UK usually do exactly as Goerge says and what the public servants come up with won't be independent - it will be slanted to whatever the Government of the day wants.

 

I want to believe that the Senate Inquiry will get the iniquitous medical arrangements altered - but George has called me the Patron Saint of Lost Causes in the past!

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Hi Yeahbut

 

I can understand your being defensive about your girls. Every parent is.

 

However Westly is right. What you think about your girls -and what he thinks about the girls - are both irrelevant. What the Medical Officer of the Commonwealth thinks the girls will cost Australia is the only thing that matters. The legislation is set up in such a way that the MOC's opinion is the only one that counts.

 

From what you have said in your PM and later in this thread, it seems that yuor Agent is saying that you "should" be entitled to claim the DIAC Health Waiver (available for Partner and Child Visas mainly) because you have a Partner visa in mind?

 

Personally I think this is simplistic advice. If the MOC decides that one or both girls will be entitled to State Benefits at any stage - or to special assistance at school - then the MOC will say that the costs will be "significant costs" because they would exceed the costs of keeping a non-disabled Aussie going. For a normal visa, those costs are about $21,000 for a migrant's first 3 to 5 years in Oz. When the DIAC Health Waiver comes in to play, the allowable costs increase to about $200,000 over the migrants' working lifetime. However long-term State Benefits come to more than $200K during a working lifetime - wherein is often the rub because the costs are not confined to direct medical etc cost alone.

 

What happens in the UK is irrelevant = the UK is not Australia and they have their own systems for assessing disability - it is all in the Tables of Impairment in the Aussie Social Security Act 1991 and other places. The MOC is a group of Government doctors in Sydney, who are mostly GPs.

 

Me a defenise parent ?? :wink:

 

Thank you Gill, for the advice, links and for breaking down to a language I can understand. Yes it is a partner visa that I want to apply for as my Australian partner wants to return home.

 

I feels lots of paperwork and more phonecalls coming on. I have all the paperwork from her speech therapist and teacher of the deaf from the last 2-3 years that backs up my 'opinion' of her. Her special needs statement is under review as we speak as she is 'inline' with her hearing peers so they are wanting to remove it altogether I think. I just need to prove all this to the MOC and that there hearing impairment will not affect them being able to work full time and be a contributing member of society. The blanket view of disabled people makes me so angry.

 

Thanks again I do take on board all comments and suggestions :biggrin:

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Hi Yeahbut

 

I can understand your being defensive about your girls. Every parent is.

 

However Westly is right. What you think about your girls -and what he thinks about the girls - are both irrelevant. What the Medical Officer of the Commonwealth thinks the girls will cost Australia is the only thing that matters. The legislation is set up in such a way that the MOC's opinion is the only one that counts.

 

From what you have said in your PM and later in this thread, it seems that yuor Agent is saying that you "should" be entitled to claim the DIAC Health Waiver (available for Partner and Child Visas mainly) because you have a Partner visa in mind?

 

Personally I think this is simplistic advice. If the MOC decides that one or both girls will be entitled to State Benefits at any stage - or to special assistance at school - then the MOC will say that the costs will be "significant costs" because they would exceed the costs of keeping a non-disabled Aussie going. For a normal visa, those costs are about $21,000 for a migrant's first 3 to 5 years in Oz. When the DIAC Health Waiver comes in to play, the allowable costs increase to about $200,000 over the migrants' working lifetime. However long-term State Benefits come to more than $200K during a working lifetime - wherein is often the rub because the costs are not confined to direct medical etc cost alone.

 

What happens in the UK is irrelevant = the UK is not Australia and they have their own systems for assessing disability - it is all in the Tables of Impairment in the Aussie Social Security Act 1991 and other places. The MOC is a group of Government doctors in Sydney, who are mostly GPs.

 

We get spates of medical enquiries on here. Sometimes several are running - as at the moment. Sometimes there are none.

 

Have you heard of the UN's recent international Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities? Australia signed it and Australia has ratified it but I think that Australia used a Protocol with it. I think that the Aussie Govt said that the Convention would apply fully to people who are already in Australia and who have either PR or Citizenship but that it would not apply to Australia's medical requirements for Permanent Migration to Australia.

 

According to the Human Rights lawyers in Australia, the Govt cannot lawfully take this stance. It flies in the face of the intention of the Convention. There is a Senate Comittee in Oz that deals with treaties. They want this Oz Govt proviso investigated fully. That is the Minister for Immi's baby because he is responsible for Aussie Immi Law.

 

The Minister for Immi has set up another Committee to deal with the whole thing. Aussie Immi legislation does not distingiuish between an illbess such as cancer and a disabiliy such as deafness. The Australian Govt simply treats both as a person who will come to Australia at "a cost" if that person is given a PR visa for Oz. Therefore any consideration of disability in this context has to include illness as well.

 

The Inquiry Secretary very kindly noticed that most of the contributors to Poms in Oz are migrants and many of them have medical/disability concerns. The thread is here:

 

http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/migration-issues/67292-have-your-say-health-requirement.html

 

After a slow start, the Inquiry now seems to be going at full swing:

 

http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/mig/disability/index.htm

 

Over 90 Submissions have now been published:

 

http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/mig/disability/subs.htm

 

I've done one but mine deals with the elderly as far as CRPD people are concerned. Loads of others have dealt with children and young people instead and/or different disabilities and/or Himan Rights law in Australia.

 

Loads of the Great & Good in Oz have waded in as well. Almost everyone is criticial of the MOC's autonomy but lack of transparency and lack of uniformity between the different MOC doctors. The Royal College of Australasian Physicians have waded in as well. They say that the migration decisions should not be made (as they currently are) by solo GPs acting alone and that GPs often have no specific training for the conditions that they come across in medical practice. That is OK when the doctor can see that something is wrong and can send the person to a suitable specialist. Is it enough for a mere GP to be able to announce, "Deafness will cause this person to spend a lifetime on State Benefits at a total cost of about $x AUD," though? Personally I think not.

 

I think the Aussie legislation will have to be changed. However George Lombard is an Aussie lawyer, has worked for the Aussie Government etc and is generally very eminent in his field (Immi Law) so far as most of us in the UK are concerned because we haven't heard of that many people in this field, for a start.

 

George reckons that the Senate Inquiry is likely to be a waste of time. He says that DIAC are running an internal Inquiry of their own. He thinks that regardless of what the public Inquiry concludes, DIAC's public servants will spin it and come up with a theory of their own about how to deal with the whole issue. George may very well be right about that. Public Servants in the UK usually do exactly as Goerge says and what the public servants come up with won't be independent - it will be slanted to whatever the Government of the day wants.

 

I want to believe that the Senate Inquiry will get the iniquitous medical arrangements altered - but George has called me the Patron Saint of Lost Causes in the past!

 

Cheers

 

Gill

 

You are pretty well right.

 

From what has been posted my frank and candid opinion is that they should be prepared for an adverse medical decision. Such a decision is reviewable by a Review Medical Officer of the Commonwealth. If there is a point of law involved (you can explain – failed to exercise jurisdiction if you want to) in an adverse decision it is possible to apply to a federal court, that at best will order the RMOC to make another decision according to law and at the worst will fit the applicant with costs that will make the most avaricious cabal of migration agents look like a charitable institution.

 

To be clear, the medical decision is CONCLUSIVE and the minister (DIAC case officer) MUST accept it.

 

For some visa subclasses the DIAC case officer has the discretion to waive the health criteria for an applicant who does not satisfy them. If the case officer does not exercise the waiver discretion and refuses the visas the decision is reviewable on the merits in the Migration Review Tribunal.

 

As far as the DIAC are concerned visa applicants are a number with a dollar sign in front of it. Australian immigration are quite capable of incarcerating children until they are so psychologically damaged they can never recover - see the recent comments by the Australian of the year. With all that there are good people in a bad system and the prospective applicants might be lucky.

 

What these people should be preparing for is a MRT review application to try to persuade the MRT member to direct the minister to exercise a health waiver, or two. If their case does not go this far the preparation would not have been wasted - medical and school reports, evidence of mother's expertise, and so on.

 

I have advised them about the first step – medical reports and educational assessments. What else they might be able to bring forward I do not know.

 

Do they have an infant Australian citizen child?

 

 

 

What level of support would the children need in the Australian system and how much would the parents be able to provide? Prove it.

 

What percentage of people in Australia with similar medical difficulties apply for income support and are these children likely to need income support? Make the case that it will not be needed.

 

If visas were refused other family members would be aversely affected in the following ways…

 

and so on.

 

They have to understand that they are dealing with one of the most complex areas of migration law and this is no place for DIY or well-meaning amateurs. The parties would be well advised to consult a registered migration agent for an opinion.

 

The information above is just that and is not a considered professional opinion. I wish them the best of luck with whatever they decide to do.


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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Thank you Westly for the advice and putting some further information and areas for me to look into.

 

I am in contact with a registered agent that seems to know what they are doing, but it always helps to know more as I can then ask more relevant questions to get a clearer picture.

 

Tracey

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I just wanted to update this thread for any future people that have the same medical worry that I had with my 2 hearing impaired daughters. One has a serve loss the other has a moderate loss.

 

They have both passed their medicals, it was referred to the MOC and we got the all clear today.

 

We supplied reports from the girls ENT specialists and Audiologist. For my youngest daughter we also supplied speech therapy reports and up school reports.

 

Needless to say I am very happy and relived.

 

Tracey

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Congratulations Tracey xx


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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