Jump to content
Eera

NHS treatment when not resident

Recommended Posts

A lady I work with is a british citizen by birth but has lived in Australia all her life, she wants to go and visit relatives but has a medical condition that requires her to have hospital treatment every two weeks.

 

As I understand it, because she isn't ordinarily resident in the UK she can't get treatment on the NHS, is that right? She's been told it will cost her up to 1200 quid per pop which basically prevents her from going over there.

 

Can anyone confirm that this is the case?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Guest31881

Hi,

have a look at this page about countries who have agreement with UK for treatement.

 

Are you visiting the United Kingdom? : Department of Health - Health care

 

Right at the bottom of the page it refers to countries that have bilateral agreements with UK, Australia is listed. I beleive she would be able to get free treatement.

 

You say she attends hospital every two weeks for treatement. I would suggest she ask's at the hospital she attends if they can arrange for her to have a refferal to a UK hospital for treatement whilst she would be there as a visitor. My brother lives abroad and returns once a year to see his children, His wife needed 3 treatements a week and the hospital she attended arranged with Uk for her to continue treatement whilst in UK.

 

She will need an assurance that there will be no cost, Initially my sister in law was told she would have to pay and the UK Hospital had to clear it with the local health authority. It is better to have it all set up and in place before she travels.

 

As a side note, whilst staying with her relatives she is automatically covered by that families GP, if she needs to see one she just has to register as a visitor to the family home. :notworthy:

 

Every UK Hospital has a PALS service, (patient advice liasion service). she could try emailing the PALS at the hospital that she would attend in the Uk for advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi,

have a look at this page about countries who have agreement with UK for treatement.

 

Are you visiting the United Kingdom? : Department of Health - Health care

 

Right at the bottom of the page it refers to countries that have bilateral agreements with UK, Australia is listed. I beleive she would be able to get free treatement.

 

You say she attends hospital every two weeks for treatement. I would suggest she ask's at the hospital she attends if they can arrange for her to have a refferal to a UK hospital for treatement whilst she would be there as a visitor. My brother lives abroad and returns once a year to see his children, His wife needed 3 treatements a week and the hospital she attended arranged with Uk for her to continue treatement whilst in UK.

 

She will need an assurance that there will be no cost, Initially my sister in law was told she would have to pay and the UK Hospital had to clear it with the local health authority. It is better to have it all set up and in place before she travels.

 

As a side note, whilst staying with her relatives she is automatically covered by that families GP, if she needs to see one she just has to register as a visitor to the family home. :notworthy:

 

Every UK Hospital has a PALS service, (patient advice liasion service). she could try emailing the PALS at the hospital that she would attend in the Uk for advice.

 

 

This information is nearly correct, however as a former NHS worker I have addressed similar situations during the course of my employment. The reciprocol health agreement between Australia and the UK applies to emergency treatment only, if you have a pre-existing condition that requires regular treatment then you should seek advice from travel insurance companies. Although the lady in question is a British citizen she would be classed as an overseas citizen which alters her rights to treatment and benefits. She may be asked to prove her intension to stay in the UK..... This would be difficult if she is planning to go for a holiday.

 

My advice is to get in touch with the local health authority in the area that she will be staying in whilst in the UK before travelling and explain the situation as ultimately it will be them who makes the decision as to whether or not the NHS will foot the bill for her treatment.

 

Hope this helps !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This information is nearly correct, however as a former NHS worker I have addressed similar situations during the course of my employment. The reciprocol health agreement between Australia and the UK applies to emergency treatment only, if you have a pre-existing condition that requires regular treatment then you should seek advice from travel insurance companies. Although the lady in question is a British citizen she would be classed as an overseas citizen which alters her rights to treatment and benefits. She may be asked to prove her intension to stay in the UK..... This would be difficult if she is planning to go for a holiday.

 

My advice is to get in touch with the local health authority in the area that she will be staying in whilst in the UK before travelling and explain the situation as ultimately it will be them who makes the decision as to whether or not the NHS will foot the bill for her treatment.

 

Hope this helps !

 

Not suggesting you first hand NHS experience is wrong, but I am surprised by the "emergency treatment only" as the Australian agreement says "medically necessary" treatment and covers non emergency things that need to be treated before the patient returns home - including things like trips to the GP or whatever - no emergency required.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Emergency/medically necessary. Sorry should have made that clearer, it does include GP stuff....but if you go to the UK knowing you need that treatment then you need to prearrange things because the local health authority may not agree to pay for something that you already know you require (pre-existing conditions) and therefore should have covered privately or by insurance....that's more what I was getting at.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×