Jump to content
Guest guest33730

I know no one will care but...........

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Toots said:

Former Labour MP Mr Sleazy Craig Thomson has been charged over an alleged multi million dollar migration fraud.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-11-17/craig-thomson-charged-over-alleged-migration-fraud/100627382

And to add to his list of sleaziness he has been served with an apprehended domestic violence order to protect his wife.  A magistrate at Gosford Local Court agreed to the police application on behalf of Zoe Thomson, documents show.

Thomson was not present in court when the order was made on Monday.

Magistrate Christopher Longley ordered the former NSW politician be forbidden from assaulting, threatening, stalking, harassing or intimidating his wife or anyone with whom she has a domestic relationship.

 

Sleaze and corruption is all about I'm afraid. Some of the least likely and best turned out are up to their eyeballs in illegal gain. I'm afraid domestic violence is prominent in all circles. Even Boris got himself into a bit of bother over this matter. Top down. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Toots said:

For me it would probably be to stay on at school.  I left school 2 weeks after my 15th birthday.  That's a long time ago and it wasn't unusual in those days unless you were going to university. I went straight to work as an office junior at the local solicitor's office then left home not long after my 16th birthday to do 3 years vet nurse training (equine) in the Lake District.  Never was out of work and lived and worked in other countries after that.

OH and I bought our first house in our mid twenties.  A lot easier to do in those days.  

 

I left school 5 days after my 16th birthday and started my first job as an office junior 3 days later.  Something I had to agree to in order to get the job was to go to part time college and learn to type.  They paid me to do all the RSA typing courses and exams.  I didn’t realise it at the time but that set me up really well in the start of my working life.  After some years being in secretarial roles,  I did a complete career change and 26 years later I am still in that new career today.  I’ve studied and taken various exams over the years and I have no regrets about leaving school when I did (although I sometimes feel a bit thick when people talk about their degrees and achievements) It’s harder these days I think.  Today I wouldn’t be able to get the job I have on the qualifications I had when leaving school.  I’m not sure it should just come down to school/uni qualifications but that has to be a good start and in a younger person it’s all you have to go on I guess.  Emotional intelligence is powerful I think and often overlooked. 

Edited by Tulip1
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 16/11/2021 at 01:01, Bottie said:

fell asleep ( again) watching tv this evening … wide awake now …

Don't you hate that!


......Just trying to be helpful so don't shoot me down if my personal views do not coincide with yours! :animal-dog:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tulip1 said:

I left school 5 days after my 16th birthday and started my first job as an office junior 3 days later.  Something I had to agree to in order to get the job was to go to part time college and learn to type.  They paid me to do all the RSA typing courses and exams.  I didn’t realise it at the time but that set me up really well in the start of my working life.  After some years being in secretarial roles,  I did a complete career change and 26 years later I am still in that new career today.  I’ve studied and taken various exams over the years and I have no regrets about leaving school when I did (although I sometimes feel a bit thick when people talk about their degrees and achievements) It’s harder these days I think.  Today I wouldn’t be able to get the job I have on the qualifications I had when leaving school.  I’m not sure it should just come down to school/uni qualifications but that has to be a good start and in a younger person it’s all you have to go on I guess.  Emotional intelligence is powerful I think and often overlooked. 

Yes that and good old fashioned common sense.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 16/11/2021 at 19:34, Blue Flu said:

In Fremantle next month is the British Beach Party down in Fremantle. We've just bought tickets . Couple of UK bands playing hits from over the years. Being a 'bit' of a Mod, saw the second from final gig of The Mod Squad in Fremantle several weeks back. Two weeks ago a great night of English Ska music festival near to me in Perth and several all great bands (English Expats) Could almost be in England at the moment with so much English cultural activity. 

Were you a mod? I was a a mod. And Mods were in New Zealand too in 1964. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is a really interesting concept. I mean how do you teach it or develop it? It probably develops organically without you realising but as our world becomes more and more virtual with people communicating through their phones and apps, will that stump EQ in the long run...would make for an interesting thesis!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Toots said:

Yes that and good old fashioned common sense.  

I couldn’t agree more.  Sadly it’s a dying skill I think.  Common sense and gut feeling are things I often fall back on. 

Edited by Tulip1
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 09/11/2021 at 22:24, Skani said:

It's not the abbreviation itself which is offensive but the fact that the word was often used in a derogatory context in the UK.  In Australia it's been used in the normal Aussie way of abbreviating any name - without the derogatory connotation.  But I don't know whether the Pakistan team were comfortable with that or just didn't want to raise the issue.  The Australian equivalents are words like coon, wog and dago which have been used  in a  negative and derogatory manner in the past.

It was interesting that the BBC bleeped out « paki » during its reporting of Azeem Rafiq’s testimony before the Senate enquire into racism at Yorkshire CCC.  Sky didn’t !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

It was interesting that the BBC bleeped out « paki » during its reporting of Azeem Rafiq’s testimony before the Senate enquire into racism at Yorkshire CCC.  Sky didn’t !

When you start bleeping out the news the world really has gone mad.


Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

It was interesting that the BBC bleeped out « paki » during its reporting of Azeem Rafiq’s testimony before the Senate enquire into racism at Yorkshire CCC.  Sky didn’t !

Not sure where this fits into the complaints proceedings , I am not condoning the use of the word find it offensive but hypocrisy does  come to mind.

1084679D-D9C2-4F40-A665-603A240B5509.jpeg

Edited by Rallyman
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Rallyman said:

Not sure where this fits into the complaints proceedings 

1084679D-D9C2-4F40-A665-603A240B5509.jpeg

Who are those two racists? It shows how silly the whole thing is when your nationality becomes a slur.

  • Like 1

Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

I couldn’t agree more.  Sadly it’s a dying skill I think.  Common sense and gut feeling are things I often fall back on. 

Sadly sense and common rarely go together. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Parley said:

Who are those two racists? It shows how silly the whole thing is when your nationality becomes a slur.

Context and place I think you will find. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Dusty Plains said:

Were you a mod? I was a a mod. And Mods were in New Zealand too in 1964. 

 

No idea Mods were in NZ. (especially so early)Probably  too young to have been a Mod first time around  (in real time) and passed the need of belonging stage by their second revival. Love the scooters though, some really decked out as the originals. (I expect they cop a bit of stick on the road at times? I've seen them a few times riding as a group great sight , some with Union flags and all) and the average age of the transplanted Perth Mods, looks to be sixty. So probably age isn't a factor. Great music as well. But then like the early Skinhead stuff when it was Caribbean influenced dance style stuff pre racist nonsense as well . 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Parley said:

Who are those two racists? It shows how silly the whole thing is when your nationality becomes a slur.

I think one is Azeem , happy to be corrected though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Blue Flu said:

Context and place I think you will find. 

OK context and place I agree with, but how can Pakistanis find paki offensive.

I think they just use it to use the racial word.

It's like blacks calling each other the n word, yet a white uses it and they are up in arms.

To me if a word is seen as being racist and made you upset, you wouldn't use it at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Lavers said:

OK context and place I agree with, but how can Pakistanis find paki offensive.

I think they just use it to use the racial word.

It's like blacks calling each other the n word, yet a white uses it and they are up in arms.

To me if a word is seen as being racist and made you upset, you wouldn't use it at all.

I suppose they are reclaiming the word in the case of the n word. A bit like Southern Europeans reclaimed wogs in the Aussie context. Would a Aussie Greek accept being called a wog these days? Especially if done so in anger. Probably not. I dare say a bit similar to Paki. Remember the word in England refers to anyone of that region. Not just Pakistani's. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Blue Flu said:

I suppose they are reclaiming the word in the case of the n word. A bit like Southern Europeans reclaimed wogs in the Aussie context. Would a Aussie Greek accept being called a wog these days? Especially if done so in anger. Probably not. I dare say a bit similar to Paki. Remember the word in England refers to anyone of that region. Not just Pakistani's. 

Unless a wog is an abbreviation for someone from Wogistan then no your analogy doesn't apply.

  • Haha 1

Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Parley said:

Unless a wog is an abbreviation for someone from Wogistan then no your analogy doesn't apply.

Well it does apply within the original context that I was replying to if you read it. 

Ok. Wog was suggested as meaning (H) Wonourable  Oriental Gentleman. But somehow think it still doesn't pass censure. I equally suspect the term Paki ........ followed by steel capped boots to the head would not be abbreviated form put to such use with any other country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Lavers said:

OK context and place I agree with, but how can Pakistanis find paki offensive.

I think they just use it to use the racial word.

It's like blacks calling each other the n word, yet a white uses it and they are up in arms.

To me if a word is seen as being racist and made you upset, you wouldn't use it at all.

It’s a bit like you pointing out the bad points with your family members and having a laugh and joke about it, but if someone else/a stranger came up and started telling you negatives/bad points about your family you’d probably get quite upset with them. I’ve called my brothers all sorts of names, but if anyone else spoke to them that way I’d get quite angry about it.


:evilface_frowning_s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guys, it's all pretty straightforward and doesn't require this level of conjecture. These words are inappropriate and you all understand them to be inappropriate because none of you would risk directing those words at someone's face in an employment context on the basis of their race. 

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Parley said:

Unless a wog is an abbreviation for someone from Wogistan then no your analogy doesn't apply.

This conversation is such absolute nonsense and really quite distasteful.  You and everyone in this thread know full well that the 'Paki' abbreviation was taken up by racists and transformed into a pejorative that was used as a weapon for decades.   Your faux confusion is as disingenuous as it is transparent and disrespectful to the hundreds of thousands of people who were subject to racial abuse for the past 40 years with this word deployed as a slur being right at the forefront.

 

It's not remotely similar to calling someone an Aussie, a Kiwi or a Brit because those things have never been accompanied by violent anti-immigration gangs going around the streets "Aussie-bashing", "kiwi-bashing" or "Brit-bashing" anyone who physically resembled the people from those places.   Aussie, Kiwi & Brit have never been used to attack, belittle and diminish those people as being somehow 'lesser', nor used to threaten and intimidate.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Find out about one of the letters sent to Ebony Rainford-Brent.  Britain has the worst institutionalised racism in the planet and it’s been like that for centuries. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, FirstWorldProblems said:

This conversation is such absolute nonsense and really quite distasteful.  You and everyone in this thread know full well that the 'Paki' abbreviation was taken up by racists and transformed into a pejorative that was used as a weapon for decades.   Your faux confusion is as disingenuous as it is transparent and disrespectful to the hundreds of thousands of people who were subject to racial abuse for the past 40 years with this word deployed as a slur being right at the forefront.

 

It's not remotely similar to calling someone an Aussie, a Kiwi or a Brit because those things have never been accompanied by violent anti-immigration gangs going around the streets "Aussie-bashing", "kiwi-bashing" or "Brit-bashing" anyone who physically resembled the people from those places.   Aussie, Kiwi & Brit have never been used to attack, belittle and diminish those people as being somehow 'lesser', nor used to threaten and intimidate.

White bashing goes on though in Pakistani communities, one of my friends actually got beaten to death for walking into a non white zone in England and the police did nothing as to not cause racial tension.

  • Sad 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, MacGyver said:

It’s a bit like you pointing out the bad points with your family members and having a laugh and joke about it, but if someone else/a stranger came up and started telling you negatives/bad points about your family you’d probably get quite upset with them. I’ve called my brothers all sorts of names, but if anyone else spoke to them that way I’d get quite angry about it.

That is a very valid point 👍

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×