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tracy123

Australia the foreign land

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Just a thought.

When looking at Australia as a place to live do you think of it as an extension of Britain or a foreign country? When going on a recci you may get a false perception of what Australia is all about, you go to the schools - great they are broadly based on an English education system, you talk to people in the streets - great they speak English, you go looking at jobs (or read the papers to see loads of jobs in your field) great another box ticked, you go looking in the shops WOW they sell weetabix, marmite etc, etc, etc EVERYTHING seems so much like the UK I honestly think this could work (it’s the UK with warmer weather!!!!) WRONG

You put in all this hard work, said your emotional good byes sold your house and are now on your way to the promised lands!!!!!!!! CONGRATULATIONS……….

You hop off the plane full of mixed emotions hopes and dreams of your new life.

Your first stop your rental accommodation….. Right what first?

Schools what year do your children go into where are they in the schooling (ahead, Behind etc?) what’s the best school to put my children etc…… You start looking at jobs have you got your tax file number? Have you got the right qualifications, experience required???? Food shopping what brands do I buy???? Why does this box of weetabix taste different is it not English!!!!! Cars where do I get the best deal, WHY OH WHY DID I NOT BRING ALL OF MY FURNITURE????!!!! EVERYTHING is so expensive to buy…… I can’t find the right rental property, why do I keep getting refused????? Banking…… Medicare…. Doctors……. MY HEAD IS JUST SPINNING, I WANT TO GO HOME. :arghh:This is just a small part of what lays waiting for you to get to grips with once landing in Australia.

It will take time to sort out all of these things out, to find the best restaurants, cheaper places to buy things etc (remember it’s taken your whole life to get where you are in England) For months even years you may convert things back to pounds remember tastes smells etc this is all normal, Britain has been your home your whole life, things will be strange to you.

I understand some will agree and others will disagree with me and that’s fine

I just think if you treat Australia as a “foreign” destination full of new challenges cultures tastes etc and give yourself time to familiarize and adjust to your new surroundings things may just work out. You’re starting your life from scratch, make the most of a fresh start jump in with both feet expect the bad days and remember why you have spent all that time and money to get to Australia

Most of all good luck no matter what happens

All the best

Geoffrey


Kind Regards

 

Geoffrey (32, an aussie!!), Tracy (35), Jake (7), Jessica (2) & Joseph (1) :jiggy:

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Although I didn't ponder the question prior to visiting Aus Geoff I would have probably thought it had a lot of similarities to England. After our visit in 2005 we realised it was a country in it's own right, it felt very different and we came home wanting to live here. Some of the things that I encounter here are more like the US than England.

 

We see Australia as Australia, we came out with the expectation of living in a foreign country but with the benefit of being able to speak the language already, we've adapted, we've ridden the ups and downs that we would have got wherever we would have lived. I was going to say that I love it was much as when we arrived, but it's probably more so now, I have a feeling of belonging and am very content with my little lot in life.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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You are very right Geoffrey, that is very good post. I am a local, born here with Brit parents, lived in UK and Aus at different times and now home here for the long haul, visiting the UK when I can. I find that even going back to the UK for a visit and then coming home it takes me a while to settle back down. I realised that feeling again only last Thursday when a friend of mine invited me out and said to me that she would meet me at that English Tavern not far from where I live.

Didn't know what she was talking about until I finally found it (in the Basin in outer eastern Melbourne) and when I went in it really was an English tavern. Brit beers/Brit food, open fire ! My friend made the comment that it must bring back some memories of living in the UK, and she was right and I realised what a strange feeling that can be, being in a UK style pub but not actually being there. So I can well understand how hard it would be to pack up and go and live in a strange country permanently. A hard one, for sure.


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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Guest JoanneHattersley
I just think if you treat Australia as a “foreign” destination full of new challenges cultures tastes etc and give yourself time to familiarize and adjust to your new surroundings things may just work out.

 

Couldnt have put it better myself! Great post Geoff. Thats exactly what we did. No pre conceived ideas, no reccys, just went for it!

 

Treated Australia as a new country. Lucky enough they talk english and drive on the left! lol!

 

Been here not far off 5 years now. There are still things we are finding out but I still have the same excitement as I had on day1!

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Very good post Tracy, that's the way it is. Australia is my third country so I knew not to keep comparing. Been here 40 years now, you do eventually find all the things that you need at the right prices.


Nigel's Travel Blog

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I live in Australia for family reasons. My family is in UK.

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oz will be ok when its finished:jimlad:


I have the body of an eighteen year old. I keep it in the fridge.

Spike Milligan

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Good post, i think it has helped us thinking it as a foreign country because it is. We just happen to speak most of the language and they drive on the correct side of the road.

Good for all those that haven't made it here yet to read it as i think it will help.

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Guest littlesarah

Personally, I think it's pretty insulting to Australia and its inhabitants to view it as 'another Britain'! Why would it be anything like the UK? It's on the other side of the world, and includes people whose forebears migrated from all over the world.

 

Of course it is a separate nation with its own identity and culture - surely that's the whole point of moving here?

 

Sarah

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Guest JoanneHattersley
Personally, I think it's pretty insulting to Australia and its inhabitants to view it as 'another Britain'! Why would it be anything like the UK? It's on the other side of the world, and includes people whose forebears migrated from all over the world.

 

Of course it is a separate nation with its own identity and culture - surely that's the whole point of moving here?

 

Sarah

 

I think what Geoff meant by his post was not an insult. He merely meant that this country is viewed by some as `like uk` purely cos Australians soeak english and drive on the left!

 

Its very much a different place from cultures to food, from sport to weather! Well everything!!!

 

Of course it is a separate nation with its own identity and culture - surely that's the whole point of moving here?

 

 

some people move here to escape things, different identity and culture does not come into it

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Guest littlesarah

Joanne

 

I wasn't trying to argue with anyone on this thread - I have met a number of British people who migrated & hated it here, because their expectations were unrealistic. People forget that Australia's ties to the UK are now largely historic rather than geographic or trade-based.

 

Whatever the reasons for leaving the UK, and wherever one 'escapes' to (if that's the reason for leaving) it is not possible to leave one country & live in another one identical in all but location. That is an unrealistic ideal (I believe).

 

Please note that I am not chastising anyone for their actions or feelings. Just stating my point of view. If this is unhelpful or offensive I apologise.

 

Sarah

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Guest JoanneHattersley

expectations were unrealistic.

 

 

Well said!!

 

No need to apologise!

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Guest guest30038

Good post Geoffrey.

 

Just one thing to add..............just got back from Sydney and it was a world apart from Brizzy. Went in to an "International" food court (as it was labelled)...............hundreds of food stalls and not one of them European :arghh: All Asian. Really fancied something different and thought I might get it in the "big city" but no.

 

Caught the ferry from Manly and the commuters really reminded me of London bustle.........although nobody pushed and shoved :biglaugh:

 

When we think of Oz, we need to think of just how different it can be in different locations and not tar one city with the same brush as another.

 

kev

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Guest guest17301

I see Australia as a country in it's own right. A foreign land but to me feels strangely familiar and I do not feel like I'm halfway around the world. Its Australia but it's also got a very...I can't say British..but definitely European feel to it. I haven't experienced culture shock though was expecting to...maybe it will come later..but I feel very well adapted..8 months in (today!)

I love Austrlia (as you may already know!) I feel very lucky to be here and thankful to the Australians that have welcomed me and my family.

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I'd moved around quite a lot before I arrived in Australia. First big move was from NW England (Lancashire), to London, now that's an expensive foreign country to anyone from up north, next I moved to Winchester, different again, after a few years I went back through a time warp to New Zealand where they still had real weekends but ruined it by allowing the shops to open, good lifestyle but I was running like mad to stand still so I hopped on a plane to Oz, best move I've ever made, love it now and England is the foreign country, I could never go back and to be honest am beginning to lose interest in visiting.


Nigel's Travel Blog

General Blog

 

I live in Australia for family reasons. My family is in UK.

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Guest NewinVic

Good post Geoff. It's like you've read my mind. Visited Melbourne April last year for a two week holiday (and look around). Everything seemed positive!

 

Arrived here six months ago on my wifes 457. Since then I've come to accept that life in Oz is at the very least "challenging".

 

The IMMI should include your post in their website.

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I agree with what has been said and will take it a bit further. I read a lot of posts from people wanting to return to the UK as they miss lots of friends etc and find it hard to get the same feeling with friends here in Australia. Making friends is takes time and effort, like little plants lots of watering done on both sides. Throughout our life we have many acquaintances, friends for a short while and then we have a core of good friends who we have known for years and years and time has built the friendship to be the way it is.

 

As migrants bringing children to the country you will find that your children will have those long term friendships that you yearn for back in UK. Unfortunately you may not have many unless you stay in the same job, same street, in the same area and build a life around the community.

 

I have long term friends here and yesterday I was at a funeral in Foster in Gippsland and felt really at home amongst my friend's family and extended family and all the people they knew in the area because her father was a well known farmer and breeder of cattle. Fantastic do, loved every minute of it and the humour was all there just like humour in the UK.

 

This takes time and just be patient and do not throw in the towell, you will meet people through your children too. It does happen and its worth waiting to meet those people who you really gell with.

 

Do not be disappointed, you are doing it for your children and they will have the life when they grow and they will belong.


Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

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Guest ShaznDaz

I can see that australians dont like it but british people colonised it and it will take a long time for that to die out. It sometimes seems that aussies would like to be under the charge of americans but it isnt. Australia is very differrnt to the UK but probably not as much as Oz people would like.

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I like to think that we are going with the idea that it is a foreign country and things will be diffrent, part of the reason we want to go! We often say the last thing we want is to live our lives exactly the same as over here, but with the disavantage of not having family and friends around - that would be silly!!! We have always believed as well that the only way we will suceed is if we accept the Aussie lifestyle and not expect Assie to accept ours!!

 

However I am sure that won't stop us from getting homesick!


15.05.09....Formal Job Offer. 19.05.09....Application to NBV sent. 02.07.09....Registered with NBV! 20.07.09....Medicals complete. 24.07.09....457 Visa App sent. 07.10.09....457 VISA GRANTED!!!!!:jiggy:

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Good post.

I was initially surprised at how much some places in WA reminded me of the USA rather than the UK. Also, I never said 'USA' or 'UK' till I came here.

Whilst I was here on holiday, it naively seemed like the UK in the sun. When I started working, and actually mixing with Australians, I realised how different it, and they are.

I like them, don't get me wrong, but Australia is no UK in the sun.

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Guest littlesarah
It sometimes seems that aussies would like to be under the charge of americans but it isnt. Australia is very differrnt to the UK but probably not as much as Oz people would like.

 

The Aussies I know, and with whom I've discussed this matter, do not want to be 'under the charge of' any country - be that the UK or USA. And who can blame them? As an island nation that mostly runs its own affairs, why should it be a colony of another country?!

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We geographically part of Oceania but politically and economically we seem to be moving more towards Asia (the place that you fly over on your way to Europe). Haven't seen any trading figures lately but I think at least our top two trading partners are in Asia.


Nigel's Travel Blog

General Blog

 

I live in Australia for family reasons. My family is in UK.

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Guest Obedoh
The Aussies I know, and with whom I've discussed this matter, do not want to be 'under the charge of' any country - be that the UK or USA. And who can blame them? As an island nation that mostly runs its own affairs, why should it be a colony of another country?!

 

 

Unfortunately, that's the way it appears. It seems that Oz started off in life as UK but then decided to change it's identity halfway. Now there is a mixture of both UK and USA, what Oz needs is neither, just it's own identity. IMO

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