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Help! Where is the 'culture' and the 'buzz' in the UK? I can't find it!

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Guest boomerangpommie

Just out of interest, really. I've read countless times on here how there is no 'culture' in Australia or people are missing the 'buzz' of the UK while they are living there. What do people actually mean by these words and in what way are they missing in Australia? I'm working on the principle that you guys don't mean hanging out at museums (which I, BTW love but with kids...) and watching the ballet all the time! lol

 

As it's the half-term hols and we've all been off this week (OH included), we've obviously been taking full advantage of doing 'qulaity' (and cheap :err:) activities together as a family, as you do. On Bank Holiday Monday we went to the Lord Mayor's Show here in Birmingham, which was billled as 'A fun day out for the whole family' (you just know it's gonna be downhill from there!). Well, in a word, all I can say is DIRE - some tired, old bouncy castles; the police showing off their dogs and car sirens; the fire brigade warning the public to install smoke alarms and the piece de resistance, some mediocre bands and 'multi-cultural' music on a tiny stage. There was a very poor turn-out and just no atmosphere!!

 

We went to Windsor later in the week - to go to Legoland but spent a day pottering around the town as well. Lovely castle (never went inside, family ticket = 41 pounds) and Eton's cute, never knew the College would look like that, thought it was set in grounds in the countryside. Anyway, Windsor High St, just like all the others in England, same shops, same grimness, same chavs.

 

And then there's Legoland, well 37 pounds per adult to get in and 27 pounds per child (we had kids go free vouchers, otherwise it would have been a no-no). The shortest queue we were in was 1 hour 10 minutes long. They do a service called q-bot, which you can get at an additional 10 pounds per person - it's a fancy gadget that queues in a virtual queue for you and then alerts you when it's time to get on your ride so that you don't have to stand for an hour plus carrying a two tonne, crying four year old who has had enough of it all by midday and just wants to go home... But I think at the price paid for admission, I expect some sort of value for money, without having to pay even more on top - now that's very British and we just take it. Anyway, in 9 hours, we went on 6 rides!!! (Not one goes upsidedown).

 

I spent my teenage years in beautiful, historic Lincoln (same High St as Windsor and all the other cities in the UK), where I was born and it is close to my heart, so I haven't always lived in an ugly, industrial city and apart from old buildings and history, I still see no 'culture', 'tradtion' or 'buzz'. On a day-to-day basis, weekends and holidays, what is there to DO here that is better than what's available in Oz? I've got loads more to say but now run the risk of being boring, so let's have your ideas.... :confused:

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Guest June Pixie

I think I replied on the ‘no one does summer like us Brits’ thread to this one. But you are not that wrong – I don’t care what anyone says it’s expensive and not a little boring to entertain kids in this country – Granted kids get bored very easily and I take that on board before dragging them up to Dunstanburgh Castle for the millionth time – It always drizzles when I’m there too for some reason. I’ve been a member of National Trust for a few years now as individual entry each time was too much so got an annual family ticket for £75 – This is good value believe me. We visit Wallington Hall loads and all the Northumberland sites quite often. Actually the kids (surprise surprise) are sick to the back teeth of the same places (so ungrateful). Apart from NT I would avoid most other fairs and stuff – I can only eat so much home made nougat and jam. It’s all the same type of stalls with pretentious goods that no one really wants but they buy it anyway to try to support the local community. Kids have to make do, as you say, with a tired looking bouncy castle, which has been to the four corners of the land.

There are no everyday free and relaxing things close by to do – we do try as a family to cycle but there is no nice parks nearby. Actually I’m gonna pack a picnic this weekend drag the kids down to the river and sit in the middle of the grass (there’s no seating) and make some fun.

I think I must sound ungrateful but when you have kids to think of it’s a completely different kettle of fish to what I could do just as a couple – hiking at Keilder, cycling to Carlisle and back. Unless your kid is super enthusiastic they just want a nice local park and swimming pool. Well mine do anyway.

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LOL

 

We just had a booster seat for my daughter delivered, and my son said " Yay, a box!!!!"

But having said that we can't spend 7 solid days making robots out of empty boxes!!!!

OH been away working, so this w/end I suggested we go somwhere - Legoland/Wicksteed Park?

He suggested Skegness!!! It's our closest seaside. So, socks in sandals and string vests we're off for a day trip tomorrow.

Anyway back on topic - culture? Supermarkets and Sunday shopping??

Buzz? Busy shops??

Frankly, my kids don't want to walk around lovely villages shopping for local jam or visit stately homes.

The Natural History Museum in Oxford has free entry and there's free parking on Sundays, so that's a fave. We look for places like that.

 

Sue x


IELTS, ACS RPL, Feb 26th 09 175 online lodged

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My kids like nothing more than going down to our local river, bucket and nets in hand and go fishing, also down to weymouth rock pool where they can go crabbing! Or even a trip into the new forest!

Other than that they love marwel zoo! Very out doorsy my lot! :wacko:


Oz is Beautiful, but the uk is home :wubclub:

Returned to Bournemouth 20th August 2010

 

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Yeah, Dawny, we're in the midlands, so we've got the canals!!!

Not sure they should be 'fishing' much out of there, and don't want them falling in that!!

So day trip to Skeggy! yay!!

 

Sue x


IELTS, ACS RPL, Feb 26th 09 175 online lodged

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Guest LondonGal

For me “culture” is museums, history, galleries, the Arts, stimulating intellectual media, markets (sorry, but they are crap in Perth), discovering new things, little side lanes, greasy café’s, upmarket restaurants, olde worlde high streets, (although I agree with you about Windsor, it’s probably not the best one I have been to), UK eccentricities, people who are not afraid to be different and loads of other things that I can't quite find the right words for at the mo.

 

The buzz is a bit harder to define, for me I suppose it’s a feeling of belonging somewhere and being “part of something” and being with people who get me. Here in Perth I often feel I am on the outside looking in. I like the vibrancy and diversity of cities, which I don’t think Perth has. Brisbane didn’t do it for me, Melbourne has it a bit, can’t comment on Sydney as I haven’t been there. I also think that rest of the UK is very diverse in a way that Oz is not. I love that you can drive 30 mins out of London and feel like you are in the middle of nowhere. Others would probably disagree with me.

 

As for things to do I think a lot depends on what stage you are at in your life and what you want from life. I can only give my experience of Perth but our kids are getting older and we feel things are limited here now. There are a limited number of attractions here and once you’ve done them a few times they do get a bit tired. If the beach is your thing though, you are in the right place ;-).

 

I grew up in London and worked in the city until I emigrated so I love the place and I’m used to being in a busy place. Other’s hate it because it is so busy ;-). I know it has its awful parts but so does every city.

 

We have been in the position of thinking there was something better elsewhere so I don’t blame anyone for thinking the same, you never know you may be right.

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For me “culture” is museums, history, galleries, the Arts, stimulating intellectual media, markets (sorry, but they are crap in Perth), discovering new things, little side lanes, greasy café’s, upmarket restaurants, olde worlde high streets, (although I agree with you about Windsor, it’s probably not the best one I have been to), UK eccentricities, people who are not afraid to be different and loads of other things that I can't quite find the right words for at the mo.

 

The buzz is a bit harder to define, for me I suppose it’s a feeling of belonging somewhere and being “part of something” and being with people who get me. Here in Perth I often feel I am on the outside looking in. I like the vibrancy and diversity of cities, which I don’t think Perth has. Brisbane didn’t do it for me, Melbourne has it a bit, can’t comment on Sydney as I haven’t been there. I also think that rest of the UK is very diverse in a way that Oz is not. I love that you can drive 30 mins out of London and feel like you are in the middle of nowhere. Others would probably disagree with me.

 

As for things to do I think a lot depends on what stage you are at in your life and what you want from life. I can only give my experience of Perth but our kids are getting older and we feel things are limited here now. There are a limited number of attractions here and once you’ve done them a few times they do get a bit tired. If the beach is your thing though, you are in the right place ;-).

 

I grew up in London and worked in the city until I emigrated so I love the place and I’m used to being in a busy place. Other’s hate it because it is so busy ;-). I know it has its awful parts but so does every city.

 

We have been in the position of thinking there was something better elsewhere so I don’t blame anyone for thinking the same, you never know you may be right.

 

Why did you leave? Did you marry an Aussie or did you just get wanderlust?

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Guest LondonGal
Why did you leave? Did you marry an Aussie or did you just get wanderlust?

 

Good question, and one I’ve asked myself often.

All I can say is, I met my OH in the UK (he is English) when he had just come back from backpacking around Oz and he was still buzzing about it and I had a sense of adventure too. So we pretty much decided to go for it, and here we are. We came to Perth because there was extended family here, which maybe was not the best thing to do in hindsight. We should have researched a bit better, although in our defence there was not as much info on the net back in 98-99. I did insist on a reccie in ‘98 but a 3 week holiday really does not prepare you for living somewhere. I don’t hate the place but I would prefer to be in the UK. Circumstances have kept us here longer than I would have liked, ie: kids, not wanting to uproot them again, other family emigrating etc. (Who incidentally feel the same as us). We are taking a trip back early next year to see how we feel and will take it from there.

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Good question, and one I’ve asked myself often.

All I can say is, I met my OH in the UK (he is English) when he had just come back from backpacking around Oz and he was still buzzing about it and I had a sense of adventure too. So we pretty much decided to go for it, and here we are. We came to Perth because there was extended family here, which maybe was not the best thing to do in hindsight. We should have researched a bit better, although in our defence there was not as much info on the net back in 98-99. I did insist on a reccie in ‘98 but a 3 week holiday really does not prepare you for living somewhere. I don’t hate the place but I would prefer to be in the UK. Circumstances have kept us here longer than I would have liked, ie: kids, not wanting to uproot them again, other family emigrating etc. (Who incidentally feel the same as us). We are taking a trip back early next year to see how we feel and will take it from there.

 

Given what you love, Perth does seem a strange choice :) I love most of the things you mentioned too, just not enough to give up what I love about here (and I guess I know where to find some equivalent things here having grown up here). Shame we can't have both - a magic mirror to walk through into cities like New York and London and then walk back through again when you've had your fill. Good luck with your decisions...

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Guest LondonGal
Given what you love, Perth does seem a strange choice :) I love most of the things you mentioned too, just not enough to give up what I love about here (and I guess I know where to find some equivalent things here having grown up here). Shame we can't have both - a magic mirror to walk through into cities like New York and London and then walk back through again when you've had your fill. Good luck with your decisions...

 

Cheers!

I think if I could have London and the Home Counties for 3 weeks a month and Perth for the other week (and the occasional trip to NY to boot, LOL) I would be happy as Larry. In my dreams eh!!

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Guest boomerangpommie

I agree alot iwith LondonGal, 'culture' is to do with museums, galleries, good food and restaurants, bars, intellectual media and markets etc. When I look back to my time living in Sydney, I think those things are there, I was just caught up in my own rubbish to grasp them and enjoy it. I've been to some really lovely markets there, selling artsy stuff and clothes and jewellery that I love, the suburb that we lived in and my SIL's held a spring festival with local 'hobby' groups and kids singing, dancing (eg hulah girls and Pacific-style stuff), different foods, crafts,etc. The Sydney Morning Herald is intellectual enough and the weekend supplements equal those in the UK, although my main focus was always just the jobs section, so I wasn't interested in what they had to offer at that time. I do agree that there isn't really anything like the BBC there, news and Radio 4 etc or 'Have I got news for you?' or 'Never Mind the Buzzcocks' but I think in the grand scheme of things, I can get used to life without them or catch up on the internet.

 

I would swap a night out in Birmingham for one in Newtown any day of the week, some good bars, great food and diverse - I know London has the same buzz but that's like a whole weekend kind of thing, not just a night out to catch a bite to eat... Great, quirky shopping in the daytime too.

 

I mentioned in another thread that we went ot the Domain for the Christmas Carols, that's a tradition in Sydney, as are the ferry races on Australia day, there was a great buzz all around the harbour and CBD that day. In the evening, back in Cronulla, where I was living, there was live music on the beach - swing - playing all of everyone's ratpack faves with everyone out, tartan rugs and eskis, till the wee hours, kids running about and playing, the year before, it was opera on the beach. Anzac Day offers tradition and everyone out and about, relaxing and enjoying themselves and remembering a part of their country's history, even if for some it only extends to taking part in a game of two-up or watching someone else doing it. We just don't really get that here, buying a poppy and then seeing the highlights of the queen laying a wreath on the news is very pedestrian.

 

I'm in danger of seeming like I'm wearing rose-coloured specs but when I think back, there seems to be more culture and related activities than here, where everyone gets involved in some way or another, even if they're not particularly doing it to celebrate the tradtion but just for a great time out. And alot of the activities in Australia, don't close the door on children, which seems to be the case here, I've mentioned this on another thread but take New Year's Eve, I only speak for what I know but in Sydney, the whole family can enjoy a picnic on the harbour (I know it's touristy) and my SIL & family went to somewhere called Sanctuary Point for NY and they had a little fireworks display on - very family orientated. We have the whole fireworks caboodle here now off course, but standing packed together like sardines for hours (in a tense and rowdy atmosphere that feels like it will kick-off any minute), freezing,trying to keep kids entertained is just not the same as sitting in the warmth, on a rug, eating nibbles, drinking wine, watching the kids run around, maybe even with some neighbouring kids they've struck up a friendship with - or if you're organised letting them do some of the low-level activities you've brought for them and then finally watching seriously amazing fireworks that just seem to fill the whole sky and reflect off all the shiny, tall buildings.... :yes:

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Guest Andy
Just out of interest, really. I've read countless times on here how there is no 'culture' in Australia or people are missing the 'buzz' of the UK while they are living there. What do people actually mean by these words and in what way are they missing in Australia? I'm working on the principle that you guys don't mean hanging out at museums (which I, BTW love but with kids...) and watching the ballet all the time! lol

 

As it's the half-term hols and we've all been off this week (OH included), we've obviously been taking full advantage of doing 'qulaity' (and cheap :err:) activities together as a family, as you do. On Bank Holiday Monday we went to the Lord Mayor's Show here in Birmingham, which was billled as 'A fun day out for the whole family' (you just know it's gonna be downhill from there!). Well, in a word, all I can say is DIRE - some tired, old bouncy castles; the police showing off their dogs and car sirens; the fire brigade warning the public to install smoke alarms and the piece de resistance, some mediocre bands and 'multi-cultural' music on a tiny stage. There was a very poor turn-out and just no atmosphere!!

 

We went to Windsor later in the week - to go to Legoland but spent a day pottering around the town as well. Lovely castle (never went inside, family ticket = 41 pounds) and Eton's cute, never knew the College would look like that, thought it was set in grounds in the countryside. Anyway, Windsor High St, just like all the others in England, same shops, same grimness, same chavs.

 

And then there's Legoland, well 37 pounds per adult to get in and 27 pounds per child (we had kids go free vouchers, otherwise it would have been a no-no). The shortest queue we were in was 1 hour 10 minutes long. They do a service called q-bot, which you can get at an additional 10 pounds per person - it's a fancy gadget that queues in a virtual queue for you and then alerts you when it's time to get on your ride so that you don't have to stand for an hour plus carrying a two tonne, crying four year old who has had enough of it all by midday and just wants to go home... But I think at the price paid for admission, I expect some sort of value for money, without having to pay even more on top - now that's very British and we just take it. Anyway, in 9 hours, we went on 6 rides!!! (Not one goes upsidedown).

 

I spent my teenage years in beautiful, historic Lincoln (same High St as Windsor and all the other cities in the UK), where I was born and it is close to my heart, so I haven't always lived in an ugly, industrial city and apart from old buildings and history, I still see no 'culture', 'tradtion' or 'buzz'. On a day-to-day basis, weekends and holidays, what is there to DO here that is better than what's available in Oz? I've got loads more to say but now run the risk of being boring, so let's have your ideas....

QUOTE]

Hi boomerang,

Next time you are in London check out the Imperial War Museum, its a fabulous place and will take the whole day to see everything, me and my kids really enjoyed it and found it very informative. And the best thing about it is its FREE:shocked:

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Re the lack of "stimulating intellectual media" I'm a bit of a world affairs junky and watched it extensively in both the UK and here. I think some of the shows on the ABC are first rate for those of you into that sort of thing:

 

- 7:30 report

- Australia Story

- 4 corners

- Foreign Correspondent

- Q&A

- Compass

 

In fact, I would not swap this lot for any other channel I have watched here or o/s. The standard of reporters and reports is first rate. Granted the UK has great stuff too, just don't think we have the dirth in this area that some people suggest.

 

Even though tragically right wing "The Australian" newspaper has some good features.

 

Also SBS is a fantastic channel with top notch shows and world news. I can even sit and watch the news from non-english speaking countries around the world even though I don't understand it all :) And the fanstastic "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer" from the US. Not to mention all the great European movies they show and football (the proper one). SBS is a fantastic asset and credit to Australian television and I haven't seen it done as well elsewhere.

 

Having said all that I'd swap all our commercial channels (7, 9, 10) just for all the UK shows that have Ant and Dec or Cat Deeley.

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I'm enjoying learning about the Australian Culture and history, I forget that Aus is a relatively new country. In the UK we would love going to historic towns, castles etc., but in reality we did that once a year when we went on holiday.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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You are right Londongirl, of all the cities in Aus, Melbourne is probably the closest to what London can offer, even Billy Connolly said "It's a wee bit British", with a bit of an emphasis on the 'wee' as it is probably best not to compare it to a British city, but it does get compared, and as an Aussie who has lived in London and visited several UK cities, I can see the comparison is sometimes fair. (It has a great cafe and live music culture, and also thriving Arts/Theatre culture, not to mention sports mad). However the 'urban sprawl of Melbourne can take people by surprise, evoking some comparisons with American suburbia as well.


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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Guest nikkichap

Half Term: Having fun with the kids during half term doesn't have to be expensive. I've been back 3 weeks now and am watching every penny. It's not hard to find things to do at very little cost.

 

What I like about being back in the UK is going to our local park and taking a football and a picnic, then having a nice walk through the forest and round the lakes and then off to the nature center and finishing up at the playpark for the kids and all it cost me was the picnic food and an ice-cream for the kids. A very inexpensive day out and fun for us all. The kids got tired out and slept for England!

 

Also been to the adventure playground which costs £1 per child and adults are free. Kids go off and play and I can sit and relax and read my book in the lovely sunshine. Gives the kids some freedom and I can relax knowing they are playing safely.

 

Today we went to Brighton which was a bit more expensive. Had a kids go free voucher to the Sealife Center and then we had a walk along the beech and went on the pier where we brought hotdogs, douhnuts and candyfloss. Had a brilliant time and then had a stroll around the lanes. Didn't buy anything but the buzz of seeing loads of people just sitting outside cafe's enjoying the sun gave me a feel good feeling.

 

For me the buzz is all about having plenty of things to do and not being limited to the beach. I found Oz boring and not much choice of things to do (depending on where you live) and back in the UK you can just jump on a train and in an hour be somewhere exciting. In OZ if we travelled for an hour we would still be on the same old road with the same old scenery and the kids asking "are we there yet"? and then being dissapointed once we get there!

 

I am glad to be back and will never moan about not having anything to do, which I did a lot of in Australia!

 

Nikki

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Guest boomerangpommie

 

What I like about being back in the UK is going to our local park and taking a football and a picnic, then having a nice walk through the forest and round the lakes and then off to the nature center and finishing up at the playpark for the kids and all it cost me was the picnic food and an ice-cream for the kids. A very inexpensive day out and fun for us all. The kids got tired out and slept for England!

 

Also been to the adventure playground which costs £1 per child and adults are free. Kids go off and play and I can sit and relax and read my book in the lovely sunshine. Gives the kids some freedom and I can relax knowing they are playing safely.

 

we had a walk along the beech and went on the pier where we brought hotdogs, douhnuts and candyfloss. Had a brilliant time and then had a stroll around the lanes. Didn't buy anything but the buzz of seeing loads of people just sitting outside cafe's enjoying the sun gave me a feel good feeling.

 

Nikki

 

These are great activities - all of which I remember doing in my local parks in Oz, except that there, you can guarantee that on a day when everyone's off work/school, you can do this and the weather will be good. Here, those days are few and far between and when they do happen, the world and his kids are all trying to cram themselves into the same spaces in a frantic effort to take advantage of it. In Oz, there's still tomorrow and the next day and next week.... We've had a few great days this week but, to be realistic, the weather here often ruins many a plans for a great day out.

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Guest Andy
Half Term: Having fun with the kids during half term doesn't have to be expensive. I've been back 3 weeks now and am watching every penny. It's not hard to find things to do at very little cost.

 

What I like about being back in the UK is going to our local park and taking a football and a picnic, then having a nice walk through the forest and round the lakes and then off to the nature center and finishing up at the playpark for the kids and all it cost me was the picnic food and an ice-cream for the kids. A very inexpensive day out and fun for us all. The kids got tired out and slept for England!

 

Also been to the adventure playground which costs £1 per child and adults are free. Kids go off and play and I can sit and relax and read my book in the lovely sunshine. Gives the kids some freedom and I can relax knowing they are playing safely.

 

Today we went to Brighton which was a bit more expensive. Had a kids go free voucher to the Sealife Center and then we had a walk along the beech and went on the pier where we brought hotdogs, douhnuts and candyfloss. Had a brilliant time and then had a stroll around the lanes. Didn't buy anything but the buzz of seeing loads of people just sitting outside cafe's enjoying the sun gave me a feel good feeling.

 

For me the buzz is all about having plenty of things to do and not being limited to the beach. I found Oz boring and not much choice of things to do (depending on where you live) and back in the UK you can just jump on a train and in an hour be somewhere exciting. In OZ if we travelled for an hour we would still be on the same old road with the same old scenery and the kids asking "are we there yet"? and then being dissapointed once we get there!

 

I am glad to be back and will never moan about not having anything to do, which I did a lot of in Australia!

 

Nikki

Hi Nikki,

Glad you had a good day, we go to Brighton a lot as I have family there and think its a great day out, the pier is fab with loads for the kids to do, also the fish and chip cafe on the pier is brill! I bet it was packed today:cool:

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Guest nikkichap

Everything depends on where in OZ you live. I remember in the 6 weeks school holidays during December and January it rained pretty much the whole of the holidays. Also the last half term we had at Easter, the same thing happened, it rained! We were stuck indoors most of the time. My boys were so bored and I felt quite depressed. When we did go out we found places were isolated and we hardly ever saw other people which made it feel a bit surreal. I prefer to be at places that have an atmosphere and other people are looking happy and enjoying themselves.

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Just out of interest, really. I've read countless times on here how there is no 'culture' in Australia or people are missing the 'buzz' of the UK while they are living there. What do people actually mean by these words and in what way are they missing in Australia? I'm working on the principle that you guys don't mean hanging out at museums (which I, BTW love but with kids...) and watching the ballet all the time! lol

 

As it's the half-term hols and we've all been off this week (OH included), we've obviously been taking full advantage of doing 'qulaity' (and cheap :err:) activities together as a family, as you do. On Bank Holiday Monday we went to the Lord Mayor's Show here in Birmingham, which was billled as 'A fun day out for the whole family' (you just know it's gonna be downhill from there!). Well, in a word, all I can say is DIRE - some tired, old bouncy castles; the police showing off their dogs and car sirens; the fire brigade warning the public to install smoke alarms and the piece de resistance, some mediocre bands and 'multi-cultural' music on a tiny stage. There was a very poor turn-out and just no atmosphere!!

 

We went to Windsor later in the week - to go to Legoland but spent a day pottering around the town as well. Lovely castle (never went inside, family ticket = 41 pounds) and Eton's cute, never knew the College would look like that, thought it was set in grounds in the countryside. Anyway, Windsor High St, just like all the others in England, same shops, same grimness, same chavs.

 

And then there's Legoland, well 37 pounds per adult to get in and 27 pounds per child (we had kids go free vouchers, otherwise it would have been a no-no). The shortest queue we were in was 1 hour 10 minutes long. They do a service called q-bot, which you can get at an additional 10 pounds per person - it's a fancy gadget that queues in a virtual queue for you and then alerts you when it's time to get on your ride so that you don't have to stand for an hour plus carrying a two tonne, crying four year old who has had enough of it all by midday and just wants to go home... But I think at the price paid for admission, I expect some sort of value for money, without having to pay even more on top - now that's very British and we just take it. Anyway, in 9 hours, we went on 6 rides!!! (Not one goes upsidedown).

 

I spent my teenage years in beautiful, historic Lincoln (same High St as Windsor and all the other cities in the UK), where I was born and it is close to my heart, so I haven't always lived in an ugly, industrial city and apart from old buildings and history, I still see no 'culture', 'tradtion' or 'buzz'. On a day-to-day basis, weekends and holidays, what is there to DO here that is better than what's available in Oz? I've got loads more to say but now run the risk of being boring, so let's have your ideas.... :confused:

As the west Midlands seems quite close to you ,try the journey i have just been on ......I went to Bidford on Avon to play golf , glorious day , fantastic scenery.

Came into the clubhouse ,watched the fa cup final.

On the way home drove past Anne Hathaways cottage ,via Stratford on Avon , past the oldest Anglo Saxon church in England , and past the Bulls Head a 16th century pub and on through Henley in Arden with its 11th Century church .........a 20 mile journey.......is that enough culture for you?


BUT I DONT FEEL AFRAID

AS LONG AS I GAZE AT

WATERLOO SUNSET

IAM IN PARADISE

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Guest nikkichap

I totally agree. The culture is there and you don't have to look hard forit. There is always something for everyone. I've not been to Stratford upon Avon But I definately want to visit in the near future. I love the fact that you don't have to travel far to see the sights and take in the culture. In OZ we would often drive 3 or 4 hours just to go to a different beach or different park and quite often feel disappointed. I'm in the south of England and there is just so much to see and do which we took for granted before. I really want to explore the rest of the UK.

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Croyde bay ,Devon

North Yorkshire

Northumberland

West highlands of scotland

North wales

 

( closer to home for me )- stratford ,warwick castle ,in fact Warwickshire full stop

 

within 2 hrs - paris - fantastic

within 8 hours - south of france - magnificent


BUT I DONT FEEL AFRAID

AS LONG AS I GAZE AT

WATERLOO SUNSET

IAM IN PARADISE

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Guest psmdwaiting
Croyde bay ,Devon

North Yorkshire

Northumberland

West highlands of scotland

North wales

 

( closer to home for me )- stratford ,warwick castle ,in fact Warwickshire full stop

 

within 2 hrs - paris - fantastic

within 8 hours - south of france - magnificent

 

I have spent the day on Croyde beach today and as lovely as it is... It was jam packed with lots of holiday makers all trying to find a place just to chill.. even in the sea you have to fight for some space, keeping a constant eye on my Children was quite stressfull, and not to mention the amount litter around the pub play areas in the Village! Not nice.. :nah:

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I have spent the day on Croyde beach today and as lovely as it is... It was jam packed with lots of holiday makers all trying to find a place just to chill.. even in the sea you have to fight for some space, keeping a constant eye on my Children was quite stressfull, and not to mention the amount litter around the pub play areas in the Village! Not nice.. :nah:

i hope australia is all you wish for


BUT I DONT FEEL AFRAID

AS LONG AS I GAZE AT

WATERLOO SUNSET

IAM IN PARADISE

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Half Term: Having fun with the kids during half term doesn't have to be expensive. I've been back 3 weeks now and am watching every penny. It's not hard to find things to do at very little cost.

 

What I like about being back in the UK is going to our local park and taking a football and a picnic, then having a nice walk through the forest and round the lakes and then off to the nature center and finishing up at the playpark for the kids and all it cost me was the picnic food and an ice-cream for the kids. A very inexpensive day out and fun for us all. The kids got tired out and slept for England!

 

Also been to the adventure playground which costs £1 per child and adults are free. Kids go off and play and I can sit and relax and read my book in the lovely sunshine. Gives the kids some freedom and I can relax knowing they are playing safely.

 

Today we went to Brighton which was a bit more expensive. Had a kids go free voucher to the Sealife Center and then we had a walk along the beech and went on the pier where we brought hotdogs, douhnuts and candyfloss. Had a brilliant time and then had a stroll around the lanes. Didn't buy anything but the buzz of seeing loads of people just sitting outside cafe's enjoying the sun gave me a feel good feeling.

 

For me the buzz is all about having plenty of things to do and not being limited to the beach. I found Oz boring and not much choice of things to do (depending on where you live) and back in the UK you can just jump on a train and in an hour be somewhere exciting. In OZ if we travelled for an hour we would still be on the same old road with the same old scenery and the kids asking "are we there yet"? and then being dissapointed once we get there!

 

I am glad to be back and will never moan about not having anything to do, which I did a lot of in Australia!

 

Nikki

It's great you are happy back home Nikki, but I also think it depends where you live in Australia. I did all those things you mention too with my kids, and found many free things to do with them and still do even now they are older. We were never short of places to explore, I just think it goes to show that each region here is so different.


If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”

John Quincy Adams

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