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Amaroo

Cut back on Immigrants

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Immigration Minister Chris Evans has announced a cut of 18,500 places in the skilled migration program this financial year.

 

That will be a set back for some UK hopefuls.

 

At least the BBC's, 'Wanted Down Under' programme has stopped airing. They were showing programmes from 2006/7 which gave a totally false impression of what Oz is really like now to live in. Mind it did not give a real idea in the first place.

 

Any Pom thinking of making that big move 'down under' needs to think hard. The sun sea and warmth is not everything.

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True. But it sure beats overcast skies, rain, and the doom and gloom of the tabloid press!

 

Best regards.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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PS. Admittedly we do not know all the details as yet, but the present announcements do not indicate a closing of pathways for skilled migrants.

 

Rather, it seems that applicants will have to wait longer for their applications to be granted - which is a rather different scenario.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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Cannot argue with that although today has been the warmest day this year and the UK has been hotter than Greece and down into the Med. So it ain't all bad here in Yorkshire.

 

I sat out on my front bench for coffee` in short sleeved shirt which is okay by me for March 15th.

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I recall my studies of Julius Caesar - "Beware the Ides of March" ...

 

Best regards.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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I love Oz, come down for 6 months every 18. Lived in Cyprus for 6 years working for HMG so like the warmth. Spend my time in NSW Victoria and ACT when down. Just nicely back from 7 months down.

 

Good forecast for tomorrow so can get out in the garden and start sorting.

 

Time for a shower and bed. Goodnight.

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Guest pongia

I think it will hit brits hard to with construction skills being reduced

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Remember that the Critical Skills List is merely a list that pushes certain occupations up the processing pecking order.

 

Not having an occupation on the CSL does not mean you cannot apply for (or be granted) a skilled visa. Rather, the process will take longer.

 

Best regards.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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Guest Scamp1976

I think people would be better off playing the national lottery than to apply for a Visa now if they are not on the CSL. The good news is that people who are still on the CSL will get processed even faster than they did before. So all is not bad news.

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Listening to the news today, there were calls to reduce immigration numbers in line with recession, however, people were asking for this to be a temporary measure and for the government to respond quickly by increasing immigration again when there was demand.

 

Ali


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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I think people would be better off playing the national lottery than to apply for a Visa now if they are not on the CSL. The good news is that people who are still on the CSL will get processed even faster than they did before. So all is not bad news.

 

Don't forget State and Territory Sponsored skilled visa pathways ... these rank higher in the processing pecking order than applications with CSL occupations.

 

Best regards.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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I nearly fell over when I read this!! Any idea how this cut is going to work? will it affect new applictants or everyone waiting no matter where they are in the process or will it affect people who applied after a certain date?:chatterbox::chatterbox: or is this still just talk at the moment?

 

Any ideas anyone?

 

My heart rate has increased somewhat!!!

 

Lisa

 

Okay.. forget all the questions, I've just read it all on the other posts! I feel sick!


Steve 47, Lisa 39, 2 Kids 16 + 11

PR VISA GRANTED July 09 , Validated Visa Nov 09. Living in Adelaide

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There seems to something akin to mass hysteria with many postings. Why is there the need to be so melodramatic on internet forums?

 

Intending migrants should be aware that it wasn't too long ago that waiting times for general skilled visas were 20+ months - for UK based migrants at that. Indeed, some skilled visa applicants who lodged applications more than a year ago are still waiting for their visas - though admittedly this tends to be applicants from "higher risk" countries.

 

Added to this, the number of skilled visas that is available continues to be at close to highest ever levels: the present year's skilled program (even after today's reduction) is still intended to deliver 12,500 more skilled visas than in 2008/09.

 

My view at present is that application processing times for those who are not State Sponsored or who do not have a CSL occupation are likely to move back towards what would be a longer term average of nearer a year. Is that so long to wait?

 

A sense of balance and perspective would be helpful.

 

Best regards.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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Guest AlisonC

Hello Alan,

 

I take your point on the time horizon. However, one thing that does not seem to be so readily discussed on this site is the current economic environment in Australia. And I wondered if you could enlighten me.

 

If they are cutting back on the immigrants due to the economic slow down, then I would be grateful of someone advising on the micro economies of the key districts in Australia. As people are signing to waiver all benefits for a two year period, while loosing an average of 20% on the £/$ exchange rate, I would have thought that new migrants would find all of their life savings disapating in months if they are unable to find work in Australia.

 

Any advice on the economic climate Alan?

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Hello Alan,

 

I take your point on the time horizon. However, one thing that does not seem to be so readily discussed on this site is the current economic environment in Australia. And I wondered if you could enlighten me.

 

If they are cutting back on the immigrants due to the economic slow down, then I would be grateful of someone advising on the micro economies of the key districts in Australia. As people are signing to waiver all benefits for a two year period, while loosing an average of 20% on the £/$ exchange rate, I would have thought that new migrants would find all of their life savings disapating in months if they are unable to find work in Australia.

 

Any advice on the economic climate Alan?

 

I tend not draw too many conclusions from generalities about economies - but that is a personal view.

 

Indeed, each person's ability to find work will (in my experience) be a function of their own competencies, personality, and being in the right place at the right time.

 

Best regards.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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There seems to something akin to mass hysteria with many postings. Why is there the need to be so melodramatic on internet forums?

 

Intending migrants should be aware that it wasn't too long ago that waiting times for general skilled visas were 20+ months - for UK based migrants at that. Indeed, some skilled visa applicants who lodged applications more than a year ago are still waiting for their visas - though admittedly this tends to be applicants from "higher risk" countries.

 

Added to this, the number of skilled visas that is available continues to be at close to highest ever levels: the present year's skilled program (even after today's reduction) is still intended to deliver 12,500 more skilled visas than in 2008/09.

 

My view at present is that application processing times for those who are not State Sponsored or who do not have a CSL occupation are likely to move back towards what would be a longer term average of nearer a year. Is that so long to wait?

 

A sense of balance and perspective would be helpful.

 

Best regards.

 

Thank you Alan

 

And I apologise! I did momentarily loose all perspective there!! I think I allowed myself to be over run by a galloping case of the 'what Ifs'!!

 

The emotional aspect of the emigration process (as I'm sure you know) is so consuming and rollercoster like, that when even the slightest hiccup occurs it knocks you for six. but once the new information is gathered and assimilated, we deal with it and get back up again!

 

Thank you for your calming words Alan.

 

Lisa


Steve 47, Lisa 39, 2 Kids 16 + 11

PR VISA GRANTED July 09 , Validated Visa Nov 09. Living in Adelaide

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Guest AlisonC

I take your point about the right place at the right time.................but taking your family on the hope of this premise would seem high risk to me given the current climate.

 

It may be that the lengthening of applications may actually be a blessing in disguise. As the applications progress, UK families can rely on the UK social security (should the worst happen) and ride out the worst part of the global downturn on familiar ground.

 

It may be that by the time the application is granted, the £/$ & housing market conditions may improve and people can migrate in a much healthier position than they are sacrificing during the current climate conditions..

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Thank you Alan

 

And I apologise! I did momentarily loose all perspective there!! I think I allowed myself to be over run by a galloping case of the 'what Ifs'!!

 

The emotional aspect of the emigration process (as I'm sure you know) is so consuming and rollercoster like, that when even the slightest hiccup occurs it knocks you for six. but once the new information is gathered and assimilated, we deal with it and get back up again!

 

Thank you for your calming words Alan.

 

Lisa

 

I know - I was there myself, although it was some 8 years ago. Life in limbo, rollercoaster of emotions, friends and family asking how its going ... it becomes all consuming.

 

My advice is to try not to spend too much time on the forums ... :spinny:

 

Best regards.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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I take your point about the right place at the right time.................but taking your family on the hope of this premise would seem high risk to me given the current climate.

 

It may be that the lengthening of applications may actually be a blessing in disguise. As the applications progress, UK families can rely on the UK social security (should the worst happen) and ride out the worst part of the global downturn on familiar ground.

 

It may be that by the time the application is granted, the £/$ & housing market conditions may improve and people can migrate in a much healthier position than they are sacrificing during the current climate conditions..

 

Remember that you don't have to migrate as soon as your visas come through - you might choose to holiday on one of the cheap flights to Australia to validate visas and then move some time later when the economic time is right for you.

 

Best regards.


Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com and acollett@bdhtax.com

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Alison C

 

I have just nicely returned from 7 months in Oz, being in NSW, ACT and SA. Compared to when I was last down in 2006 for 6 months the price rises are staggering. The cost of living is almost the same if not in a lot of instances higher than UK. I do not mean in gas, electric or water, I mean food and all that goes with it.

 

The $ against the £ does not help in anyway eitherway.

 

I fully appreciate the replies that may well flow in from those downunder, but facts are facts. I stayed with friends and went out shopping with them whenever. Okay, the climate wherever you are in Oz is something you cannot buy. But as a number of Oz's who have stayed with have said, "If the UK had Oz weather then they would be queuing up to get into the UK.

 

The cost of living comparative to salary is again staggering for like for like job here and in Oz. When you look at the BBC programme, "Wanted Down Under". This last series (not the 2006 repeats), 90% of the hopefuls were all quite shocked at Oz prices across the board. More this time did not follow their dream and make the move. The previous series that the BBC did a catch up on, found quite a few had returned to the UK in the main due to costs and in some cases simply could not settle.

 

It is up to each individual to make their mind up as to whether they take that big step. I believe the best chance for anyone is if they have a relative already there. On their own and in this world wide climate we are in I think people should be very careful and think long and hard. Whoever does go, I wish you well.

 

I love Australia and cannot wait to get back for another 6 months but certainly not to live there.

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Guest AlisonC

Hi Amaroo

 

Thank you for you post that is the exact type of information I was looking for.

 

When the £ was strong & the demand for Australian housing was low 5/6 years ago, immigrants were obviously reaping the benefits. Even though the cost of living now equates to the UK, I would anticipate that these 'older' migrants are still doing well as they have no mortgage overheads.

 

However, as you say, I doubt that this is the case now! It has been sometime since my last visit to Oz so any information on the current climate is welcome!

 

I have friends in Perth who say that the cost of housing in that region has escalated as it did in the UK. Did you notice anything regarding housing costs etc while you were there?

 

Thanks Amaroo

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Hi Alison,

 

Housing. I moved around and stayed in a lot of places and like UK I think a lot depends on what area you want to live in as to cost.

 

But house prices have rocketed to what they were a few years ago when I started going down. You may get a lot for a house in UK but with the exchange rate being what it is an Oz house I believe is more expensive than a relative same UK one in certain areas. On top of which a lot of Oz houses on the modern build would simply not be allowed under UK building regulations.

 

You hit the nail on the head, the older generation have not got the mortgage round the neck now in Oz. It is a leisurely day for the pensioner, breakfast, stroll for a paper, then to the RSL for a pensioner lunch, a drink, home and a siesta, evening meal, tv, bed. No worries.

 

Perth, the remotest city in the world with more people from the British Isles than anywhere in Oz. I have not been but going on many who have it is the last place in Oz I would settle. My first choice would be Adelaide if any. I found Adelaide to be the cheapest of the towns/cities I visited and spent time in.

 

I had an Oz couple stay with me not long ago who I had stayed with in Sydney. Going round ASDA the only thing they found that was more expensive here than Oz was fillet steak. On a £150 shop which we did they were astounded how cheap things were. Oz wine a lot cheaper here than there on same bottles. Beer in Aldi in Canberra was £21 for a case, the equivalent in my Aldi was £11.

 

If you can in any way, visit before committing as you will find a hell of a difference to when you were last there. It might not be so attractive now as a place to spend the rest of your life.

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Guest AlisonC

Hi Amaroo,

 

I can agree with the cost of wine in Australia - but it was our fault rather than the Australians'. The bar was an honoury bar in a wilderness lodge near the barrier reef............... we drank so much yellow champagne that we couldn't remember our names never mind how much we had neglected to write down! Needless to say you always over-compensate so it cost an arm and a leg!!

 

Anyhow, I have never been to Adelaide so I have never even contemplated living there. For some reason I have always associated Adelaide to be a kin with the USA mid-west & 'uncultured'. What is it that attracts you to Adelaide?

 

I have always liked Melbourne & there still appears to be alot of work for me there. My husband on the other hand, looks better suited to Sydney & the surrounding areas where there is more manufacturing based industries.

 

We thought that we would wait until school breaks in July & spend the entire summer holidays in Oz. Hopefully that should be sufficient time to interview/get a decent perspective on certain areas we could live in, schools etc. - or go elsewhere in the world!

 

With the downturn though, it may be that house prices begin to falter. I read a survey in one of my journals a few months ago that the Australian housing market faultered when it witnessed the slide of USA & European housing. We are putting our property in France on the market next week - fingers crossed the French buy it for € & spare me spending £s!!

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Hi,

 

Even 'Cleanskins' are more expensive than a bottle here. Mind, have sat at Fingel Bay (about a 3 hour drive north of Sydney) on the beach with a barbie going, fresh prawns from a sea farm, wine, beer and Kaluha & cream and though a sore head next morning had a ball regardless of cost.

 

Adelaide, known as the City of churches. Clean, cheaper than anywhere I have been. Possibly the best food market in Australia. Very cosmoplitan, some beautiful eatries. A beautiful climate with a dry heat as against a hot sweaty heat. 15 minute tram ride to the beach at Glenelg from the city centre. The Borrosa Valley to the north west and the Great Ocean Road to the east.

 

I found this to be the most welcoming city with its people other than inland at some very isolated places.

 

As you say re your hubby, Sydney possibly for work. other than that to me, Sydney is Australia's London. Great to visit and spend time in going everywhere. The Zoo, the Fish Market for the best fish meal you will ever have. A walk round the CBD, to the Heads, Bondi, where Cook landed at Botany Bay. The list is never ending as is London to a visitor.

 

Certainly make in depth checks re schools as they are very different to ours and can be exceptionally costly.

 

Woollongong about 2 hours down the Pacific Highway from Sydney has a lot of Poms at the steel works that went from Sheffield and around that area.

 

I would just put Adelaide in your browser and have read about it.

 

Take care

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