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Guest John Sydney

14% reduction in Immigration intake

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Guest Letasha

Oh dear! So how would that work? What I mean is how do they cut migration, by being fussy and saying no to more people - what about those who have already applied on the strength of the MODL and CSL? Will these people still have the same chance, maybe just taking longer like the ones this yr who never got in will be first in the que next yr? I just wonder how they will govern this......time will tell i suppose.

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Guest John Sydney

This is from the Daily Telegraph - Sydney

 

Again I am not sure how true it is

 

 

arr, National Political Editor March 16, 2009 12:00am

THE door is being partially closed on immigration, in an aggressive bid to protect local jobs and wages in the face of the global recession.

The Rudd Government will slash skilled migration this year by 14 per cent, hacking back permanent visas issued from 133,500 to 115,000 - a fall of 18,500.

It will be the first time in more than a decade Australia's intake has been cut, and there is no record of a mid-year reduction of this magnitude.

The move is certain to please trade unions worried about the competition from overseas workers for a shrinking number of jobs.

The Government will protect trades workers by removing their classifications from the critical skills list which sets migration priorities.

Do you support cutting immigration? Vote here, and then join the debate below.

That means no further visas this year for bricklayers, plumbers, welders, carpenters and metal fitters in the construction and manufacturing industries.

Those to be still allowed in will be professionals in IT, health, medicine and engineering where there is still strong employer demand.

Employers will not be pleased when the measures are announced today, and will warn that the decision could make it harder to get skilled workers when the economy improves.

And there are potentially thousands of families already in Australia who will be disappointed by the measure - because they will be heading home sooner than they hoped.

Around 50 per cent of permanent visas for skilled workers go to people who come here on a temporary visa, gain the sponsorship of a company, then "upgrade" to stay for good.

The cutback means far fewer will be upgrading.

The top 10 suppliers of skilled migration are Britain, India, China, South Africa, the Philippines, South Korea, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Indonesia and the United States.

In 2007-08 about 28,000 workers came from the United Kingdon, 22,000 from India and 20,000 China. And at the other end of the scale, just under 3000 came from the US, just over 3000 from Indonesia and 4150 from Sri Lanka.

The "prudent" cuts were approved by Cabinet last week and reinforce the principle that immigration intakes can vary according to economic circumstances.

Immigration Minister Chris Evans believes the overwhelming message from industry during consultations is that Australia needs a skilled migration program but migrants need to meet shortages, not compete with locals for jobs.

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Guest Gollywobbler

Hi John

 

Thanks for this. I would not be surprised if it is true.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Guest Letasha

They must be careful though as the current climate will put some of people off applying for a few yrs. Also if the fact that they are cutting down by 14% is being advertised more people (especially the riskier applicants) may be put off all together and choose to save their money rather than paying agents and the visa man/woman. This could do potentially more harm to the Australian economy than good. Just a thought

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Guest wiggly

What does this mean for us ? we have spent an age like most the last couple of years sorting things out, my hubby is taking his bricklaying vetassess in 3 weeks, does that mean there is no point in continuing ?

If they remove these trades from the CSL does this mean that it is immediate or do we have a chance in 34 weeks after he has passed to get our visa lodgement in.

if we do get our visa in, then they remove his occupation from the csl does that mean we then have no chance...

...damn but this is worst news than everything we have gone through recently in the UK

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Guest wiggly

Forgot to post this same story :

Local jobs protected by freeze on foreign workers | The Courier-Mail

 

Local jobs protected by freeze on foreign workers

Article from: Font size:DecreaseIncreaseEmail article:EmailPrint article:PrintSubmit comment:Submit comment

Stefanie Balogh

March 15, 2009 11:00pm

LOCAL building and manufacturing jobs will be firewalled, with the Rudd Government set to close the gate on about 18,500 foreign workers this year.

 

Immigration Minister Chris Evans will reveal the Government is to cut its permanent skilled migration program this financial year by 14 per cent to protect Australian jobs.

 

"Clearly the economic circumstances in Australia have changed as a result of the global financial crisis so it is prudent to reduce this year's migration intake accordingly," Senator Evans said.

 

The changes mean building and manufacturing trades will be removed from Australia's critical skills list, protecting local bricklayers, plumbers, welders, carpenters and metal fitters.

 

But employers will still be able to access skilled workers such as doctors and nurses in industries and sectors where acute skills shortages exist.

 

The critical skills list will now comprise mainly health and medical, engineering and IT workers.

 

Should we cut migration to protect local jobs?

 

Cabinet agreed last week to slash the permanent skilled migration program intake because of the worsening global economic situation.

 

The Government will reduce the planned record intake of 133,500 workers in 2008-09 to 115,000.

 

The move is expected to be welcomed by unions, which have been agitating for months for a reduction in imported labour because of the international downturn.

 

Queensland's mining sector has been gutted by the world recession, and across the state, job vacancies for skilled workers have plunged.

 

The latest Treasury figures forecast Australia's unemployment rate will peak at 7 per cent mid next year. In February, the jobless rate spiked to the highest monthly level since the 1991 recession at 5.2 per cent.

 

The reduction in this financial year's intake follows measures announced in December that resulted in only those migrants sponsored by an employer or in an occupation on the critical skills list being granted visas under the permanent skilled migration program.

 

Almost half of the permanent visas granted are to applicants already living and working in Australia.

 

Senator Evans said the Government intended to constantly review the critical skills list and remove occupations if demand for the skills could be met by Australian workers.

 

The 2009-10 migration program will be set in the May Budget and reflect the economic climate

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Guest

Immigration Minister Chris Evans will reveal the Government is to cut its permanent skilled migration program this financial year by 14 per cent to protect Australian jobs.

 

This is of coarse very worrying news, but does it affect visa's on csl already logged or those about to be?:unsure:

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Guest the dobbas
Immigration Minister Chris Evans will reveal the Government is to cut its permanent skilled migration program this financial year by 14 per cent to protect Australian jobs.

 

This is of coarse very worrying news, but does it affect visa's on csl already logged or those about to be?:unsure:

hi

the way i read it is that it is with immediate affect as it is the first time it has been altered mid term so i think it will affect everyone.

dobba

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Guest Letasha

Surely they cannot do this with immediate effect when so many peoples lives will be affected. By even having the MODL and CSL is like dangling a carrot and saying 'move here - our country doesnt have the amount of skilled people we require so give up everything and come to Oz'.

 

I sure hope this is not with immediate effect - the least they could do is set a cut off date. Does this mean people who have paid to apply for visas should get their money back due to false advertising? This could really open a can of worms eh :mad:

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What does this mean for us ? we have spent an age like most the last couple of years sorting things out, my hubby is taking his bricklaying vetassess in 3 weeks, does that mean there is no point in continuing ?

If they remove these trades from the CSL does this mean that it is immediate or do we have a chance in 34 weeks after he has passed to get our visa lodgement in.

if we do get our visa in, then they remove his occupation from the csl does that mean we then have no chance...

...damn but this is worst news than everything we have gone through recently in the UK

From the Daily Telegraph today;

 

"The Government will protect trades workers by removing their classifications from the critical skills list which sets migration priorities.That means no further visas this year for bricklayers, plumbers, welders, carpenters and metal fitters in the construction and manufacturing industries."


"640K ought to be enough for anybody." Bill Gates 1981

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From the Daily Telegraph today;

 

"The Government will protect trades workers by removing their classifications from the critical skills list which sets migration priorities.That means no further visas this year for bricklayers, plumbers, welders, carpenters and metal fitters in the construction and manufacturing industries."

 

The changes mean building and manufacturing trades will be removed from Australia's critical skills list, protecting local bricklayers, plumbers, welders, carpenters and metal fitters.

 

But employers will still be able to access skilled workers such as doctors and nurses in industries and sectors where acute skills shortages exist.

 

The critical skills list will now comprise mainly health and medical, engineering and IT workers.


"640K ought to be enough for anybody." Bill Gates 1981

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