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NURSES - Moving to Australia

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    On 4/9/2017 at 4:18 PM, Rumblyvike said:

    Hi, I'm a nurse with 20 years experience and looking to move with my family to Melbourne. I'm too old to realistically get in on an independent visa, so need a sponsored 186 visa with PR. Has anyone managed to get a 186 visa with nursing skills, as hear that they are hard to come by. I have A&E experience, but now work within public health managing school nurses. School nursing seems to be within local government in Oz, so would be happy to look at that route rather than hospital nursing. I have a degree in public health nursing and a masters in Healthcare Leadership. 

    Thanks in advance. 

    Hi,

    As you are looking at Melbourne have you considered a State Sponsored visa?  I did this and it was much quicker than 186 or independent visa.  Worth checking the Vic Gov immigration website as they often have fast-track for nurses on 457 (or whatever it is now) to convert to State Sponsored.

    School Nursing in Melbourne & Suburbs is very difficult to get in to if you are not working here already.  Very much a "who you know" job and there aren't many going.  I have previously applied for a couple of positions and spoken to the job contact who has basically advised me that the person covering the job is a "very strong candidate!" With school nurses they will often work part-time and do bank work elsewhere so they tend to do the job for a long time.  However, it may be worth looking at the rural or country vacancies as these are easier to get, but you will be a long way from Melbourne.  It would also be good to look at private schools too as they often have school nurse positions.

    Good luck.

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    On 26/06/2014 at 21:46, Paednurseclaire said:

    Oh no! Not been on here for a while, currently waiting on ANMAC. I've got a Dip HE Children's Nursing with 9yrs experience, have got 45 credits at degree level but have not topped up fully to the degree. Has anyone with a dip he only been refused registration as yet?! Is my oz dream over before it's begun?? :cry:

    Hi I know it’s been a while since you posted but I have the same;

    DipHE Actually in RNLD in 2008

    post grad certificate in epilepsy care worth 45 credits at level 6 in 2011. 

    Ive only worked in paediatrics and since my epilepsy certificate I’ve been a Band 6 afc Paediatric Epilepsy Specialist Nurse. 

    Does anyone know if this is enough to be registered with AHPRA?

    or should I top up to degree?

    or can I just get another 15 credits which I think is what would be a bachelors without Hons? 

    We were PR in 1996 to 2010 but have lived mostly in UK so will have to reapply for a RRV when our youngest finishes college June 2019. 

     

    Thanks to all for any advice, need to move back soon as Hubby & me not getting any younger (48 & 45) 

    Sharry 

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    On 2/11/2018 at 20:11, Sharry said:

    Hi I know it’s been a while since you posted but I have the same;

    DipHE Actually in RNLD in 2008

    post grad certificate in epilepsy care worth 45 credits at level 6 in 2011. 

    Ive only worked in paediatrics and since my epilepsy certificate I’ve been a Band 6 afc Paediatric Epilepsy Specialist Nurse. 

    Does anyone know if this is enough to be registered with AHPRA?

    or should I top up to degree?

    or can I just get another 15 credits which I think is what would be a bachelors without Hons? 

    We were PR in 1996 to 2010 but have lived mostly in UK so will have to reapply for a RRV when our youngest finishes college June 2019. 

     

    Thanks to all for any advice, need to move back soon as Hubby & me not getting any younger (48 & 45) 

    Sharry 

    Hi, I can’t help with registration question but will you get RRVs having been out of Australia for 8 years already? There are rules about time spent in Aus, 2 years in the last 5 or something similar and if you haven’t they want good reasons why not. There are some recent threads on this on here, I am using a small iPad and struggle to add links ( sorry) but do a search of the forum or otherwise have a read of the government page.

    Sorry, don’t mean to put a downer on things but thought it worth flagging. I don’t have all your information obviously and this wasn’t the question you asked . All the best.

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    3 hours ago, Amber Snowball said:

    Hi, I can’t help with registration question but will you get RRVs having been out of Australia for 8 years already? There are rules about time spent in Aus, 2 years in the last 5 or something similar and if you haven’t they want good reasons why not. There are some recent threads on this on here, I am using a small iPad and struggle to add links ( sorry) but do a search of the forum or otherwise have a read of the government page.

    Sorry, don’t mean to put a downer on things but thought it worth flagging. I don’t have all your information obviously and this wasn’t the question you asked . All the best.

    Hi Amber, thanks for your post, can’t see an issue with RRVs as we’ve had family bereavement and illness to sort hence we stayed back in UK, also got sister who is Aus Citizen for last 25yrs. 

    We moved back once when my in law was ill then died & it was approved for 5yrs then but should qualify for 1yr & if not we can appeal when you have a brother/sister or parent who is an Aus Citizen.

    Just found an article on NMBA though stating that DipHE RNLD, MH or Child will be assessed and likely granted with a 1yr supervision requirement so feeling a little more optimistic for my future even if I have to climb back up the ladder.

    thanks

     

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    6 hours ago, Sharry said:

    Hi Amber, thanks for your post, can’t see an issue with RRVs as we’ve had family bereavement and illness to sort hence we stayed back in UK, also got sister who is Aus Citizen for last 25yrs. 

    We moved back once when my in law was ill then died & it was approved for 5yrs then but should qualify for 1yr & if not we can appeal when you have a brother/sister or parent who is an Aus Citizen.

    Just found an article on NMBA though stating that DipHE RNLD, MH or Child will be assessed and likely granted with a 1yr supervision requirement so feeling a little more optimistic for my future even if I have to climb back up the ladder.

    thanks

     

    Super! Wasn’t trying to be a smarty pants as posts on public forums can’t have your life history in but others have had issues so just flagging it.  Glad you found something about registration though. Good luck!

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    Hi, 

    I moved over to Aus 3 years ago and was caught up right in the middle of the whole Ahpra saga.

    This is my experience.

    I qualified in 96 from project 2000 with dip He in childrens nursing. Had also done 2 uni modules (nicu intensive care & mentor ship) which did not count towards anything. As my qualification did not have the word degree in it, I was refused registration but as I was child trained could not do the 8 week bridging course so I was offered registration with 1 year supervision, which i accepted. big mistake, huge! I could not get a job with the conditions, the local nicu manager wanted to take me on but the upper hospital management wouldn’t let him because of my conditions. I then found out that a lot  of nurses with dip he were now applying through New Zealand & taking advantage of the trans mutual agreement. (This route was unknown to me previously due to being one of the early nurses caught up in it). However this route was now unavailable to me as I already had accepted registration with Ahpra. In the end the only thing I could do was do a one year uni degree top up, out here in Oz. It cost me $6000 (& it was very difficult to work during that year due to the placements, so financially it was very difficult). I hadn’t even completed my degree when I got a job on nicu, once they knew I would soon have full registration. My advice would be to go the New Zealand route. There is a very good nurses in Oz forum on Facebook which gives lots of advice on how to do this.

    Good luck,

    Natalie

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    On 26/06/2014 at 21:46, Paednurseclaire said:

    Oh no! Not been on here for a while, currently waiting on ANMAC. I've got a Dip HE Children's Nursing with 9yrs experience, have got 45 credits at degree level but have not topped up fully to the degree. Has anyone with a dip he only been refused registration as yet?! Is my oz dream over before it's begun?? :cry:

    Hi I know it’s been a while since you posted but I have the same;

    DipHE Actually in RNLD in 2008

    post grad certificate in epilepsy care worth 45 credits at level 6 in 2011. 

    Ive only worked in paediatrics and since my epilepsy certificate I’ve been a Band 6 afc Paediatric Epilepsy Specialist Nurse. 

    Does anyone know if this is enough to be registered with AHPRA?

    or should I top up to degree?

    or can I just get another 15 credits which I think is what would be a bachelors without Hons? 

    We were PR in 1996 to 2010 but have lived mostly in UK so will have to reapply for a RRV when our youngest finishes college June 2019. 

     

    Thanks to all for any advice, need to move back soon as Hubby & me not getting any younger (48 & 45) 

    Sharry 

    Edited by Sharry
    Not added content

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    Thanks so much Natalie, I did wonder about the restrictions so I think it’s going to be easier to top up to degree!!

    im not far off really and can do the units part time over 12-18mth if I get going. 

    I see Derby uni do an online course (costly though) so may go that route while I have time. 

    Youngest is at college (3rd best in the UK) & it was really tough competition for places so I’m not pulling him out, he finishes June/July 2019 so I’ve time. 

    Thank you for the info though I may see if it’s a cheaper option via NZ 

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    Hi Sharry, Nz registration has worked for a fair few nurses on the Facebook page mentioned above. The only other thing to bear in mind is that you may get registered with the notation solely qualified in disability nursing. I'm adult trained myself so not sure of the impact that has on nurses in the other branches.

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    Hi Guys,

    Just looking for a friendly bit of advice/ tips on what to do.

    We have sent off my girlfriends AHPRA registration documents earlier this month. We understand that should registration be granted in principle, she will need to present herself in Australia to finalise this, within three months.

    With that in mind, it obviously seems to make sense to us to start applying for jobs now (we would like to ideally not have to do a quick trip just to get the registration, though we will do this if required). We're going to be seeking temporary sponsorship via the upcoming TSS visas (we're not too fussed about whether it's short or medium term ones, as it is not our intention to reside in Australia permanently). It would include myself as her De Facto partner (I have already used both years of my working holiday visa). I just wanted to find out if people had experience of apply for nursing jobs prior to being granted registration. The more we read into the more difficult it seems to find sponsorship opportunists for overseas nurses (she specialises in paediatrics). We hadn't previously considered using an agency or anything like that, but would be open to this option now if people do recommend it.

    We're just a bit concerned that hospitals will not went to make a formal offer of employment to someone who has not even been granted the registration yet and is thus unable to commit to an exact start date.

    I appreciate any help/ guidance on this matter.

     

    Thanks,

    Dale & Lauren

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    Hi Dale and Lauren

    i have permanent residency but I’m currently back in UK, been here a year. I am flying back to Queensland in 4 weeks, I have applied for several jobs and heard nothing back yet I have 9 years experience and previously worked as a nurse when I was over there. I have also applied to agencies to be told until I am actually in Australia companies do not want to know. So I am flying back alone in the hope once I get there I will get a job. Good luck to you both.

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    Hi Debgav,

     

    Thanks for the quick response. It doesn't really sound promising then. I guess the issue is that we can only be in Australia for three months to apply for jobs, and then the chance of the visa being processed in that time if a job offer was made is slim to none. All we can do I guess is to just try and network as much as we can (thankfully we know a lot of nurses already working in Sydney) and just explain that as soon as registration is granted, we can move at the drop of a hat.

     

    Thanks,

    Dale

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