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Guest Scarletfever

Epilepsy concerns.

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Guest Scarletfever

Hi everyone.

 

My son is 12 and has suffered with a mild form of epilepsy called partial seizure disorder for the last 9 months or so.

 

He's under a consultant who we see every 4 - 6 weeks. The medication, that he's been on since we first became aware of his illness, controls the symptoms and we've been told that theres a very good chance that he'll either grow out of it or will live with it under control and should therefore lead a full and normal life.

 

I'm worried that we'll only find out if his illness will be problematic to our visa application late on. Both my children (I also have a 16 year old daughter) are so excited about the possibility of living in Oz, that it'll break everyone hearts if the visa falls flat on its a##e

 

I know there's quite a few members on here with medical backgrounds and would really appreciate it if anyone could give me any information

 

Dan

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Guest nj

Hi Dan,

 

if its any consolation I suffered with the same thing when I was 15 to 18. I was prescribed drugs to control it which made it difficult for me to think. I gave up taking the drugs because of the side effects and through trials, discovered how to control it, or avoid situations that triggered or made me more vulnerable. I was banned from driving for 6 years from my last seizure.

 

Its now 18 years since my last seizure and I lead a normal life, though I'm always on guard to avoid another seizure, it hasn't gone away, I know that and I have had a few narrow escapes.

 

Although I haven't got that far in the visa process, from what I've learned it shouldn't be a problem.

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Hiya due to a liver complaint we were dubious as to how the medical would go ,our agents really didnt know what the answer would be ,but told us before doing TRA and Dimia to do the meds first ,albeit theres a possibility of having to re-do them because of the time scale but at least you know before investing a few grand what the outcome of his medical will be ,,i really thought i would be doomed but im here now so dont give up and try to stay possitive.

Cal x


If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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Guest Libby1971

Hi

 

I do know how you feel as it was my biggest fear that we would be rejected on ehalth grounds too.

 

I have had epilepsy since I was 14. My daughter also has had epilepsy for the last 3 years (I can't even begin to tell you the guilt for that one).

 

However, she hasn't had a fit for 2 years now and the consultant has just said she can come of meds once we are under the care of a neurologist in Australia who can oversee it properly as we won't be here long enough for someone in the UK to do it.

 

Plus when we went for our meds we took a copy of every letter that had been involved between our GP and consultant concerning the condition. It is on the meds form to do that anyway (we found it easier to get those through the GP by the way as the consultant didn't see any reason to get them to us within the period we needed - they arrived 4 weeks afetr the meds!). The woman we saw said that everything would be okay with the information provided and we were passed for our meds. We got our visa last night so don't worry.

 

Libby

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Guest Scarletfever

Thanks for all the replies .....loads of great support and advice. I really appreciate it.

 

Dan

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Guest JoanneHattersley

I am epileptic and have been for 7 years, I had no issues with my VISA. I was diagnosed at the age of 28!!

 

HAve also just been granted permenent residency!

 

Joanne

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Guest marknrose
I am epileptic and have been for 7 years, I had no issues with my VISA. I was diagnosed at the age of 28!!

 

HAve also just been granted permenent residency!

 

Joanne

hi,

 

moving over to perth from the uk in october. We have permanent residency. Wife has controlled epilepsy. Will my wife have to pay full prescriptions costs in oz, or is there any relief for repeat prescriptions, as i can imagine this is going to be quite an expense compared to free drugs for epilepsy in uk.

Whatever the situation, there is no turning back for us.

 

rgds

mark 46, rose 45 and becky 17

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Guest kdal

Hi Dan, A very dear friend of mine suffered from epilepsy for about 3 years of his life from the age of 17 - 20, I remember the time well as we were all at the time having driving lessons. He has not had not suffered since and is in his 40's now.

I do hope that your son grows out of this as it must be worrying for you all. I cannot see that Australia will not let you into their country because your child suffers with epilepsy, would it be a case of as long as you were willing to pay for your sons medication then the migration would be o.k. still?

Keep us updated on anything new you may find about this?

 

Wishing you and your family all the very best

 

Kimx

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Guest Gollywobbler
hi,

 

moving over to perth from the uk in october. We have permanent residency. Wife has controlled epilepsy. Will my wife have to pay full prescriptions costs in oz, or is there any relief for repeat prescriptions, as i can imagine this is going to be quite an expense compared to free drugs for epilepsy in uk.

Whatever the situation, there is no turning back for us.

 

rgds

mark 46, rose 45 and becky 17

 

Hi Mark

 

Filling a scrip in Oz costs about $29 per drug prescribed, as opposed to about £7 per drug in the UK.

 

Drugs in Oz are dispensed via the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. After the first $900 or so in pay-outs during the calendar year (from you to the pharmacist) the PBS Safety Net kicks in for the remainder of the calendar year. The effect of the Safety Net is that the cost per drug comes down to about $5. At the start of the next calendar year, the same rigmarole begins all over again.

 

Run a search on Google for the Pharnaceutical Benefits Scheme, I would suggest.

 

Cheers

 

Gill

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Guest Gollywobbler
Thanks for all the replies .....loads of great support and advice. I really appreciate it.

 

Dan

 

Hi Dan

 

Run an Advanced Search on British Expats, usng "Epilepsy" as the key word and searching the Australian Immi section of the forum. You will discover LOADS of threads about this which should work wonders to help to reassure you.

 

Hope this helps

 

Gill

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Guest JoanneHattersley
hi,

 

moving over to perth from the uk in october. We have permanent residency. Wife has controlled epilepsy. Will my wife have to pay full prescriptions costs in oz, or is there any relief for repeat prescriptions, as i can imagine this is going to be quite an expense compared to free drugs for epilepsy in uk.

Whatever the situation, there is no turning back for us.

 

rgds

mark 46, rose 45 and becky 17

:spinny:

Hi Mark

 

as soon as you have medicare and use the PBS the costs tumble! I was paying full price for first 18 months and was costing me over a hundred bucks for 2 months meds. Now not even half that!:wubclub:

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Guest Scarletfever

Hiya, just an update on my sons condition...

 

He's been on particular medication now for the last year or so which we've always said didnt agree with him. He was still having upwards of 20 mild abscences a day. We bit the bullet and decided to go private to a consultant who was recommended to us in Bristol Childrens Hospital.

 

The guy was great and immediately changed his meds to another sort and we saw the difference over the first week or so. Unfortunatley, he's been admitted 3 times in the last fortnight or so after having the full blown seizure which, we were warned may happen, but nevertheless was traumatic for all concerned.

 

He is, at the moment, in Hospital after being admitted last Saturday night after another big seizure. Farcically, all the consultants and epilepsy nurses are on holiday and we're under a doctor who openly admits to "not being too clued up on epilepsy!!"

 

I've spoken to my agent about this on Friday, seeing as my visa application goes in this Friday. I don't begrudge the money it costs to apply for the visa, but I'm just worried that this may be a problem when it comes to the meds. Its simply the case that seeing as we'd be so near and have it dashed at the final furlong.

 

Anyway, just thought I'd post an update seeing as the post has been 'bumped'.

 

Dan

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Guest Working to fish

Dan

sorry to read this post and hear this news. Hopefully your son will be home sooner than later and the doctors will have sorted out the best medication for him.

Just wanted to let you know i enjoy having a laugh and joke on here with you and wish you and your family well with what you're going through. Wish your son a speedy recovery.

eddie ,tina.

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Guest EM&M

hi Dan, just picked up this thread. Im sure from what everyone else has said that you should be ok. As mentioned you will have to pay from medication.

 

Chin up hun I hope that things are bit better soon.

 

Em x

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Guest julian edwards

Hi there

I am new to the site and are experiencing similar problems with my son. Noticed your thread was posted back in februaury and was wondering if you had any more info you could share with us.

 

My eldest son of 11 suffers from epilepsy that is largely controlled by drugs however he does still experience seizures when ill or stressed. He has had epilepsy since birth and was wondering if it would effect medicals into him getting into oz. his consultant was very negative about the possibility of him getting in as he also has a mild learning disabilitiy. he is in mainstream school and coping extremely well.

 

Any further info/advice would be much appreciated.

 

cheers

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Guest Scarletfever

Hiya mate...I'm afraid I can't add a lot more info that whats been written here, but, after a load os earching and asking questions, I'll be honest, it doesnt appear that it'd be too much of a problem seeing as you're the one who'll be funding the medicines etc.

 

As far as consultants go.........don't start me off!!!:arghh:

 

We've had 'consultants' who were so far up their own backsides they looked like a letter O.

Granted, most of them know their stuff, but as far as I'm concerned, its going to come down to the Authorities on who they accept and who they don't. Bloody hell, we've had 1 consultant who wrongly identified the sort of epilepsy my son actually has!!!

 

Try not to worry too much about it...as long as its under control most of the time, I'm sure our kids will be fine..

 

Good luck anyway.

 

Dan

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Guest Gollywobbler

Hi Both

 

Robinson is essential reading for both of you, I reckon. Transcripts of Court cases are a bit boring and laborious unless one is used to skimming through the boilerplate in order to get at the guts, I admit. I've been doing it since I was a 19 year old fresher Law student and I'm 51 now. Trust me, it IS boring but it IS also worth it.

 

Robinson centred on a child who has a mild case of Down Syndrome - so mild that it is highly unlikely to affect his chances of reasonable employment - ergo financial independence - when he grows up. It seems that Medical Science is unable to prove that this child will necessarily become a burden to the Australian tax-payer via potential eligibioity for the dole via Disability Benefits. Indeed, it seems that this is unlikely to happen.

 

In 1999, DIAC thought they were on a safe wicket when Mr Seligman took them to Court over a visa refusal on medical grounds. The legislation says that "the delegate" - ie the Minister of Immi's delegate, ie the CO - MUST accept the word of the Medical Officer of the Commonwealth.

 

DIAC blundered into the assumption that they had somehow tied the rest of the planet into the MOC's Opinion. Mr Seligman's lawyers said, "Rubbish. The Australian Government does not have the power to bind the rest of the world, for a start. Secondly, the "delegate" is the only person who MUST accept the MOC's word as Gospel. That notion has no blinking effect on the rest of us. The MOC and the Delegate between them have interpreted the Law wrongly. Ergo, we are invoking the inherent jurisdiction of the Court and we want redress."

 

DIAC said, "The Court does not have inherent jurisdiction...." The Judges said, "Oh yes we do, so b***** off on that notion, DIAC. Furthermore, we find that you HAVE made an error of Law on this occasion so Game, Set & Match to Mr Seligman."

 

DIAC instantly altered the wording of the legislation but Robinson in 2005 has put a pretty unbeatable dent into their new armour. Robinson established that the MOC is not allowed to guess what the future might be for a child and is not allowed to use purely generic "experience" in judging a particular case either. Just because one child with Downs or Epilepsy has it so badly that a normal work situation really would be impossible for them once they grow up does NOT mean that the same is true for ALL children with either condition.

 

The thrust of Robinson (which is a real breakthough legally) is that DIAC & the MOC cannot doze around on the medical stuff any longer. If they cannot defend their position to the hilt legally, the Court is ready and willing to shaft them. Robinson verges on shifting the burden of proof, which is why it is such a significant development.

 

I'm sorry about the Crash Course in Law but the case is here:

 

Robinson v Minister for Immigration and Multiculturaland Indigenous Affairs (with Addendum dated 18 November 2005) [2005] FCA 1626 (10 November 2005)

 

Best wishes

 

Gill

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Guest Scarletfever

Thanks Gill. That was not only very interesting for us as a family to read but also is something I can show my sons 'real' consultant when we meet with him nearer the date for the meds.

 

Not for the first time Gill, your information on all manner of things is truly remarkable and once again, I thank you for taking the time and trouble to have posted this here.

 

:notworthy:

 

Dan

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Hi Dan hun,

 

Just picked up on this post so sorry not replied sooner, hope your son is getting better and as you always say to me "Keep you chin up" it will all turn out good in the end. Thinking about you and your family at this worrying moment but we are all here for you and give you our full support like you have given us babes. Just found this and thought it appropriate from us hun:

 

079fa9e9ea9990f243dd95f65ca043a6.jpg


Lynne :jiggy:

 

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