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KCart

Moving with older children

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1 minute ago, Tulip1 said:

It’s not fair that your mum is putting this pressure on you.  You do what you think is best for your own family.  Your mum should want that too.  Her ideals should come way below what’s best for her child and grandchildren.  

As an elderly person myself I would wholeheartedly agree with that.  She certainly shouldn't be putting pressure on them to move just because she wants to move.  I can certainly relate to being an elderly person wanting to return to my roots but there is no way I would expect my kids to come with me, just because I want to go. If she has a good social network then she should be well supported in her old age.

I do wonder how the OP's partner feels about having to leave his family behind, no doubt they arent getting any younger either.

In response to the OP's enquiry about auctions - no bargains, the converse is usually true, auctions generally drive up prices especially when you are competing with Asian money intent on buying properties.  I think the northern beaches and eastern suburbs are a bit pie in the sky unless you are coming over with several million in the bank. Newcastle or Wollongong are going to be a bit more accessible with more bang for your buck.  

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1 hour ago, KCart said:

I know i have had a look at the housing and do agree..Manly would be my choice but i have seen Belrose but really anywhere on the Northshore but it’s so expensive and often without prices .I’ve also seen auctions but don’t know if you get a bargain this way!?.Our family is in Newcastle ,Illawong ,Wollongong ,and eastern suburbs ( we would happily go here too)We do want Sydney.

No auctions are NOT a way to get a bargain. Exactly the opposite in fact.  Agents deliberately lie and give you a low estimate of the price, probably less than the owner is willing to accept.  Then when you turn up on auction day, they hope everyone will get competitive and bid against each other, driving up the price.  The actual sold price is almost always tens of thousands higher than the estimate.   It's a racket. 

If there's no price on a property, same thing. You can contact the agent and they will give you a low price, then try to bargain you up.  So whatever you're seeing on the net, add $50,000 at least.  Also don't forget the stamp duty!  Also assume that the photos are photoshopped and the property is smaller and less attractive than it looks. 

Manly is one of the most expensive suburbs in Sydney. Even an apartment will cost you more than $1 million. Median price for a house is $4 million.

https://www.realestate.com.au/nsw/manly-2095/

Honestly, unless you are moving from London, I wouldn't recommend moving to Sydney.  Even houses in the far outer suburbs are expensive (if you see one that's cheap, it's either a dump or it's not a good area).   Migrating is expensive enough without condemning yourself to huge mortgage stress too. 

One of the reasons there's a nursing shortage in Sydney is that ordinary people, like teachers and nurses, can't afford to live there any more. A bit like Cambridge or London in the UK.   

I'd suggest Newcastle.  It used to be a grungy working class town and some areas are still like that, but there are some lovely suburbs now, and housing is half the price of Sydney for an equivalent property.  Gorgeous beaches, on the doorstep of the wineries, and the dolphins of Port Stephens too.  Also there's a good train line and a good highway to Sydney, so you can pop down to Sydney for the day any time you like.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

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She’s not putting pressure -she would like to go and if i don’t go she would accept it but i guess i am feeling if i don’t do it now it will be too late . i wish i had done it sooner but i didn’t and can’t change that !  I am just getting my head round it if it is do-able .My children are the most important part of this but i won’t know if it’s a good thing  unless i try .My other half -his parents are in a home-he can see the benefits but also worried about uprooting our lives here  .We have been to Newcastle but we don’t want to live there .I realise everything you are saying about North Shore /eastern suburbs .I don’t want to be in a rough area and i want good schools.lots to think about .

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3 hours ago, KCart said:

We have been to Newcastle but we don’t want to live there .I realise everything you are saying about North Shore /eastern suburbs .I don’t want to be in a rough area and i want good schools.lots to think about .

Have you seen all of Newcastle, or just the town centre, or just the area where your family lives?   It's surprising how you can get totally the wrong impression of a large city, depending on which bits you visit.  Newcastle has rough areas, like any city that size. However it also has some lovely family-friendly suburbs and even some trendy ones.

At my work, I had a colleague who'd been transferred from the Newcastle office.   Over a year later, he was still commuting every day from Newcastle to Sydney (two hours!), because he refused to move his family to Sydney.   He felt Newcastle was a much better place to raise his children, for safety, access to amenities and schooling.  He was a senior executive who would have bought on the North Shore if he had moved.  So I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss Newcastle.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

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4 hours ago, KCart said:

.I realise everything you are saying about North Shore /eastern suburbs .I don’t want to be in a rough area and i want good schools.lots to think about .

Also, saying you only want the North Shore/Eastern suburbs is a bit like saying you're moving to London, but you can only consider Chelsea and Kensington.  They are not just the most expensive but also the poshest and most snobbish.  There are plenty of other parts of Sydney which are more affordable but not rough.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

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I live in London but not those areas.what areas in Sydney would you advise ? I have been told to avoid Western sydney ..

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52 minutes ago, KCart said:

I live in London but not those areas.what areas in Sydney would you advise ? I have been told to avoid Western sydney ..

Even that is a bit outdated. Certainly western Sydney isn't as pretty or gentrified as the eastern suburbs or the north, but it isn't the hell-hole people think it is (it was but no more).

Also with the build of the new airport in western Sydney and the expansion of the metro to Bankstown by 2024 as nd Parramatta and the new airport by around 2028 those western areas are going to become very popular with people seeking affordable space, and with that sort of migration comes huge uplift in services and property values.

Certainly don't discount the west unless you are getting your advice from someone who currently lives in the west.

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46 minutes ago, KCart said:

I live in London but not those areas.what areas in Sydney would you advise ? I have been told to avoid Western sydney ..

There are some lovely suburbs in Western Sydney too. A lot of it is prejudice, and based on outdated opinions.  I was influenced by those when I first arrived too, and discovered most of them were wrong.  People in Sydney are very tribal:  they don't often travel outside their area, so they have no idea how much things have changed. 

For instance, when I first moved to Sydney, I lived in the Eastern Suburbs. For years, I thought anything West of Glebe or South of Randwick was a wilderness.  Anything North of the Harbour Bridge was nothing but snobs and Sloane Rangers.  Then I met my second husband.

When we first moved in together, we had a flat in Five Dock -- way beyong my old Western limit!  I discovered that I loved the trendy cafes in Majors Bay, the Bay Walk, the quaint streets of Balmain, the Italian atmosphere of Leichhardt and Haberfield.   Then we started looking for a place to buy near his Mum in Gymea, and I discovered the joys of being a short drive to the ocean and the National Park, while still having my cafes and restaurants.  As it happened, we couldn't find a place we liked in Gymea so we ended up in Oatley, with its clocktower, village green, lovely walks and  fast trains to the city. 

I'll be honest, I wouldn't live further West than Five Dock/Lane Cove. The further west you go, the hotter and stickier it gets.  High summer is bad enough without living somewhere hours from the beach!

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

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Thank you ,ok that’s good to know for west Sydney ,i know if some areas family have warned me about ! Obviously like London there are some dire areas even near nicer areas…The dream is Avalon beach /Narrabeen but as you have said the prices are massively underpriced. I’m now thinking about properties that might need renovation but i need a property for all of us ! 

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2 hours ago, KCart said:

Thank you ,ok that’s good to know for west Sydney ,i know if some areas family have warned me about ! Obviously like London there are some dire areas even near nicer areas…The dream is Avalon beach /Narrabeen but as you have said the prices are massively underpriced. I’m now thinking about properties that might need renovation but i need a property for all of us ! 

Remember that Sydney covers a vast area.   All of those suburbs I mentioned are nowhere near "dire areas".  Most of the rough areas are much further west or much further south. 

The downside of Avalon Beach is transport.  You'll have to drive everywhere, as there's only the bus, no trains. Go to Google Maps and see how long it takes to get from Avalon Beach to the city in rush hour. Consider where your work is likely to be and check the transport times, remembering you may be working shifts. 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

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On 27/01/2023 at 20:46, Marisawright said:

Remember that Sydney covers a vast area.   All of those suburbs I mentioned are nowhere near "dire areas".  Most of the rough areas are much further west or much further south. 

The downside of Avalon Beach is transport.  You'll have to drive everywhere, as there's only the bus, no trains. Go to Google Maps and see how long it takes to get from Avalon Beach to the city in rush hour. Consider where your work is likely to be and check the transport times, remembering you may be working shifts. 

Yes a lot of the Sydney suburbs that traditionally people would avoid - say Marrickville - are now some of the trendiest. As @Maisawright has pointed out the inner west is perfectly civilised. Once upon a time there was a sort of bastion of poshness in Strathfield and otherwise everything between Strathfield and the City was industrial/working class, but it's very different now, the inner west is now almost entirely leafy suburbs with done up houses and nice cafes (etc). The south is also nicer than it used to be - even the Sutherland Shire is not the backwater it used to be. Things have changed a lot in recent decades!

That said, personally I wouldn't live further west than around Ryde/Concord/Strathfield. There's a sort of 'no man's land' of uninhabited land between the inner and outer west (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inner_West) and it's a completely different feel once you cross that divide. The northwest (beyond Ryde/Parramatta) also has transport issues - permanent traffic jams.

If you need a mortgage, be aware that the length of your expected working life will play a part in how much you can borrow as well.

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