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Daisyflowers

Medicals autistic child

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Hi,

I am looking for some information on immigrating to Australia with an autistic child.

I’ve read a few posts from other members in a similar situation so I understand the ‘risk’ of rejection at the medical stage. My immigration agent also warned us about the potential of rejections when we started our application. 

We have been offered a 190 and are due our medicals soon. My son is 10. He is very quiet around people, particularly adults he doesn’t know. He has some language delay- structuring of sentences/ some comprehension and in stressful situation he may choose not to answer at all. He was in full time support unit in  school, however has started making the transition to mainstream and his next semester  of primary school he will be full time mainstream, no support, and an outlook of mainstream for secondary. Although he has a language delay, SLT and school don’t seem to think this will be an issue for him navigating mainstream. He is able to socialise with his peers, is very physically able,  and academically is on a par with his peers. School will be able to provide a report on his progress (he has no other professional involvement).

However, at the medicals will the person assessing/carrying out the medicals just take the language delay as a ‘no go’ for us and not take into consideration what school have said in the report? 

 

Sorry for the length of this post! 

 

Thanks, 

 

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They will probably ask you for updated assessments, IQ, adaptive behaviour, receptive and expressive language, current skill levels etc.  They have  to determine whether, given his disability, he would be eligible for disability support in school in Australia.  It's not a matter of whether you say you won't access disability support it's whether he would be eligible for it and you could access it. They don't go on subjective reports but objective assessments. An autism diagnosis covers a whole range of deficit but the label generally rings alarm bells bells it can be very expensive. 

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Thanks @Quoll. Do you know what kind of questions they may ask him or direct toward him at the medicals? He potentially won’t want to speak to the doctor as he is really shy around people he doesn’t know. I know this won’t ‘present’ as great. I was hoping the school report regarding mainstream and his skill set would help counter this. I know it’s subjective but  I’ve also spoken to a couple people who have already immigrated on a 190 who have autistic children and children with different disabilities where there was no pathway to mainstream and would need continual support throughout their education. Is the process not as clear cut as having a disabilities means a no? 
 
thanks. 

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3 hours ago, Daisyflowers said:

Thanks @Quoll. Do you know what kind of questions they may ask him or direct toward him at the medicals? He potentially won’t want to speak to the doctor as he is really shy around people he doesn’t know. I know this won’t ‘present’ as great. I was hoping the school report regarding mainstream and his skill set would help counter this. I know it’s subjective but  I’ve also spoken to a couple people who have already immigrated on a 190 who have autistic children and children with different disabilities where there was no pathway to mainstream and would need continual support throughout their education. Is the process not as clear cut as having a disabilities means a no? 
 
thanks. 

It depends on whether the child meets the criterion for disability funding and that's why one of the agents specialising in medical issues is the one to talk to. If someone has got a visa it's because their child doesn't meet the objective criteria for disability funding. It's not the label that they're given, it's the degree of impairment that their disability causes. Only ones I've heard of have not been eligible for disability support in school.  It's a catch 22 type thing. 

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Hi, does that mean they don’t qualify because they don’t need the support as the can managed independently, or that they aren’t eligible for it despite needing it and families have to fund the specialist education themselves?

the people I know (personally) have immigrated with a child that had physical disabilities and a learning disability. But because they were of generally good health, and they were able to get reports from their health/educational professionals the visa was granted (I’m sure it was much more involved/complicated than that . It wasn’t easy for them and took along time but ultimately they got the visa). 
 

its difficult to understand the whole process! 

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Daisyflowers said:

Hi, does that mean they don’t qualify because they don’t need the support as the can managed independently, or that they aren’t eligible for it despite needing it and families have to fund the specialist education themselves?

the people I know (personally) have immigrated with a child that had physical disabilities and a learning disability. But because they were of generally good health, and they were able to get reports from their health/educational professionals the visa was granted (I’m sure it was much more involved/complicated than that . It wasn’t easy for them and took along time but ultimately they got the visa). 
 

its difficult to understand the whole process! 

Disability support is targeted at those who fall into the bottom few percent of functioning - which is why they ask for objective assessments of functioning. It’s not about general health in this case. That’s why working with an agent who specialises in this area is important. But the general rule of thumb is that if you get a visa, your kid doesn’t get support in school. If you know folk who’ve done it and their kid gets significant disability support then they’ve been extraordinarily lucky.  
Edited to say, you will most likely be ok but it would help if you have reports to say that his cognitive functioning is in the average range as is his receptive and expressive language and his adaptive behaviour (ie he’s able to cope independently in an educational setting) - or if not in the average range then in the mild range.  The issue you may have at the moment is that he is in a special setting, albeit working his way out of it (and I trust that if asked you will be up front about the support he is currently getting)

Edited by Quoll

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Thanks for the reply @Quoll. The school report will state his current situation exactly as is. It’s not something we are trying to ‘get around’,  but having an idea of what the medicals will be like and what reports I will need is great to help me get any reports sorted before we go to medicals.
Thanks for your help. 

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