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mrcactus

Decided I need a change

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13 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

If you read the thread, you'll see part of his plan is to use his time in Australia to get some Australian experience in his chosen occupation in hopes of getting PR eventually. 

Not every WHV'er does hospitality work, many of them do their usual job.

Yes I did read the thread.  It's always handy to have something to fall back on though if you decide to go travelling.

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42 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

If you read the thread, you'll see part of his plan is to use his time in Australia to get some Australian experience in his chosen occupation in hopes of getting PR eventually. 

Not every WHV'er does hospitality work, many of them do their usual job.

No one is suggesting that the OP has to do hospitality work, But it’s a good fallback if all else fails. Part of the reason hospitality is so short of staff, as explained to me on Hamilton Island, Is that the island and industry was heavily dependent on back packers, the island was packed, but many outlets closed. and I know from a family member that it’s the same in Sydney. Tracy Grimshaw highlighted this on her program. 

 

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5 hours ago, Blue Flu said:

Reason being low wages a fewer willing to work in such positions outside of back packers. 

Rubbish. Lots of people work in hospitality. $30 per hour and more on weekends isn't too bad. A lot better than being unemployed.


Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

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I've had a look at website that has rooms to rent in various locations across Australia and in my opinion they aren't that bad priced. 

Also been on a job site dedicated to travellers, backpackers etc and there are lots of jobs on there. Some with good pay and some with bad. Same as the UK, the really good pay ones require some experience in that particular area but not all. 

 

As long as this trade deal gets finalised /goes through, I'm going for it. 

As many have posted, even if I don't get PR after my WHV's, I've had some experience in a different country. Seeing as I've never been on holiday /left the UK, I think I will enjoy it either way 😁

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5 hours ago, Parley said:

Rubbish. Lots of people work in hospitality. $30 per hour and more on weekends isn't too bad. A lot better than being unemployed.

2017 study by researchers Bassina Farbenblum and Laurie Berg – considered to be the most comprehensive study of wage theft and working conditions amongst visa holders in Australia – found 77 per cent of workers in the food services industry were paid below the minimum wage. Three years later, the researchers found international students continued to experience egregious underpayment 

One eye catching datapoint from the study:

Almost a third (30%) of international students and backpackers earned $12 per hour or less.


British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

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4 hours ago, FirstWorldProblems said:

2017 study by researchers Bassina Farbenblum and Laurie Berg – considered to be the most comprehensive study of wage theft and working conditions amongst visa holders in Australia – found 77 per cent of workers in the food services industry were paid below the minimum wage. Three years later, the researchers found international students continued to experience egregious underpayment 

One eye catching datapoint from the study:

Almost a third (30%) of international students and backpackers earned $12 per hour or less.

Not in reputable establishments in 2022. Post pandemic, hotels and clubs are crying out for staff. The award governs the wages.

Small mum and dad shops often do illegally employ students who are not allowed to work more than minimal hours. Cash economy, no tax and probably a lower rate. But students who really are not allowed to work are glad to get it off the books.

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Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

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12 hours ago, Parley said:

Rubbish. Lots of people work in hospitality. $30 per hour and more on weekends isn't too bad. A lot better than being unemployed.

Okay then explain to me why so few young people will do hospitality jobs?. I live in one of Perth's prime going out areas and there are shortages galore. Plenty of young people of Uni status rent in the area as well. Few are interested in such roles, but home a lot. 

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3 minutes ago, Blue Flu said:

Okay then explain to me why so few young people will do hospitality jobs?. I live in one of Perth's prime going out areas and there are shortages galore. Plenty of young people of Uni status rent in the area as well. Few are interested in such roles, but home a lot. 

Why don't you ask them.


Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

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7 hours ago, FirstWorldProblems said:

2017 study by researchers Bassina Farbenblum and Laurie Berg – considered to be the most comprehensive study of wage theft and working conditions amongst visa holders in Australia – found 77 per cent of workers in the food services industry were paid below the minimum wage. Three years later, the researchers found international students continued to experience egregious underpayment 

One eye catching datapoint from the study:

Almost a third (30%) of international students and backpackers earned $12 per hour or less.

That market is ripe for exploitation on many fronts. But many are willing to put up with such conditions for longer term gain. Like PR. Foreign students making a big component of Australia's immigration intake.

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Just now, Parley said:

Why don't you ask them.

I have spoken to a lot. More interesting though are observations made when attempting to get a Neighbourhood Watch up. I can only speak from my locality of course.

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12 hours ago, mrcactus said:

I've had a look at website that has rooms to rent in various locations across Australia and in my opinion they aren't that bad priced. 

Also been on a job site dedicated to travellers, backpackers etc and there are lots of jobs on there. Some with good pay and some with bad. Same as the UK, the really good pay ones require some experience in that particular area but not all. 

 

As long as this trade deal gets finalised /goes through, I'm going for it. 

As many have posted, even if I don't get PR after my WHV's, I've had some experience in a different country. Seeing as I've never been on holiday /left the UK, I think I will enjoy it either way 😁

I think that is the way to look at it. It'll be something different at the very least. Perhaps, if age doesn't nullify, you could combine it with a NZ or Canadian WHV as well and extend your experience. Travel can be very unsettling though . I mean returning to former life may prove very difficul,t being most likely  mundane . 

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2 hours ago, Blue Flu said:

Okay then explain to me why so few young people will do hospitality jobs?. I live in one of Perth's prime going out areas and there are shortages galore. Plenty of young people of Uni status rent in the area as well. Few are interested in such roles, but home a lot. 

As a parent of a child who has been working in hospitality on and off for a year, its not a preferred occupation for her and a lot of her friends due to the unsociable hours. An 18/19 yr old doesn't want to work every Fri, Sat and Sun, or work till gone 11pm on a Thursday night, they want to be out themselves. Thankfully , my child wasnt relying on it as her on going occupation and was just having a gap / play year after graduating.

 The pay isnt bad tbh , from memory it was around $26 pr hour and $36 for weekends.

       Cal x

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If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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53 minutes ago, calNgary said:

As a parent of a child who has been working in hospitality on and off for a year, its not a preferred occupation for her and a lot of her friends due to the unsociable hours. An 18/19 yr old doesn't want to work every Fri, Sat and Sun, or work till gone 11pm on a Thursday night, they want to be out themselves. Thankfully , my child wasnt relying on it as her on going occupation and was just having a gap / play year after graduating.

 The pay isnt bad tbh , from memory it was around $26 pr hour and $36 for weekends.

       Cal x

There aren't many employment opportunities here in Devonport apart from hospitality.  I know 2 sisters who share a flat and both work full-time in hospitality.  One in a cafe and the other in a pub.   They earn an average of $28 an hour.  A new hotel is opening at the end of the year and both girls have put their names down for a job there.  One of them is hoping for reception work, the other bar work.  Both did hospitality at TAFE and are just waiting for a better opportunity without leaving the area.

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40 minutes ago, Toots said:

There aren't many employment opportunities here in Devonport apart from hospitality.  I know 2 sisters who share a flat and both work full-time in hospitality.  One in a cafe and the other in a pub.   They earn an average of $28 an hour.  A new hotel is opening at the end of the year and both girls have put their names down for a job there.  One of them is hoping for reception work, the other bar work.  Both did hospitality at TAFE and are just waiting for a better opportunity without leaving the area.

I have been doing it for the last 3 months as a casual job. By chance at the start of the year, i heard an interview on the radio with the Head of the Hotel's association basically saying how desperate the industry is for hospitality workers after the pandemic. He encouraged people over 50 who might like to try something different to earn some income to give it a try.

Honestly there is no need to do a hospitality course. I applied for a Gaming job on Seek and got a call back within an hour. I just had to do the RSA and RGA licencing courses before i could start. Simple to do online for a cost of about $200. Also police check and credit check reports.

I am doing about 4 shifts a week at the moment around 25 to 35 hours a weeks but could do less or more if i wanted. Base rate is $28 per hour and goes up for weekends. Sunday is around $40 per hour.

Hours are anti social but if you are single like me otherwise i would probably be home watching tv.

If you have a mortgage and need a high income it is not suitable, but if like me it would be nice to earn between $500 to $1000 a week after tax to help pay for basics of life then it is good.

 

 

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Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

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15 minutes ago, Parley said:

I have been doing it for the last 3 months as a casual job. By chance at the start of the year, i heard an interview on the radio with the Head of the Hotel's association basically saying how desperate the industry is for hospitality workers after the pandemic. He encouraged people over 50 who might like to try something different to earn some income to give it a try.

Honestly there is no need to do a hospitality course. I applied for a Gaming job on Seek and got a call back within an hour. I just had to do the RSA and RGA licencing courses before i could start. Simple to do online for a cost of about $200. Also police check and credit check reports.

I am doing about 4 shifts a week at the moment around 25 to 35 hours a weeks but could do less or more if i wanted. Base rate is $28 per hour and goes up for weekends. Sunday is around $40 per hour.

Hours are anti social but if you are single like me otherwise i would probably be home watching tv.

If you have a mortgage and need a high income it is not suitable, but if like me it would be nice to earn between $500 to $1000 a week after tax to help pay for basics of life then it is good.

 

 

Yes the girls both have their RSA & RGA certs.  Hopefully they will be successful when the new hotel opens.  They both did the receptionist course at TAFE when they were 17.

 

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22 hours ago, calNgary said:

As a parent of a child who has been working in hospitality on and off for a year, its not a preferred occupation for her and a lot of her friends due to the unsociable hours. An 18/19 yr old doesn't want to work every Fri, Sat and Sun, or work till gone 11pm on a Thursday night, they want to be out themselves. Thankfully , my child wasnt relying on it as her on going occupation and was just having a gap / play year after graduating.

 The pay isnt bad tbh , from memory it was around $26 pr hour and $36 for weekends.

       Cal x

Unsocial hours were always an issue so nothing new there. But somehow these positions got filled. These days some at least, have moved on to other ways of money making , I suppose unbeknown to parents. Only speaking for my jurisdiction obviously from observation but can't be confined to here surely. 

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On 27/06/2022 at 08:02, Blue Flu said:

Okay then explain to me why so few young people will do hospitality jobs?. I live in one of Perth's prime going out areas and there are shortages galore. Plenty of young people of Uni status rent in the area as well. Few are interested in such roles, but home a lot. 

If there are other jobs you can do and have your evenings free to go out why would you? Hospitality is bloody hard work and the hours are crap.


PR (100) moved to Perth September 2021

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On 28/06/2022 at 19:04, Jon the Hat said:

If there are other jobs you can do and have your evenings free to go out why would you? Hospitality is bloody hard work and the hours are crap.

But these jobs have been done to a wide extent by students . They have never been ideal in pay or hours. I suggest this cohort is not available to the extent perhaps as in the past as have found other more profitable means to make a buck.

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On 16/06/2022 at 23:56, mrcactus said:

Hello all. This is my first post so please forgive me if it's in the wrong section of the forums.

So, I live in the UK and I am 30 years old. Currently studying a diploma in IT with the Open University which will finish in September 2023. I've decided I need a change...a big change! I still live at home with parents, no kids and no partner. Stuck in a dead end job for the past 13/14 years and I have simply had enough. Once I renew my british passport I will then apply for my work visa for OZ in the next few months.

I am not a skilled worker so don't fall under any of the in-demand jobs over there. 

If my visa is approved, I plan on getting rid of all my belongings for some extra cash to take over there (and I think my parents would want my stuff out of my room so my brother can move out of the box room 😅)

I have tried to read as much information as I can from the OZ immigration website, forums and other places. I have a few questions:

  • If I am granted my first work visa, I can work for 6 months correct?
  • When should I apply for the 2nd year work visa?
  • How do I apply for permanent residency after completing the required amount of work and after how long?

 

Family, friends and colleagues have said go for it. I feel now, since the age has been raised from 30 to 35 and any kind of work can be done on a working holiday visa, if I don't go for it I'll regret it for the rest of my life - while still stuck in my miserable job. 

Do you have any tips, suggestions or have a missed something? Or am I dreaming of something that is completely unachievable? Since I have this in my head for the past few months, It is ALL I can think about and to be honest, it's the first time I've been excited/looking forward to something in years.

Thanks everyone 😃

 

If you have nothing to lose then go for it, it may be the best decision you ever make!

best of luck

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On 18/06/2022 at 22:19, Marisawright said:

It really depends where you are going to live in Australia. For instance, prices in Sydney are about twice the price of everywhere else in Australia, except Melbourne.  It's a bit like London, in that you can find cheap places, but they're a long way out of the city with a very long commute.  

If you can flatshare in Australia then you can flatshare when you get back to the UK.  Once you are earning a salary there's no reason why you can't manage that.

Canberra is more expensive than Sydney these days, probably because of mass covid vacancies in the Sydney CBD...some great deals around.

Melbourne is the cheapest in Australia, nearly $1000 per month cheaper than Canberra for a house. Completely insane.

 

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42 minutes ago, beketamun said:

Canberra is more expensive than Sydney these days, probably because of mass covid vacancies in the Sydney CBD...some great deals around.

Melbourne is the cheapest in Australia, nearly $1000 per month cheaper than Canberra for a house. Completely insane.

Just to be clear, we are talking rents here, not buying a property.

I agree that Melbourne is a lot cheaper than Sydney, and I'm prepared to believe it's cheaper on paper than Canberra, too.  I just wonder, if you compared equivalent properties, whether it would still be cheaper?  Byh that I mean, if you looked at properties the same distance from the CBD.   Canberra is much more compact, so you should really discount all the far-flung dormitory suburbs of Melbourne, which make the prices look cheaper than they really are.

I find it surprising that Melbourne is cheaper than the other capital cities, too.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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41 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Just to be clear, we are talking rents here, not buying a property.

I agree that Melbourne is a lot cheaper than Sydney, and I'm prepared to believe it's cheaper on paper than Canberra, too.  I just wonder, if you compared equivalent properties, whether it would still be cheaper?  Byh that I mean, if you looked at properties the same distance from the CBD.   Canberra is much more compact, so you should really discount all the far-flung dormitory suburbs of Melbourne, which make the prices look cheaper than they really are.

I find it surprising that Melbourne is cheaper than the other capital cities, too.

Honestly, that's rental prices.  And in Canberra, being Canberra...it extends out into the edge suburbs where a lot of the newer properties are, 40km long?

https://7news.com.au/business/housing-market/renting-a-property-has-never-been-more-expensive-as-new-data-shows-prices-are-soaring-amid-australias-cost-of-living-crisis-c-7513934

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2 minutes ago, beketamun said:

Honestly, that's rental prices.  And in Canberra, being Canberra...it extends out into the edge suburbs where a lot of the newer properties are, 40km long?

https://7news.com.au/business/housing-market/renting-a-property-has-never-been-more-expensive-as-new-data-shows-prices-are-soaring-amid-australias-cost-of-living-crisis-c-7513934

40km is nothing.  Greater Melbourne actually covers more square miles than Greater London.   If median rent is calculated across that area, it stands to reason that houses which are two hours' commute from the city will be much cheaper and will pull down the median figure compared to more compact cities.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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2 hours ago, Marisawright said:

40km is nothing.  Greater Melbourne actually covers more square miles than Greater London.   If median rent is calculated across that area, it stands to reason that houses which are two hours' commute from the city will be much cheaper and will pull down the median figure compared to more compact cities.

It's not though ?  I thought REISA look at inner, middle and outer zones to get the median price for each area as the best method as comparison, then combine for the overall median for the statisical area.  Obviously the numbers and distances involved will be different, but then that is a different comparison?

 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, beketamun said:

It's not though ?  I thought REISA look at inner, middle and outer zones to get the median price for each area as the best method as comparison, then combine for the overall median for the statisical area.  Obviously the numbers and distances involved will be different, but then that is a different comparison?

I haven't looked at how REISA does it, that's why I was wondering what criteria they used.  However, if they do use "inner, middle and outer zones", then the comparison between cities becomes utterly useless for cities that are different sizes, for any real practical purpose.

Let's say I'm thinking of moving from Canberra to Melbourne and I think, "ooh, the rents are cheaper".  However, when I make the move, I discover that a "middle ring" house in Melbourne is further from the city than an "outer ring" house in Canberra, and therefore in reality, life will be more expensive.  If I want to get a cheaper house, I'll have to go further away in Melbourne, which would compare in commuting distance to living out in the country around Canberra.  

Of course I don't know if that's true, but unless there is a  comparison site somewhere that shows comparative rents based on distance, i.e. within 10km from the CBD, within 20km from the CBD, within 30km from the CBD etc, then I can't make a fair and realistic comparison of like properties with like properties.

This is an example of what I mean, only this is for buying property:

https://metropole.com.au/these-are-the-most-affordable-suburbs-within-10km-of-each-cbd/

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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