Jump to content
mrcactus

Decided I need a change

Recommended Posts

17 hours ago, Geography87 said:

Hiya, my brother went to Aus on the WHV around 2014 after an injury which meant he could no longer be a skiing instructor. He did have a sympathetic boss at the restaurant he worked in in WA and he got sponsorship (he did not have years of experience in hospitality or a degree)! He's still there and now with a new baby and an Australian passport 🙂

Exactly to what I referred to. It happens a lot. Why some labour under the misconception that it is all too hard I've no idea. Australia is not 'difficult' , just knowing the right people. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Blue Flu said:

Exactly to what I referred to. It happens a lot. Why some labour under the misconception that it is all too hard I've no idea. Australia is not 'difficult' , just knowing the right people. 

I’ve always subscribed to the view that if you want something enough, you can get it.

That certainly applies to obtaining visas that offer pathway to PR and hence citizenship. You just have to make it happen.

Heck, there are people who have come from mud shacks in Asia, not too long ago, who have managed to stay in Australia permanently. For people from the UK it should be much easier.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, DIG85 said:

I’ve always subscribed to the view that if you want something enough, you can get it.

That certainly applies to obtaining visas that offer pathway to PR and hence citizenship. You just have to make it happen.

Heck, there are people who have come from mud shacks in Asia, not too long ago, who have managed to stay in Australia permanently. For people from the UK it should be much easier.

....but people who have come from mud shacks in Asia are willing to put up with anything in order to achieve their goal.  They'll live in cockroach-infested flats sharing six to a room to get through a university degree, working all hours in part-time jobs to survive.  Then they end up thousands of dollars in debt by the time they get their PR, and then they just get on with working off the debt without complaining. 

There's a difference between being determined to achieve something and having unrealistic dreams.   People need to know the size of the mountain they're proposing to climb, so they can prepare appropriately.  It's not helpful for others to say, " don't worry, it's not Everest, it's just a little hill, you'll be right". 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

....but people who have come from mud shacks in Asia are willing to put up with anything in order to achieve their goal.  They'll live in cockroach-infested flats sharing six to a room to get through a university degree, working all hours in part-time jobs to survive.  Then they end up thousands of dollars in debt by the time they get their PR, and then they just get on with working off the debt without complaining. 

There's a difference between being determined to achieve something and having unrealistic dreams.   People need to know the size of the mountain they're proposing to climb, so they can prepare appropriately.  It's not helpful for others to say, " don't worry, it's not Everest, it's just a little hill, you'll be right". 

IMO, obtaining Australian permanent residency is comfortably within the reach of any Brit who has the financial means to buy an internet connection and is sufficiently literate to search for, post on, and enter into dialogue with other contributors to, a forum for expats.

It is by no means an unrealistic dream. If everyone had your attitude there would be no immigration to Australia at all.

Edited by DIG85

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DIG85 said:

IMO, obtaining Australian permanent residency is comfortably within the reach of any Brit who has the financial means to buy an internet connection and is sufficiently literate to search for, post on, and enter into dialogue with other contributors to, a forum for expats.

It is by no means an unrealistic dream. If everyone had your attitude there would be no immigration to Australia at all.

So you don’t need a trade or qualifications? That will be news to some


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

So you don’t need a trade or qualifications? That will be news to some

That’s precisely the attitude I’m criticising. 
Bloody go and get a trade and some qualifications if you have to. But don’t say it’s impossible.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, DIG85 said:

That’s precisely the attitude I’m criticising. 
Bloody go and get a trade and some qualifications if you have to. But don’t say it’s impossible.

Who said it was impossible?

I said it was impossible for the OP to get a PR visa if he goes on a WHV now and then wants PR at the end of it.  That's just a fact.  

Yes, he could be patient, get a trade etc etc. We've already had that conversation.  Personally I think he'd be better to complete the course he's doing and get some experience in that field. No one has said there aren't options, just that all of them take time -- often years -- to come to fruition.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where has the original member that started the post gone? Not replied in days. Think that may tell us something 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Who said it was impossible?

I said it was impossible for the OP to get a PR visa if he goes on a WHV now and then wants PR at the end of it.  That's just a fact.  

Yes, he could be patient, get a trade etc etc. We've already had that conversation.  Personally I think he'd be better to complete the course he's doing and get some experience in that field. No one has said there aren't options, just that all of them take time -- often years -- to come to fruition.

Well I agree with your last sentence. But that’s a well known fact. 
It’ll take three or four years to do most degree courses. It will usually take 15 years minimum to make partner at a big law or accountancy firm. Nothing worth getting is obtainable overnight.

Edited by DIG85

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, DIG85 said:

Well I agree with your last sentence. But that’s a well known fact. 
 

It's a well known fact to you.  It's surprising how many people (like the OP) think that provided they can get to Australia somehow, some magical door will open which will let them qualify for PR without having to do the hard yards.

I've never told anyone that emigrating was impossible.  I've told people that emigrating is impossible with their current qualifications, and I've warned them that retraining can be a long hard road -- and you'd be surprised how many people don't know that.    Also let's not talk about the people who retrain and get the experience, only to find that occupation has been taken off the list.  

I guess my difficulty is that I don't understand why anyone would be so absolutely desperate to get to Australia that they'd be willing to sacrifice years and years of their life -- and probably a great deal of money, not just in fees but in wages lost -- to achieve that goal.   Australia is a nice place to live. Personally, I prefer it. But it's just preference. It's not paradise on earth, it's just another first world country.  There are just as nice places in Britain.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, DIG85 said:

IMO, obtaining Australian permanent residency is comfortably within the reach of any Brit who has the financial means to buy an internet connection and is sufficiently literate to search for, post on, and enter into dialogue with other contributors to, a forum for expats.

It is by no means an unrealistic dream. If everyone had your attitude there would be no immigration to Australia at all.

I wonder if you have an inkling into the false qualifications and education results tendered ? Or indeed the bringing in off people where little shortage of skill set exists and they end up driving a taxi or similar? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, DIG85 said:

IMO, obtaining Australian permanent residency is comfortably within the reach of any Brit who has the financial means to buy an internet connection and is sufficiently literate to search for, post on, and enter into dialogue with other contributors to, a forum for expats.

It is by no means an unrealistic dream. If everyone had your attitude there would be no immigration to Australia at all.

Quite so. The system is wide open to achieve 'favorable outcomes for those who know are to use it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

I guess my difficulty is that I don't understand why anyone would be so absolutely desperate to get to Australia that they'd be willing to sacrifice years and years of their life -- and probably a great deal of money, not just in fees but in wages lost -- to achieve that goal.   Australia is a nice place to live. Personally, I prefer it. But it's just preference. It's not paradise on earth, it's just another first world country.  There are just as nice places in Britain.

I think that when you are unhappy with your life and can't see a  ready way to improve the causes of disatisfaction, then cutting ties with everything and embarking on a drastic change can seem appealing.  Life in Australia has long been romanticised by advertising and television.  That was absolutely the case with me in 2001.  I'd grown up watching Neighbours and Home & Away -Ramsey Street and Summer Bay appealed a whole lot more than the grim working class urban sprawl of the Black Country. I'm educated and apparently intelligent enough for critical thinking, but for some reason it never crossed the mind of mid-20's me for one minute that there would be any negatives to my move.  All my problems and disatisfaction would be solved in an instant.  Naive in the extreme.

Edited by FirstWorldProblems
  • Like 5

British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

It's a well known fact to you.  It's surprising how many people (like the OP) think that provided they can get to Australia somehow, some magical door will open which will let them qualify for PR without having to do the hard yards.

I've never told anyone that emigrating was impossible.  I've told people that emigrating is impossible with their current qualifications, and I've warned them that retraining can be a long hard road -- and you'd be surprised how many people don't know that.    Also let's not talk about the people who retrain and get the experience, only to find that occupation has been taken off the list.  

I guess my difficulty is that I don't understand why anyone would be so absolutely desperate to get to Australia that they'd be willing to sacrifice years and years of their life -- and probably a great deal of money, not just in fees but in wages lost -- to achieve that goal.   Australia is a nice place to live. Personally, I prefer it. But it's just preference. It's not paradise on earth, it's just another first world country.  There are just as nice places in Britain.

It's nothing to do with magic. Just knowing how the use the system to ones advantage in order to achieve a favourable outcome. As for why, well many, the majority these days do not come from countries with the benefits of a social system that exists in Australia. Although not what it once was , it is still a darn sight better than most developing world countries. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Marisawright said:

....but people who have come from mud shacks in Asia are willing to put up with anything in order to achieve their goal.  They'll live in cockroach-infested flats sharing six to a room to get through a university degree, working all hours in part-time jobs to survive.  Then they end up thousands of dollars in debt by the time they get their PR, and then they just get on with working off the debt without complaining. 

There's a difference between being determined to achieve something and having unrealistic dreams.   People need to know the size of the mountain they're proposing to climb, so they can prepare appropriately.  It's not helpful for others to say, " don't worry, it's not Everest, it's just a little hill, you'll be right". 

The black economy sucks a lot of that up these days. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am still here. I'm just reading all of your replies. Anyway, as someone mentioned before I can't do anything until the trade deal has gone through. 

I'm not saying all my problems will be solved by moving to a different country but again, as someone said even if after the 3 years of working on a visa and I have to come home then it's 3 years of experience, travel etc in a different country... And that's how I'm looking at it now. 

  • Like 4
  • Congratulations 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mrcactus said:

I am still here. I'm just reading all of your replies. Anyway, as someone mentioned before I can't do anything until the trade deal has gone through. 

I'm not saying all my problems will be solved by moving to a different country but again, as someone said even if after the 3 years of working on a visa and I have to come home then it's 3 years of experience, travel etc in a different country... And that's how I'm looking at it now. 

Have you spoke to a migrant agent? They will confirm one way or the other if it is possible. Only you can sort yourself out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Phil1712 said:

Have you spoke to a migrant agent? They will confirm one way or the other if it is possible. Only you can sort yourself out.

That's my next step. Like I said, still can't do anything until the deal goes through anyway so I have a bit of time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, mrcactus said:

That's my next step. Like I said, still can't do anything until the deal goes through anyway so I have a bit of time. 

I wish you the best of luck in what ever you decide. Don't let knobs like me put you down. Chase your dreams and make sure you win the race. 

 

Edited by Phil1712
Swearing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 25/06/2022 at 00:01, mrcactus said:

That's my next step. Like I said, still can't do anything until the deal goes through anyway so I have a bit of time. 

Hospitality industry is desperately short of staff everywhere. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ramot said:

Hospitality industry is desperately short of staff everywhere. 

Reason being low wages a fewer willing to work in such positions outside of back packers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Blue Flu said:

Reason being low wages a fewer willing to work in such positions outside of back packers. 

As mrcactus would be coming as a backpacker I thought my post was relevant. I’m not entering. a discussion about low wages.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ramot said:

As mrcactus would be coming as a backpacker I thought my post was relevant. I’m not entering. a discussion about low wages.

Nothing to do with your post being irrelevant, just as mrcactus should equally be aware of the low wages paid in a high cost country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ramot said:

As mrcactus would be coming as a backpacker I thought my post was relevant. I’m not entering. a discussion about low wages.

If mrcactus is interested the average wage for bar staff and baristas is $28 per hour.  Depends on experience.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Toots said:

If mrcactus is interested the average wage for bar staff and baristas is $28 per hour.  Depends on experience.

If you read the thread, you'll see part of his plan is to use his time in Australia to get some Australian experience in his chosen occupation in hopes of getting PR eventually. 

Not every WHV'er does hospitality work, many of them do their usual job.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×