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mrcactus

Decided I need a change

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11 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

I think if the OP does make the move they should do so with the expectation that they will have to return home at the end.  It’s very true some get to stay but only if they meet the usual criteria to do so.  It’s reasonable that over a 2 year period some will find partners and get to stay that way and some might manage the final work experience needed to get a skilled visa/sponsorship.  For the rest of them, it’s home-time.  This shouldn’t deter the OP.  They have no home commitments and it’s a big world out there.  I’d say go for it and enjoy it. I have grown up sons that have both lived in Australia for over 10 years now.  They both had PR when they went so never had these issues.  They have met many friends over those years that went on a WHV and have said about the great lengths some have gone to in order to stay.  Many bounce around on student visas (meaning they are skint because they can only work part time) and others hope to meet a partner.  Some have managed to stay but many have to give up and go home.  Some of those have been in bits as they honestly thought they’d find a way to stay once there.  I am not in any way being negative to the OP, quite the opposite as I think they should save hard and make it happen.  It’s important not to give false hope, especially when they are still asking how they’d get their residency at the end.  OP, go for it, enjoy it for what it is and anything else is a bonus. Good luck.  
 

The  2 of our children who followed us to Australia, came without PR. Our son came the student route, as a mature student, had a very tough time gaining PR, through no fault of his own, due to the labour government immigration minister Chris Evans,  changed the rules retrospectively overnight twice!! It took 3 years of study through to an MBA, and a further 31/2 years working while on a bridging visa, to be one of the few ex students to gain  PR.

Our daughter came on a WHV at almost the last age she was eligible. She met her partner the first night she was in Sydney!!! through a mutual friend, she also managed to be employed on a 457, as she was well qualified. They are still together!

So it can happen. Many of their friends also came the WHV route, but I don’t know if it’s harder these days

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13 minutes ago, ramot said:

The  2 of our children who followed us to Australia, came without PR. Our son came the student route, as a mature student, had a very tough time gaining PR, through no fault of his own, due to the labour government immigration minister Chris Evans,  changed the rules retrospectively overnight twice!! It took 3 years of study through to an MBA, and a further 31/2 years working while on a bridging visa, to be one of the few ex students to gain  PR.

Our daughter came on a WHV at almost the last age she was eligible. She met her partner the first night she was in Sydney!!! through a mutual friend, she also managed to be employed on a 457, as she was well qualified. They are still together!

So it can happen. Many of their friends also came the WHV route, but I don’t know if it’s harder these days

It certainly can happen.  My sisters best friend tried to persuade her to go to Australia on a WHV in the late 80’s as she didn’t want to go alone.  My sister didn’t want to as she had a boyfriend so her friend took the leap and went anyway.   She met and married an Australian and they are still together there today.  I guess many manage this route and it will be genuine but some will no doubt see citizens as a visa magnet and use them which is very sad.  

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The old saying if you want something hard enough....There are always ways. Question may ne posed is it worth the expense and effort. Australia very similar to UK these days , but that's another topic. 

I suspect the OP will be fully of the understanding that staying on will be not a certainty. But one thing I know, is the back packer grape vine is full of ideas on this matter among a hundred others. 

The first thing is for the OP to get enough of the necessary, to enable his journey to proceed. The rest will follow will way or another. 

Perhaps some place a little too much integrity though on the immigration process? Just saying. 

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Maybe I'm being too pessimistic I don't know. My main fear is, that if I go on a work visa and for whatever reason this doesn't lead to any sort of permanent residency, my parents may downgrade our council house to a 2 bed, then if I come back I'll have to privately rent and I can't afford to do that now let alone in a few years.

Maybe I'll just save all my cash out there and have enough to come back with, who knows hahaha

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6 hours ago, Ausvisitor said:

Yes it's gotten so bureaucratic nowadays I fully expect the next iteration of the rules to involve having to video tape your "encounters together" and attach it to the immi portal for the case officer to verify you are actually in a full relationship 

I have heard from people in immigration that they have, indeed, been sent quite a few pornographic videos to evidence the relationship - highly amusing to them all.

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1 minute ago, mrcactus said:

Maybe I'm being too pessimistic I don't know. My main fear is, that if I go on a work visa and for whatever reason this doesn't lead to any sort of permanent residency, my parents may downgrade our council house to a 2 bed, then if I come back I'll have to privately rent and I can't afford to do that now let alone in a few years.

Maybe I'll just save all my cash out there and have enough to come back with, who knows hahaha

At 30 odd dont you think that finding a place of your own would be a good idea anyway?  Your cash will disappear quite quickly here especially if you plan on seeing more of the country than just one or two capitals

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13 minutes ago, mrcactus said:

Maybe I'm being too pessimistic I don't know. My main fear is, that if I go on a work visa and for whatever reason this doesn't lead to any sort of permanent residency, my parents may downgrade our council house to a 2 bed, then if I come back I'll have to privately rent and I can't afford to do that now let alone in a few years.

Maybe I'll just save all my cash out there and have enough to come back with, who knows hahaha

Providing you can save. The Back packers life , was in least in the past, was one of going out most nights, boozing considerably and lots of 'human' relations. I experienced it in Cairns and Darwin . Perhaps down south , it's early too bed and off to well paid job in the morning? 

Surely your parents can hang onto the council flat for a couple of years? 

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16 minutes ago, Quoll said:

I have heard from people in immigration that they have, indeed, been sent quite a few pornographic videos to evidence the relationship - highly amusing to them all.

There's got to be some perks in the job I guess. Although not sure what evidence that would present. My knowledge was in London, when immigration arrived early morning to check on neighbours living arrangements. They looked at things like double tooth brushes , clothes in wardrobe. Things like that. All things that can easily be placed for appearance for those in the know of course. 

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1 hour ago, mrcactus said:

Maybe I'm being too pessimistic I don't know. My main fear is, that if I go on a work visa and for whatever reason this doesn't lead to any sort of permanent residency, my parents may downgrade our council house to a 2 bed, then if I come back I'll have to privately rent and I can't afford to do that now let alone in a few years.

If you can't afford to privately rent in the UK, how do you plan to afford it in Australia?  Rentals are very expensive here.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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11 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

If you can't afford to privately rent in the UK, how do you plan to afford it in Australia?  Rentals are very expensive here.

I was looking at house shares/renting a room. I had a look briefly at different locations in Australia and didn't seem that bad, price wise. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, mrcactus said:

Maybe I'm being too pessimistic I don't know. My main fear is, that if I go on a work visa and for whatever reason this doesn't lead to any sort of permanent residency, my parents may downgrade our council house to a 2 bed, then if I come back I'll have to privately rent and I can't afford to do that now let alone in a few years.

Maybe I'll just save all my cash out there and have enough to come back with, who knows hahaha

Look on the bright side and treat the WHV as a bit of an adventure with some work thrown in along the way to tide you over.  I do know of a few backpackers who did manage to save quite a bit of cash and get out and enjoy themselves too as well as do a fair bit of travel.  

When you do return to the UK (if you don't get permanent residency) try house/flat sharing with people your own age.  Probably quite affordable that way.

 

Edited by Toots

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12 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

If you can't afford to privately rent in the UK, how do you plan to afford it in Australia?  Rentals are very expensive here.

I can second that, they are shocking. Much higher than the UK. Sydney and Melbourne rental prices right now make London seem cheap

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15 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

If you can't afford to privately rent in the UK, how do you plan to afford it in Australia?  Rentals are very expensive here.

I knew many backpackers on their WHV who shared houses usually in the Coogee/Bondi areas.  I don't know how they got away with it really as there were a LOT of them sharing the houses.  Mostly of the young male variety.  I think the females were a bit more fussy.  😋  Quite a few of them worked as casuals in my workplace.

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36 minutes ago, mrcactus said:

I was looking at house shares/renting a room. I had a look briefly at different locations in Australia and didn't seem that bad, price wise. 

It really depends where you are going to live in Australia. For instance, prices in Sydney are about twice the price of everywhere else in Australia, except Melbourne.  It's a bit like London, in that you can find cheap places, but they're a long way out of the city with a very long commute.  

If you can flatshare in Australia then you can flatshare when you get back to the UK.  Once you are earning a salary there's no reason why you can't manage that.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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The main reason I really wouldn't want to come back to the UK is I've lived here all my life, never been on holiday and want a fresh start... New place, new people, new everything. 

I'm just so fed up right now I can't even put it into words😣

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1 hour ago, mrcactus said:

The main reason I really wouldn't want to come back to the UK is I've lived here all my life, never been on holiday and want a fresh start... New place, new people, new everything. 

I'm just so fed up right now I can't even put it into words😣

Very relatable. Yet many don't understand.

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Carpenter from the US | Waiting on my 190 grant for NSW with 75 points.
Started migration process
: April 2019 | Vetassess : December 2019 (Belfast Ireland) |
 PTE : Dec 2019  (two attempts in San Antonio, TX) | 190 and 189 EOI applied for : February 2020 | Invited (190) : 13th March, 2020 Applied : 30 March, 2020 | Waiting for CO contact as of 30 March 2020.

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2 hours ago, mrcactus said:

The main reason I really wouldn't want to come back to the UK is I've lived here all my life, never been on holiday and want a fresh start... New place, new people, new everything. 

I'm just so fed up right now I can't even put it into words😣

I genuinely feel for you.

 I did my nurse training purely because it meant, at that time, I could work almost anywhere. It was my ticket out of my shitty life. 
Moving to Australia was an extreme path to take but I couldn’t really fathom another way. I just wanted out.

Australia was good to me and I was there for 13 years, now back in the uk. 

Now that said,  it doesn’t matter where you are, your issues, worries, personality flaws will still be there, so don’t think it’s a silver bullet!  All your “junk” moves with you!
I think you need to do some more research and saving. Nothing will change unless you make it!

Find out about other countries, what qualifications and experience you need. Do they still do emigration fairs? I went to a few back in 2005 when I was planning to move. Gather lots of info. A registered migration agent could help maybe with a strategy, if there is one,  for a small fee. There are a few who post regularly on here.

Good luck. Keep plugging away and try not to let it grind you down. I can still remember the absolute desperation I felt back then, like staring into a bottomless black hole.
If emigration isn’t a realistic option, then if the working holiday visa becomes an option then do it, embrace the adventure and experience, who knows what will happen. Try and find the light in the darkness. Sending lots of positive vibes to you! 

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8 hours ago, mrcactus said:

The main reason I really wouldn't want to come back to the UK is I've lived here all my life, never been on holiday and want a fresh start... New place, new people, new everything. 

I'm just so fed up right now I can't even put it into words😣

That's understandable. The reality is that you could have a nice life anywhere.  Australia is probably not the answer.  It may look like a paradise on TV but it's not. It suits some people, they come and love it, but equally, many people hate it and end up going home and realising they can have a better life somewhere new in the UK -- or maybe even in another country altogether.

I think the main thing, for you, is that you need something as a circuit-breaker.  Something to get you out of the grind you're in.  So I'd stop worrying about whether you'll be able to stay permanently. Treat it as an adventure and just enjoy it.  You will feel more confident by the end of it and will probably see life differently by then anyway.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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10 hours ago, mrcactus said:

The main reason I really wouldn't want to come back to the UK is I've lived here all my life, never been on holiday and want a fresh start... New place, new people, new everything. 

I'm just so fed up right now I can't even put it into words😣

It might be easier for you to move to a different part of UK for starters - much cheaper and just as much adventure. Moving away from your parents is always going to be the best option for you to grow to be the person you want to be.  Remember the old saying - wherever you go, there you are.  You are still going to be the same person, changing countries isn't the magic bullet and you can make smaller, more immediate changes which will take your life in a different direction.

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Posted (edited)
On 16/06/2022 at 23:56, mrcactus said:

Hello all. This is my first post so please forgive me if it's in the wrong section of the forums.

So, I live in the UK and I am 30 years old. Currently studying a diploma in IT with the Open University which will finish in September 2023. I've decided I need a change...a big change! I still live at home with parents, no kids and no partner. Stuck in a dead end job for the past 13/14 years and I have simply had enough. Once I renew my british passport I will then apply for my work visa for OZ in the next few months.

I am not a skilled worker so don't fall under any of the in-demand jobs over there. 

If my visa is approved, I plan on getting rid of all my belongings for some extra cash to take over there (and I think my parents would want my stuff out of my room so my brother can move out of the box room 😅)

I have tried to read as much information as I can from the OZ immigration website, forums and other places. I have a few questions:

  • If I am granted my first work visa, I can work for 6 months correct?
  • When should I apply for the 2nd year work visa?
  • How do I apply for permanent residency after completing the required amount of work and after how long?

 

Family, friends and colleagues have said go for it. I feel now, since the age has been raised from 30 to 35 and any kind of work can be done on a working holiday visa, if I don't go for it I'll regret it for the rest of my life - while still stuck in my miserable job. 

Do you have any tips, suggestions or have a missed something? Or am I dreaming of something that is completely unachievable? Since I have this in my head for the past few months, It is ALL I can think about and to be honest, it's the first time I've been excited/looking forward to something in years.

Thanks everyone 😃

 

This is going to sound weird, but go skydiving. Jumping out of an aeroplane will change your life. You won't be the same person when you land.

It will change your life much more than moving to Australia.

Edited by newjez
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Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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13 hours ago, mrcactus said:

I was looking at house shares/renting a room. I had a look briefly at different locations in Australia and didn't seem that bad, price wise. 

I'd suggest highly competitive at the moment with the rental crisis. Good locations would hardly be cheap also. Those that appear to be check carefully the location. Lots of dodgy suburbs out here as well. Public transport may be limited or non existent at some locations. 

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11 hours ago, mrcactus said:

The main reason I really wouldn't want to come back to the UK is I've lived here all my life, never been on holiday and want a fresh start... New place, new people, new everything. 

I'm just so fed up right now I can't even put it into words😣

Why not go somewhere where your money will go further then? I'm thinking the well trodden path of Asia. Cheapish and different to what your used to. You'll have experiences probably never imagined, meet people from around the world, not need to work or if possible combine it with Australia. 

Although first a trial period from home, in another part of the country in say a share house could set you right. It must be very stifling in the environment you find yourself at thirty. Small step first before something more grander. Keep Asia in mind. 

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On 19/06/2022 at 02:09, newjez said:

This is going to sound weird, but go skydiving. Jumping out of an aeroplane will change your life. You won't be the same person when you land.

It will change your life much more than moving to Australia.

@newjez is right about a lot of things, but skydiving can't change your life as much as Triathlon.  Try that instead.  🙂 it's amazing!  All that time outdoors,  you boost your health and it's really friendly crowd.

If you are unable to make this working holiday happen, your Diploma in IT could open doors to the skilled migrant route.  What work do you hope to be doing once you finish your OU study?  There is a skills shortage for many IT roles right now and it's not expected to be resolved quickly.  Software developers and Testers are on the Australian skilled occupation list, as are network and systems engineers, database administrators, business analysts, trainers, support analysts and whole raft of others.  


British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

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6 hours ago, FirstWorldProblems said:

If you are unable to make this working holiday happen, your Diploma in IT could open doors to the skilled migrant route.  What work do you hope to be doing once you finish your OU study?  There is a skills shortage for many IT roles right now and it's not expected to be resolved quickly.  Software developers and Testers are on the Australian skilled occupation list, as are network and systems engineers, database administrators, business analysts, trainers, support analysts and whole raft of others.  

That was the OP's original idea:  get qualified then come on a WHV to get enough work experience, so he would be qualified for a permanent visa at the end.

Trouble is that in order to stay two years, he'd have to go and do regional work for at least 3 months of the first year. Add on gaps between contracts which are bound to happen, and he'll be lucky to get 1.5 years of experience out of his 2-year WHV.  That's not enough because he only has a diploma not a degree, so they'll knock off years to make up for the lack of degree. 

I agree that if he wasn't so desperate to get away right now, he's got time to stay in the UK and gain enough years' experience/certifications to get a permanent visa to Australia eventually.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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On 18/06/2022 at 01:34, Blue Flu said:

There are ways and don't need a university qualification. A trade will surmount. One needs a sympathetic boss willing to sponsor, not saying always easy, but have known people who got it that way. Another a Korean female who rented a room from me many years ago, always stated she would not return to Korea and did just that by actively seeking a relationship. 

 

Hiya, my brother went to Aus on the WHV around 2014 after an injury which meant he could no longer be a skiing instructor. He did have a sympathetic boss at the restaurant he worked in in WA and he got sponsorship (he did not have years of experience in hospitality or a degree)! He's still there and now with a new baby and an Australian passport 🙂

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