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mrcactus

Decided I need a change

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Hello all. This is my first post so please forgive me if it's in the wrong section of the forums.

So, I live in the UK and I am 30 years old. Currently studying a diploma in IT with the Open University which will finish in September 2023. I've decided I need a change...a big change! I still live at home with parents, no kids and no partner. Stuck in a dead end job for the past 13/14 years and I have simply had enough. Once I renew my british passport I will then apply for my work visa for OZ in the next few months.

I am not a skilled worker so don't fall under any of the in-demand jobs over there. 

If my visa is approved, I plan on getting rid of all my belongings for some extra cash to take over there (and I think my parents would want my stuff out of my room so my brother can move out of the box room 😅)

I have tried to read as much information as I can from the OZ immigration website, forums and other places. I have a few questions:

  • If I am granted my first work visa, I can work for 6 months correct?
  • When should I apply for the 2nd year work visa?
  • How do I apply for permanent residency after completing the required amount of work and after how long?

 

Family, friends and colleagues have said go for it. I feel now, since the age has been raised from 30 to 35 and any kind of work can be done on a working holiday visa, if I don't go for it I'll regret it for the rest of my life - while still stuck in my miserable job. 

Do you have any tips, suggestions or have a missed something? Or am I dreaming of something that is completely unachievable? Since I have this in my head for the past few months, It is ALL I can think about and to be honest, it's the first time I've been excited/looking forward to something in years.

Thanks everyone 😃

 

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You're talking about a Working Holiday Visa (WHV).   That will give you a full year working in Australia.  The limitation is that you can't take a permanent job.  You can work for one employer for a maximum of six months, then you need to find another employer (this requirement is currently waived but who knows how long for).

If you want to stay for a second year, then you'll need to do three months working in a regional area doing an eligible job.  The list of what you can do is here:

https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/work-holiday-417/specified-work

If you choose to do that, it's a good idea to get the 3 months out of the way at the beginning of your stay, and you can then go to Sydney or Melbourne (the best places for IT work) knowing you'll be able to stay on.  Notice that you can get a third year WHV if you fulfil certain conditions.

Once your WHV is finished, you go home.  It does not give you any right to apply for permanent residency. If you want to stay on after the WHV, you'll need to fill all the usual requirements for a skilled visa.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

You're talking about a Working Holiday Visa (WHV).   That will give you a full year working in Australia.  The limitation is that you can't take a permanent job.  You can work for one employer for a maximum of six months, then you need to find another employer (this requirement is currently waived but who knows how long for).

If you want to stay for a second year, then you'll need to do three months working in a regional area doing an eligible job.  The list of what you can do is here:

https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/work-holiday-417/specified-work

If you choose to do that, it's a good idea to get the 3 months out of the way at the beginning of your stay, and you can then go to Sydney or Melbourne (the best places for IT work) knowing you'll be able to stay on.  Notice that you can get a third year WHV if you fulfil certain conditions.

Once your WHV is finished, you go home.  It does not give you any right to apply for permanent residency. If you want to stay on after the WHV, you'll need to fill all the usual requirements for a skilled visa.  

I think you will find that has changed under the new UK/Australia Trade Agreement. I don't recall all aspects of the agreement, but do the doing away with the necessity of UK passport holders to do three months farm work in order to obtain a visa extension. 

I have crossed paths with a few who did not go home either. I suspect this may become easier, to stay on. 

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11 minutes ago, Blue Flu said:

I think you will find that has changed under the new UK/Australia Trade Agreement....

I have crossed paths with a few who did not go home either. I suspect this may become easier, to stay on. 

Has changed or will change?   

Yes, there are certainly a few who did not go home, HOWEVER, as I said, they are people who already had the skills and experience to be eligible for a skilled visa of some kind, AND they had to apply for their visa in the normal way, exactly as if they were still in the UK.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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It is what it says on the tin. A holiday with some work rights. To stay permanent you would still need to qualify as a skilled worker. 

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All I have to say.... is DO IT! 

It's like neo, unplugging from the matrix. I did it a few times in life and it is the most exhilarating and scary and wonderful time of life. Make it last 🙂

 

You will fall in love with life and never look back.

If you can, try and get yourself a skilled work VISA at some point after you travel. 


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Posted (edited)

You're cutting it fine - you will need to apply when you are 30.  But dont assume you will be eligible to stay after your holiday is over - either one year or two if you have done your rural commitment.  Edited to say, I understand from the official website that only some countries have the 35 yo leeway and, according to the website, UK is not one of them (Canada, France and RoI are the only 3 that have 35 listed but I see Italy and Denmark also increase from July)  UK has been agreed in principal but not enacted yet - we've had a change of government since then so you dont know what might happen

Edited by Quoll

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The proposed changes to the WHV system included in the UK/Aus trade deal have not been implemented yet as the deal has not been ratified. 


____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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Well, that seems like my plan has gone out of the window then. Haven't quite got the funds together for passport, visa and required amount in the bank to apply for it.

I honestly thought the trade agreement had gone through - I was wondering why the age limit for the UK hadn't changed on the immigration website.

 

Guess I'll have to look at a different country for my age. I'm 31 in July so I wont get to apply in time 😪

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5 hours ago, mrcactus said:

Well, that seems like my plan has gone out of the window then. Haven't quite got the funds together for passport, visa and required amount in the bank to apply for it.

I honestly thought the trade agreement had gone through - I was wondering why the age limit for the UK hadn't changed on the immigration website.

 

Guess I'll have to look at a different country for my age. I'm 31 in July so I wont get to apply in time 😪

I think New Zealand and Canada have the same age cut off (30) for a working holiday visa but check to make sure.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, mrcactus said:

Well, that seems like my plan has gone out of the window then. ....I honestly thought the trade agreement had gone through - I was wondering why the age limit for the UK hadn't changed on the immigration website.

You still have a window, if the age limit changes in the next few years.  It could even work in your favour, because it means you've got time to get qualified AND get some relevant work experience under your belt before you come to Australia.  

If you don't even have enough money to get your passport, visa etc, then I strongly suggest you spend some time researching what your trip will cost.  For instance, check out the price of hostels.  You're not going to land one day and get a job the very next day.  Think how long it would take you to find a job in the UK -- it's just the same in Australia.  You'll need money to live on in the meantime, and if you're not used to paying rent, that will be an adjustment.

It also bears repeating -- at the end of the WHV, you'll be going home.  The ONLY way you can get to stay is if you qualify for a skilled visa, and you've said that you don't, so it ain't gonna happen.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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Surely you just need to wait until they do ratify the new UK/Aus trade deal? 

It's scheduled to happen sometime this year, I believe. As soon as it's done you can apply then. Should give you a bit of time to save up in the meantime.

 

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5 minutes ago, NickyNook said:

Surely you just need to wait until they do ratify the new UK/Aus trade deal? 

It's scheduled to happen sometime this year, I believe. As soon as it's done you can apply then. Should give you a bit of time to save up in the meantime.

 

Yes, that's exactly what I need to do now. I'm 31 in July so if the deal is ratified this year or even next year, I still have time. I get student loans/grants for my course so was going to put that aside plus start saving what I can from wages, xmas & birthday's and any work bonuses so I have a good few thousand £'s saved up for when the visa is approved.

 

How easy/difficult would it be to work on WHV to then go to applying for residency? How would I go about getting skilled to be eligible to apply for permanent residency there?

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11 minutes ago, mrcactus said:

How easy/difficult would it be to work on WHV to then go to applying for residency? How would I go about getting skilled to be eligible to apply for permanent residency there?

You can't "get skilled" while you're on the WHV.   You'll need to get skilled before you go on the WHV.   

Just being in Australia doesn't open up any new visas that you can apply for. 

As I said, you'll often hear of people who went on a WHV and then managed to get sponsored by an employer, and eventually stay permanently.  It happens, BUT those people had all the right qualifications before they went on the WHV, and usually a year or two of experience as well.  Employers can't just sponsor anyone they feel like, they can only sponsor people who are eligible under the visa rules, and that means having the same qualifications and experience as if they applied from the UK. 

"The right qualifications" usually means a degree, unfortunately for you.  

 

 

 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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37 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

You can't "get skilled" while you're on the WHV.   You'll need to get skilled before you go on the WHV.   

Just being in Australia doesn't open up any new visas that you can apply for. 

As I said, you'll often hear of people who went on a WHV and then managed to get sponsored by an employer, and eventually stay permanently.  It happens, BUT those people had all the right qualifications before they went on the WHV, and usually a year or two of experience as well.  Employers can't just sponsor anyone they feel like, they can only sponsor people who are eligible under the visa rules, and that means having the same qualifications and experience as if they applied from the UK. 

"The right qualifications" usually means a degree, unfortunately for you.  

 

 

 

There are ways and don't need a university qualification. A trade will surmount. One needs a sympathetic boss willing to sponsor, not saying always easy, but have known people who got it that way. Another a Korean female who rented a room from me many years ago, always stated she would not return to Korea and did just that by actively seeking a relationship. 

 

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1 minute ago, Blue Flu said:

There are ways and don't need a university qualification. A trade will surmount. One needs a sympathetic boss willing to sponsor, not saying always easy, but have known people who got it that way. Another a Korean female who rented a room from me many years ago, always stated she would not return to Korea and did just that by actively seeking a relationship. 

 

The relationship option is there, but it's been made harder by the burden of proof (over 12 months of proof you are in a defacto married relationship - i.e. doing "adult things" not just good friends)

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4 minutes ago, Ausvisitor said:

The relationship option is there, but it's been made harder by the burden of proof (over 12 months of proof you are in a defacto married relationship - i.e. doing "adult things" not just good friends)

I don't think that was ever not the case. I wonder id Defacto is not treated equally as being officially married, even though not strictly legal to do so?. 

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1 hour ago, mrcactus said:

Yes, that's exactly what I need to do now. I'm 31 in July so if the deal is ratified this year or even next year, I still have time. I get student loans/grants for my course so was going to put that aside plus start saving what I can from wages, xmas & birthday's and any work bonuses so I have a good few thousand £'s saved up for when the visa is approved.

 

How easy/difficult would it be to work on WHV to then go to applying for residency? How would I go about getting skilled to be eligible to apply for permanent residency there?

I just read the new ruling. It appears once formally signed it will be implemented within two years. Another thing I read, if in a job an extension can be applied for, which sounded odd to me. Also it says there is no longer the need to leave a job after six months. The move from working holiday, to more a case of working is ever apparent at least to me. 

We are according to the government short of workers. Hence I suspect a more favourable outcome may result for many. Just be aware Australia is very expensive and finding rentals very hard. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Blue Flu said:

There are ways and don't need a university qualification. A trade will surmount. One needs a sympathetic boss willing to sponsor, not saying always easy, but have known people who got it that way.

No matter how sympathetic the boss, the boss cannot change the rules.  You either have the qualifications demanded by the Immigration department or you don't.

It's true that tradespeople don't need a degree BUT they still need a qualification (or many years equivalent experience).  I'm replying to the OP specifically, and he already has a Diploma in IT (almost).  It may be practical for him to upgrade that to a degree in a reasonable time.  Would he really want to start all over again from scratch, as a trades apprentice in the UK?  

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Blue Flu said:

I don't think that was ever not the case. I wonder id Defacto is not treated equally as being officially married, even though not strictly legal to do so?. 

Actually, it is strictly legal.  In Australian law, being de facto is almost identical to marriage in most respects.  However just moving in with someone does not mean you are de facto.  You could just be flatmates.  So there are stringent requirements to prove you've been leading a genuinely shared life for some time.  They used to be a lot less stringent but the Australian government got tired of the number of people claiming a fake de facto relationship just to stay in the country.  Now the burden of proof is verging on ludicrous.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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34 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Actually, it is strictly legal.  In Australian law, being de facto is almost identical to marriage in most respects.  However just moving in with someone does not mean you are de facto.  You could just be flatmates.  So there are stringent requirements to prove you've been leading a genuinely shared life for some time.  They used to be a lot less stringent but the Australian government got tired of the number of people claiming a fake de facto relationship just to stay in the country.  Now the burden of proof is verging on ludicrous.

My daughter and partner registered as a de facto couple with the NSW government, which made the relationship official. They obviously still had to supply all the required proof when they applied for the partner visa, but it probably helped.

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

Actually, it is strictly legal.  In Australian law, being de facto is almost identical to marriage in most respects.  However just moving in with someone does not mean you are de facto.  You could just be flatmates.  So there are stringent requirements to prove you've been leading a genuinely shared life for some time.  They used to be a lot less stringent but the Australian government got tired of the number of people claiming a fake de facto relationship just to stay in the country.  Now the burden of proof is verging on ludicrous.

Yes it's gotten so bureaucratic nowadays I fully expect the next iteration of the rules to involve having to video tape your "encounters together" and attach it to the immi portal for the case officer to verify you are actually in a full relationship 

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

No matter how sympathetic the boss, the boss cannot change the rules.  You either have the qualifications demanded by the Immigration department or you don't.

It's true that tradespeople don't need a degree BUT they still need a qualification (or many years equivalent experience).  I'm replying to the OP specifically, and he already has a Diploma in IT (almost).  It may be practical for him to upgrade that to a degree in a reasonable time.  Would he really want to start all over again from scratch, as a trades apprentice in the UK?  

They don't need to change the rules. They work within them. The entire immigration policy could well be questioned, but that's not what t5his thread is about. But yes the OP would do no harm to his chances furthering his qualifications. I'm simply stating a university degree is not the only way to enter Australia, as I thought you were suggesting. 

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Actually, it is strictly legal.  In Australian law, being de facto is almost identical to marriage in most respects.  However just moving in with someone does not mean you are de facto.  You could just be flatmates.  So there are stringent requirements to prove you've been leading a genuinely shared life for some time.  They used to be a lot less stringent but the Australian government got tired of the number of people claiming a fake de facto relationship just to stay in the country.  Now the burden of proof is verging on ludicrous.

Not quite that easy. I and my common law (de facto) visited Australia from France way back in 1994. I had to sign a declaration that being an Australian citizen, I would not sponsor her to stay in Australia. By the way she was a very highly trained professional. We had lived together for more than three years , plus she had not the least desire to remain in Australia. Whether that was legal or not, I don't know, but that is what occurred legal or not.  

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I think if the OP does make the move they should do so with the expectation that they will have to return home at the end.  It’s very true some get to stay but only if they meet the usual criteria to do so.  It’s reasonable that over a 2 year period some will find partners and get to stay that way and some might manage the final work experience needed to get a skilled visa/sponsorship.  For the rest of them, it’s home-time.  This shouldn’t deter the OP.  They have no home commitments and it’s a big world out there.  I’d say go for it and enjoy it. I have grown up sons that have both lived in Australia for over 10 years now.  They both had PR when they went so never had these issues.  They have met many friends over those years that went on a WHV and have said about the great lengths some have gone to in order to stay.  Many bounce around on student visas (meaning they are skint because they can only work part time) and others hope to meet a partner.  Some have managed to stay but many have to give up and go home.  Some of those have been in bits as they honestly thought they’d find a way to stay once there.  I am not in any way being negative to the OP, quite the opposite as I think they should save hard and make it happen.  It’s important not to give false hope, especially when they are still asking how they’d get their residency at the end.  OP, go for it, enjoy it for what it is and anything else is a bonus. Good luck.  
 

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