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13 hours ago, Marisawright said:

They're in Sydney.  Even AirBnB is $200 a night there.

Perth seems to be cheaper , I'm arriving next month , booked an AirBnB for  2.5 month  at just over A$ 7.5k , roughly  A$100 a night . hopefully I have bought  a house by the end of that term.

I'm in my 60's, never too late to have a crack at it again  🙂

 

 

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Perth is a nice enough place, but far too boring for us

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On 08/05/2022 at 20:06, Bulya said:

Saying ‘football’ here is meaningless.  There are four kinds of ‘football’ so you’ll need to be specific.  ‘Football’’ is soccer.  Rugby (Union) is a very minor game, unlike Rugby (League).  And different kinds of ‘football’ dominate in different states/territories.  For instance if you were talking to people in SA/WA/Tasmania and Polly Farmer came up in conversation they’d all know he was the legendary tap ruckman.  If you mentioned his name in say Qld/NSW they’d wonder what’s so special about a farmer nicknamed ‘Polly’.  It’s a different world here…

Having 4 kinds of footie, 5 if you include American - is a positive advantage - "Triple 'S'" in my case - "Spurs, Storm & League Swans" - football, Rugby League, Aussie Rules. When the English football season finishes next week, I'll have RL And 'Rules' to sustain me till August. I'm not so keen on RU but NSW, QLD and ACT all have teams in the Super League (?)

NSW and QLD - both RL states also have 2 Aussie Rules teams which compete in the AFL and Melbourne, hotbed of Aussie Rules nevertheless has a thriving team - Storm - in the NRL.

Some people can be "one-eyed" about the code of football they like - "aerial ping pong" , "bum sniffers", "wog ball" - Aussie Rules, both types of rugby, soccer (because of it's "ethnic" popularity. Some Pommies are the same. "I'm not interested in that Aussie crap." Which I think is a shame because once you find a team to follow, like me, you have something to talk about.  I asked two young larrikins from Wagga to help me with my NRL tips in the comp at the Surf Club. The club runs two tipping competitions for both NRL and AFL and some people do both. They'll usually have an NRL game on one screen and an AFL game on another. I watched the Giants v Carlton in Finn McCools pub yesterday with a friend who likes Carlton whilst keeping an eye on NRL games and another AFL game.

Next month is "Origin" - ie State of Origin, "state against state, mate against message", QLD v NSW, arguably more important than Australia v England and my favourite sporting event.

You can often find a pub, bar or club which shows the English, Scottish and European football games and supporters' clubs which meet to watch games. I think my team Tottenham is having its "national" meet up in Newcastle (NSW) now.

So, depending on whom I'm talking to and whichever code they like I have something to talk about with them. And if they like more than one, so much the better. Many of the Spurs fans I meet are homegrown Aussies, not homesick Pommies.

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1 hour ago, MARYROSE02 said:

Having 4 kinds of footie, 5 if you include American - is a positive advantage - "Triple 'S'" in my case - "Spurs, Storm & League Swans" - football, Rugby League, Aussie Rules. When the English football season finishes next week, I'll have RL And 'Rules' to sustain me till August. I'm not so keen on RU but NSW, QLD and ACT all have teams in the Super League (?)

NSW and QLD - both RL states also have 2 Aussie Rules teams which compete in the AFL and Melbourne, hotbed of Aussie Rules nevertheless has a thriving team - Storm - in the NRL.

Some people can be "one-eyed" about the code of football they like - "aerial ping pong" , "bum sniffers", "wog ball" - Aussie Rules, both types of rugby, soccer (because of it's "ethnic" popularity. Some Pommies are the same. "I'm not interested in that Aussie crap." Which I think is a shame because once you find a team to follow, like me, you have something to talk about.  I asked two young larrikins from Wagga to help me with my NRL tips in the comp at the Surf Club. The club runs two tipping competitions for both NRL and AFL and some people do both. They'll usually have an NRL game on one screen and an AFL game on another. I watched the Giants v Carlton in Finn McCools pub yesterday with a friend who likes Carlton whilst keeping an eye on NRL games and another AFL game.

Next month is "Origin" - ie State of Origin, "state against state, mate against message", QLD v NSW, arguably more important than Australia v England and my favourite sporting event.

You can often find a pub, bar or club which shows the English, Scottish and European football games and supporters' clubs which meet to watch games. I think my team Tottenham is having its "national" meet up in Newcastle (NSW) now.

So, depending on whom I'm talking to and whichever code they like I have something to talk about with them. And if they like more than one, so much the better. Many of the Spurs fans I meet are homegrown Aussies, not homesick Pommies.

I’ll follow anything except g ball.  Raiders, Swans/GWS for me.  Daughter took me to Manuka Oval last year for my first AFL games in nearly 50 years and it was such a different game than it was in the 70’s.  

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Actually my only real regret was moving in late 30s  &  i should have done it 10 years earlier to be honest as it would  have probably been a bit easier to adapt perhaps.    

Moving aproaching middle age -  we had to adjust to a different kind of life from the uk in terms of the social aspects .

It is hard to make new long term friends.   fortunately we do have a few now.  They are other migrants from other countries - which is of course totally fine and absolutely love spending time with them and go on trips together, stay at each others houses, even been overseas together. 

but we  actually don't have any native born Australian friends at all after 10 years. 

 at the beginning i felt sad about this but it is not at all uncommon a story so don't feel bad about it if it doesn't happen.   I second the post which said take up a sport (or any other social activity hobby or interest that gets you out and socialising with people even casually, ). even if the folk you'll be with won't be mates, at least not right away, it gives you a focus to life and something to be " involved in" and generally makes life more pleasant.  

You do learn to become extremely independent / self reliant as a family so as long as your relationship with your partner is rock solid and you can work as a team  that is the main thing. 

Don't assume your family or friends will come to visit in Oz much unless all the stars align  - in most cases they simply won't bother to at all as its too much effort or too expensive or too far.  even if they can afford to do it regularly. they probably won't.   

And .......you will also  have to make the effort when you go back to the uk to meet up with them.   You can travel 10,000 miles just to pop in to see them .... they will of course be glad to see you, it'll be like you've just left the room....... but don't expect many of them to make a special effort to get in touch and may even be hesitant to  drive an hour or two  to see you whilst you're there.  It's just the way it is. 

get comfortable and at ease with these concepts as soon as you can and it's less stress all round.  

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On 06/05/2022 at 16:01, Arcadia53 said:

Thought I’d posted this yesterday but appears for what ever reason it’s not on here 😃.

Hoping to get some reassurance advice from any expats that moved over to oz in their 40’s . I’m currently 42 and my wife is 43 . 

How did people find the move and how are they settling now ? Abu advice we should take ? The clock is ticking on our move but I’m crossing my fingers 🙏🏼🤞🏼

We moved in 2007, i was coming up to my 43rd birthday and hubby was 42.  The landscape was a little different in that we'd both secured jobs, but at the moment there are lots of gaps to fill it seems.  Our children were 11 and 7 - the move has been great for us all, we haven't regretted it.  I don't wish we'd have done it earlier as the time wasn't right then.  


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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On 06/05/2022 at 09:44, Marisawright said:

There's more age discrimination in Australia than in the UK, hands down.  However, I didn't find it was a problem unti I hit my mid-fifties

 

I was discussing this with my wife and I have a fair bit of grey in my beard and I told her that when I go for my first job interview I will shave it off that Morning.

As I was shaving my head yesterday I looked in the mirror and looked at the tan on my head and it suddenly occured to me that if I was to shave the day of my interview I woudl turn up with half my face as white as a sheet! Or worse pasty white with a touch of sunburn?

So when we arrive the deal is that I will shave as soon as we get a car, that way I can get a tan on my chin that will match my forehead.

I am planning on starting my job clean shaven, stubble for the first week and then just start shaving my head and grow my beard out again.

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18 hours ago, pob said:

I was discussing this with my wife and I have a fair bit of grey in my beard and I told her that when I go for my first job interview I will shave it off that Morning.

As I was shaving my head yesterday I looked in the mirror and looked at the tan on my head and it suddenly occured to me that if I was to shave the day of my interview I would turn up with half my face as white as a sheet! Or worse pasty white with a touch of sunburn?

So when we arrive the deal is that I will shave as soon as we get a car, that way I can get a tan on my chin that will match my forehead.

I am planning on starting my job clean shaven, stubble for the first week and then just start shaving my head and grow my beard out again.

If it makes you feel any better I am 45 but have completely silver hair and it didn't stop me getting a job.


PR (100) moved to Perth September 2021

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In this new and woke age which I would normally hate, I was happy to say that the only reason I got my last job was because I fitted the quota ie old.

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I think age discrimination would only depend on the job sector you are going into. Plus in WA if you get here, there's plenty of work. So we keep getting told anyway by the pollies. Nothing replaces rolling up your sleeves, being flexible and networking. So sport is a good way to meet people.

AFL is king in WA, so you'll need to purchase a purple guernsey (yes not jersey) and embrace it! I coach rugby union but it's hard to compete against AFL. NPL soccer is the highest level of state soccer and it's ok, to be honest it's pretty limited. Don't get me started on Perth Glory! Rugby League has a following but it's mainly kiwis and there's a limited amount of clubs. There was a pro club in WA once upon time, but it struggled and disappeared.

I disagree when people say there's not enough to do here, I like to explore new areas, travel around and we find new places all the time. Been here nearly 7 years. I'm naturally a country boy so big cities like Sydney and Melbourne wouldn't interest me past a vacation.

Anyway age won't be a barrier!

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7 hours ago, benj1980 said:

I think age discrimination would only depend on the job sector you are going into. Plus in WA if you get here, there's plenty of work. So we keep getting told anyway by the pollies. Nothing replaces rolling up your sleeves, being flexible and networking. So sport is a good way to meet people.

AFL is king in WA, so you'll need to purchase a purple guernsey (yes not jersey) and embrace it! I coach rugby union but it's hard to compete against AFL. NPL soccer is the highest level of state soccer and it's ok, to be honest it's pretty limited. Don't get me started on Perth Glory! Rugby League has a following but it's mainly kiwis and there's a limited amount of clubs. There was a pro club in WA once upon time, but it struggled and disappeared.

I disagree when people say there's not enough to do here, I like to explore new areas, travel around and we find new places all the time. Been here nearly 7 years. I'm naturally a country boy so big cities like Sydney and Melbourne wouldn't interest me past a vacation.

Anyway age won't be a barrier!

Brilliant thank you . Love this attitude . My wife did the ielts test yesterday and said it was hell on earth. The lady who ran it was a kiwi who was asking my wife why we would want to move to oz and in particular Perth haha 

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4 minutes ago, Arcadia53 said:

Brilliant thank you . Love this attitude . My wife did the ielts test yesterday and said it was hell on earth. The lady who ran it was a kiwi who was asking my wife why we would want to move to oz and in particular Perth haha 

You'll find Perth is a place you either love or hate, no middle ground.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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10 hours ago, benj1980 said:

I think age discrimination would only depend on the job sector you are going into. Plus in WA if you get here, there's plenty of work. So we keep getting told anyway by the pollies. Nothing replaces rolling up your sleeves, being flexible and networking. So sport is a good way to meet people.

AFL is king in WA, so you'll need to purchase a purple guernsey (yes not jersey) and embrace it! I coach rugby union but it's hard to compete against AFL. NPL soccer is the highest level of state soccer and it's ok, to be honest it's pretty limited. Don't get me started on Perth Glory! Rugby League has a following but it's mainly kiwis and there's a limited amount of clubs. There was a pro club in WA once upon time, but it struggled and disappeared.

I disagree when people say there's not enough to do here, I like to explore new areas, travel around and we find new places all the time. Been here nearly 7 years. I'm naturally a country boy so big cities like Sydney and Melbourne wouldn't interest me past a vacation.

Anyway age won't be a barrier!

Purple? Is that the West Coast Eagles' shirt colour!?!? Purple sounds suspiciously like the Freemantle Dockers? Not that you have to follow either. You can be "true" to your state or you can choose another team. In my case, despite them playing in "Gooner" red and white, I go for the Sydney Swans.

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

You'll find Perth is a place you either love or hate, no middle ground.

"Perth, I'm loving it?!" I've not been there for over 4 years now and it's Surfers Paradise that "I'm loving it"

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1 hour ago, MARYROSE02 said:

"Perth, I'm loving it?!" I've not been there for over 4 years now and it's Surfers Paradise that "I'm loving it"

@MARYROSE02, I have to say, that's not really any help to anyone.   I've never seen you mention a place you didn't like living in.  I think you could move to Mount Druitt and be "loving it"

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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I moved around the age of 40, I found it pretty easy to make friends and fit in. I'm in regional Australia (Hobart)

Not everyone makes their friends at school and keeps them forever and isn't open to meeting new people. I had a large group of uni friends that were my entire social life from 18 to 35. Now not a single one talks to another as far as i understand. Its not like we fell out with each other we just drifted away.

 

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2 hours ago, Marisawright said:

@MARYROSE02, I have to say, that's not really any help to anyone.   I've never seen you mention a place you didn't like living in.  I think you could move to Mount Druitt and be "loving it"

There are worse places to live in Sydney than Mt Druitt! It's got a railway station, hospital. I overcame my prejudices about "Westies" (flanno shirt with torn off arms, ACDC shirt, UGG boots, no teeth) when I worked in Penrith - 55 km from my home in Surry Hills.

It's living outside walking distance from the facilities that I need that I dislike so, whilst I love Surfers I could not live in the Hinterland or even some of the beach suburbs down towards Coolangatta where the Gold Coast Highway is a barrier between the beach and the homes to the west.

I went down to the airport today with my brother to drop a friend off and the traffic was equally unpleasant in both GC Highway and the motorway.

I suppose most of us have to make compromises, according to finances, where we work, whether we are prepared to endure a long commute, etc.

I'm sure there are people who can give a long list of horrible things about Surfers Paradise?!

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45 minutes ago, can1983 said:

I moved around the age of 40, I found it pretty easy to make friends and fit in. I'm in regional Australia (Hobart)

Not everyone makes their friends at school and keeps them forever and isn't open to meeting new people. I had a large group of uni friends that were my entire social life from 18 to 35. Now not a single one talks to another as far as i understand. Its not like we fell out with each other we just drifted away.

 

I've moved around a lot since I left school and never had any problem making new friends.  I only keep in touch with 2 old school friends.  Didn't go to university.  Kept in touch with close friends from my teen years - we shared a cottage for 3 years in the Lake District.  Apart from a couple of good friends from my working overseas years, the other friendships sort of tailed off and I just hear from them at Christmas.  

Now that we are retired in Tasmania ......... no problem with friends and a social life now especially as very good friends we have known for many years have made the move to Tassie from NSW where we also lived for a number of years.

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8 hours ago, Marisawright said:

You'll find Perth is a place you either love or hate, no middle ground.

I’ve spent 6 months there working and living along time ago and loved it but I know things will have changed a fair bit 

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10 hours ago, Marisawright said:

You'll find Perth is a place you either love or hate, no middle ground.

Are you sure it promotes such extreme reactions?. Perhaps  numbing to a point of acceptance is more the order of the day. ?

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3 hours ago, Blue Flu said:

Are you sure it promotes such extreme reactions?. Perhaps  numbing to a point of acceptance is more the order of the day. ?

It was good for a week, but that’s about the limit..

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