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Lucia

Still here and still feel the pull

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

No.  You'll have to find a GP that 'bulk bills", then you'll pay nothing for GP visits or tests.  You'll have to make sure to let your GP know that you want to be treated in the public system for everything, so he doesn't refer you to a private specialist.  Yes you will pay for medicines (it's $5.60 per item if you qualify for a Seniors health card, which you will).  

The fact is, the public health system in Australia is much the same as the NHS.  If you don't want to see a private specialist, you just have to wait for a public one and that might mean a long wait, but it's no worse than the wait you'd have in the UK.  Australians are so used to having private health insurance, they're horrified at the idea of waiting, but it's only because we're all used to paying up and it's made us a bit spoiled. 

My husband doesn't have private health insurance.  He has decided to pay for a couple of small procedures because he didn't want to wait, but he could have done the same in the UK.  My friend's dad doesn't have private health insurance (he's 85) and just relies on the public system.  He needed a spinal fusion and it didn't cost him a cent.

I don't know how benefits work if you're disabled or elderly and need support to live at home.  Maybe someone else can help with that.

Marisa we don’t qualify for a seniors health card apparently, so it’s not automatic. We pay the PBS rate until we meet the safety net, they then cost $6.80 until the end of the year. Would like be great if we were eligible for the seniors health card.

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And is a reverse mortgage to release equity from your house a common practice and safe?

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7 hours ago, Nanna said:

And is a reverse mortgage to release equity from your house a common practice and safe?

They exist but no, I wouldn't say they are common practice. I wouldn't say they are "safe".  Not because you'll get conned, but because most of them are not good value for money.  You have to give away a lot of your home in exchange for a fairly small amount of money. 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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8 hours ago, Nanna said:

Hi Ramot   why don't you qualify for that card?

It's means-tested, so it's probably because Ramot has too much income.  You are so worried about your financial situation, I'm assuming that won't be the case for you.

Here's the eligibility criteria. Notice that you have to be living in Australia for two years before you're eligible:

To qualify for the Commonwealth Seniors Health Card a person must:

  • have reached the qualifying age for Age Pension;
  • be an Australian citizen, a holder of a permanent visa, or a Special Category Visa holder and have been in Australia for a period of, or periods totalling 104 weeks;
  • reside in Australia;
  • not be receiving a social security pension or benefit;
  • meet the requirements of an annual income test.

A person is not required to undergo an assets test to qualify for the Commonwealth Seniors Health Card.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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11 hours ago, Nanna said:

Thank you for that.  

 

An example :  dialysis at home etc.  Not that we need anything but we are all getting older - does stuff like that have to be paid for if you have no health insurance? Any ideas? 

My husband is on dialysis and does home haemodialysis. All of the equipment, home alterations are provided and paid for by Medicare. However certain drugs included in the infusion (heparin, iron) are prescription items and the patient pays. If you do home dialysis then you get some financial support towards water and electricity bill but it does not cover full additional cost. If you go to a dialysis hub to dialyse then no additional costs. You save Medicare about $20k a year doing home dialysis but you have out of pocket costs and subsidise Medicare in order to have the convenience of not having to go to a dialysis unit at a set time for 4-5 hours 3 times a week and sit next to some random stranger….

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Thank you Loopylu.  So in each year what is the total cost to you?

 

I font think we will qualify for discount cards as our capital would still he in the bank and altho worryingly not enough to give us a great lifestyle itcwould probably be too much to qualify.

But does that also apply to eligibility for a PBS card?

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54 minutes ago, Nanna said:

I font think we will qualify for discount cards as our capital would still he in the bank and altho worryingly not enough to give us a great lifestyle itcwould probably be too much to qualify.

That's not correct.  The discount card is granted based on income, not on assets.  

Once the two years are up and you're in your own home, if you STILL can't qualify for a Seniors Health Card then you must have plenty of money and you've got nothing to worry about.  If you think otherwise, then you must be expecting to live an extravagant lifestyle.  

There's no such thing as a PBS card.  If you have a Medicare card (which you will, being a permanent resident) then you'll automatically get your medicines at the PBS rate (and eventually, when you get your Seniors card, at the seniors rate).  There is a thing called a PBS Safety Net which you can apply for once you've spent more than $1,400 on medicines in a year, then you can get the lower rate.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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42 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

That's not correct.  The discount card is granted based on income, not on assets.  

Once the two years are up and you're in your own home, if you STILL can't qualify for a Seniors Health Card then you must have plenty of money and you've got nothing to worry about.  If you think otherwise, then you must be expecting to live an extravagant lifestyle.  

There's no such thing as a PBS card.  If you have a Medicare card (which you will, being a permanent resident) then you'll automatically get your medicines at the PBS rate (and eventually, when you get your Seniors card, at the seniors rate).  There is a thing called a PBS Safety Net which you can apply for once you've spent more than $1,400 on medicines in a year, then you can get the lower rate.

,the safety net is combined amount of your prescriptions with your spouse, so if you both have what I call fairly ‘normal’ age health conditions, it’s very likely you will get your prescriptions at the $6.80 per script for part of the year.

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