Jump to content
simmo

Cost of Living.

Recommended Posts

This is a great article...this forum was filled with moonshine links from a certain stooge's propaganda posts that have amplified this destruction and hammered the cost of living.  I wonder if we'll get an apology?

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-63039558

Quote

Headed up by Jonathan Isaby, another former chief executive of the TaxPayers' Alliance, Brexit Central also ended up being based at 55 Tufton Street.

"So it became almost required reading for those who were on the pro-Brexit side of the argument," says Mr Jones. "Every day you'd check in at Brexit Central and see what they were reporting."

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, FirstWorldProblems said:

They’ve really painted themselves into a corner.  There’s no way to recover. 
 

This post-2016 Conservative Party is run by a UKIP & ERG core who hold an ideology that they were able to sell to the masses with fantastical promises and slogans of a great glory ahead.   The people up front and leading this current Conservative Party knew those were impossible promises (hence every one of them voting to remain in the worlds largest trading bloc that sits right in our doorstep) but pushed reality aside in pursuit of their personal, naked ambition. 
 

Since the great lie can never be acknowledged, each successive leader is caught in a position where they have to keep blaming everyone else for the problems, whilst simultaneously denying that there are actual problems whilst also peddling lie upon lie upon lie of how they have the magic beans that will solve it.  
 

You can’t solve it.  It’s a massive impact on our economy that is permeating into all public services and all of our lives. It will take generations to recover so for however long we have new leaders emerging who promise magic beans, we will chaos and failure. 
 

And I don’t see how it’s going to be different under Labour.  Starmer wants the votes of the minority (but significant minority) of people who still believe in the magic beans so he can’t acknowledge the actual problem either.  

The best plan for Brits who want to stay sane is to move to Australia 😀

 

Sounds about right. My British friends paint a bleak picture! It’ll be interesting to see how things are when I return in a few weeks. First trip back in 8 years…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, HappyHeart said:

Sounds about right. My British friends paint a bleak picture! It’ll be interesting to see how things are when I return in a few weeks. First trip back in 8 years…

If I were you I’d try to avoid it all. It’s depressing. Just enjoy your trip and focus on the fun stuff 👍

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, FirstWorldProblems said:

If I were you I’d try to avoid it all. It’s depressing. Just enjoy your trip and focus on the fun stuff 👍

For sure. That’s definitely the plan. My Dad is on borrowed time and that’s the focus of the trip. Making memories and catching up with old friends and family 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, HappyHeart said:

For sure. That’s definitely the plan. My Dad is on borrowed time and that’s the focus of the trip. Making memories and catching up with old friends and family 

Enjoy your trip, just don’t catch covid like me just as you arrive, I tested again this morning and it’s showing very positive still 6 days later, and I’m not feeling great yet, and now husband tested positive yesterday. Had to canx seeing everyone and it was the main catch up with family and friends week. 
Fingers crossed you have better luck. 
We are in Bristol and the weather is very mild so far16’ hope it stays like that for your trip xM

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, ramot said:

Enjoy your trip, just don’t catch covid like me just as you arrive, I tested again this morning and it’s showing very positive still 6 days later, and I’m not feeling great yet, and now husband tested positive yesterday. Had to canx seeing everyone and it was the main catch up with family and friends week. 
Fingers crossed you have better luck. 
We are in Bristol and the weather is very mild so far16’ hope it stays like that for your trip xM

I’ve had it once and was sick for 2 plus weeks so I hope not. We will be careful. Don’t want it to spoil the trip. I hope you have a great time for the renainder. Make the most of x 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

For sure. That’s definitely the plan. My Dad is on borrowed time and that’s the focus of the trip. Making memories and catching up with old friends and family 

Tough times.  I just got back from visiting my own father who has quite the battle ahead of him.  It's jarring isn't it to see a once big tough man become skinny and frail.  Circle of life I suppose.  I hope that your time with your dad on this trip is special and something you can look back on fondly.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

Sounds about right. My British friends paint a bleak picture! It’ll be interesting to see how things are when I return in a few weeks. First trip back in 8 years…

It doesn't need to be as bleak a picture as it is. This Govt are causing it and blaming outside factors.

To Hunt's credit, he's called it as it is and called out everything Truss has done in the last few weeks as the bollox it was.

I don't see how she can continue. They're looking at 100 seats at the next election unless they bin her. I hope they keep her but we need a GE early 2023.

Edited by s713
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, s713 said:

It doesn't need to be as bleak a picture as it is. This Govt are causing it and blaming outside factors.

To Hunt's credit, he's called it as it is and called out everything Truss has done in the last few weeks as the bollox it was.

I don't see how she can continue. They're looking at 100 seats at the next election unless they bin her. I hope they keep her but we need a GE early 2023.

I've heard Truss will be out by early November so they can prep her for "I'm a celebrity get me out of here" which starts back again in Australia late November.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An absolutely stunning article in The Times by Matthew Syed, the Government are in such a bind that they must accept defeat if their party has any chance of survival.  No improvement in cost of living until there is a proper reset and some base acceptance....if they cannot do that, they simply have to disappear.

The commentary pretty much summarises everything that happened on this forum since 2016, we saw it in real-time.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/5c1234a8-4cab-11ed-b4df-93f167fe6682?shareToken=ef5aec7a3caf790e7fbb83a35552cf70

In the autumn of 1954 a young and rather daring psychologist called Leon Festinger infiltrated a UFO cult in Minnesota. The cult insiders believed that they would be picked up in a spaceship at midnight on December 21 and transported to a new planetary utopia on the edge of the galaxy. They had sold their possessions and told the local newspaper what was about to unfold.

Festinger was not interested in the prophecy per se. Many such groups have risen up from time to time in different parts of America. Rather, he was fascinated in what would happen after the prophecy failed. Would the cult members admit their folly? Would they go back to their lives? Would they become reacquainted with reality?

In fact the 35-year-old Festinger, who had spent his career examining dogmatic thinking in all its forms, had a different expectation. He thought their convictions would become even more entrenched. It would be too psychologically threatening to admit they were wrong, too mortifying to confront the stares of those who had warned them. Sure enough, as the clock ticked past midnight, the cult members rapidly found an alternative explanation. The planetary timetable had shifted: the spaceship would now come two years later. Within a week they were back out on a recruitment drive.

I mention this research because it offers the only lens through which to make sense of what has unfolded over the past six years of British politics. Future historians will not be particularly surprised by the appointment of a fourth chancellor in less than a year, markets in meltdown and talk of a new leadership election weeks after the last one (with some bookmakers putting short odds on a Boris Johnson comeback). No, these will be seen as the logical consequence of what went before, a sequence of events stretching back to the defining prophecy of recent British political history.

For it is Brexit that sits behind all that has unfolded. It was the true believers who prophesied that the economy would grow ever faster when unshackled from the Teutonic chains of the EU; who divined that, reacquainted with the sovereignty looted by Brussels, we would be able to secure advantageous trade deals around the world; who foretold that we would be able to cut immigration to a fraction of its previous size while turbocharging productivity and growth.

 

Each of those predictions was flatly disputed by those who voted against this historic error, but we were told we simply didn’t believe fervently enough, or that we were talking Britain down. The language became ever more cultish as each prediction collided with reality and was found wanting. Backbenchers jeered in the Commons when reference was made to estimates that the economy had shrunk by 5.3 per cent; hooted when they saw that investment had plummeted by 13.7 per cent; howled with derision at damaging declines in exports. The more our economy suffered, the more our credibility was eroded, the more they cleaved to the cake-and-eat-it fantasies that got us here.

At times the confabulation has reached proportions that might have surprised even Festinger. Surveying the carnage on the gilt markets after the ill-conceived mini-budget, Daniel Hannan detected an all-pervading fear of a Keir Starmer government. The most ardent Brexiteer columnist for the Telegraph glimpsed a remainer cabal working to scupper a heroic Tory administration. In an interview with Mishal Husain on the Today programme Jacob Rees-Mogg felt moved to question the impartiality of the BBC. He regarded it as a betrayal that Husain had linked the rise in gilt yields to the mini-budget, even though one directly followed the other. Somewhere in that subtle but shallow mind an alternative reality was unfolding.

Historians will perhaps point out that we have seen mass sociogenic delusions in the past. Ancient Rome was so attached to the idea that it was protected by divine providence that, instead of dealing with the various crises of antiquity, it debased the currency: the denarius was adulterated from 98 per cent silver in AD63 to 0 per cent by AD270, leading to mass inflation. Similar patterns can be seen in the demise of the Mayans, Persians and Mamluks. Some might say that the vote for Brexit was a similar spasm of historical denial, a once great power struggling to deal with a more niche role in world affairs.

But that is why the idea that the Tories can ditch Truss now and restore confidence in time to win the next election stretches credibility. To remind ourselves, this is a government that ferociously criticises the last one, and if it moves on to its third prime minister this year, the new administration will surely turn just as savagely on the present incumbents. That, by the way, is another pattern Festinger found in cults: true believers have the tendency to fragment into competing subgroups as cognitive dissonance escalates.

In this context the People’s Front of Judaea is now represented by Rishi Sunak and the Judaean People’s Front by Penny Mordaunt — although who knows how many more splits will be in place by tomorrow. All the contenders now busying themselves for a run at the top job are true believers: people who defended breaches of the rule of law and other acts of Brexit-inspired vandalism. In many ways this reveals the truth that Brexit itself, however tarnished, is now the sacred shibboleth of the party — not economic competence, not Thatcherism, not even Burkean traditionalism. Everything is expendable in defence of the central dogma.

That is why we need not a change of leader but of government. This is not merely in the interests of the nation but of the Tory party itself. Festinger found the only reliable way for people to break free from the bonds of a cult was to take a break; preferably to go on a long holiday. Away from the echo chamber, freed from the exhausting demands of self-justifying confabulation, people are able to heal. A period in opposition would be a convalescence, an opportunity for the Tories not merely to change the leadership rules that grant so much power to members whose ranks have been swelled by entryism from Ukip, but to reset.

The backbencher Charles Walker gave a wonderful interview to Times Radio a couple of weeks ago. “We are a patriotic party,” he said. “Our first duty is not to get re-elected; our first duty is to the country.” I almost felt like hugging him as I heard those words, for it hinted at the Tory party that so many of us once admired. A party of pragmatism, of moderation, of realism. We need that party back for the health of our democracy. So, please, call an election, take a break and find yourselves again. Do so now, and you’ll be back. Cling on to the bitter end, changing leaders, jumping through hoops, gazing at navels, and you may never be forgiven.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 17/10/2022 at 03:17, FirstWorldProblems said:

Tough times.  I just got back from visiting my own father who has quite the battle ahead of him.  It's jarring isn't it to see a once big tough man become skinny and frail.  Circle of life I suppose.  I hope that your time with your dad on this trip is special and something you can look back on fondly.

That's reminded me of the Gerard Manley Hopkins poem 'Felix Randal', which expresses that quite movingly.

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44394/felix-randal

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, GrandpaGrumble said:

That's reminded me of the Gerard Manley Hopkins poem 'Felix Randal', which expresses that quite movingly.

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44394/felix-randal

I’ve never read this before. It’s moving. Thank you for sharing. 

  • Like 1

British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, s713 said:

This Government 😂

It’s so far beyond embarrassing now. And I don’t mean for the government, I mean for the people who live here!  We are all humiliated on the world stage. A laughing stock. 
 

I cannot fathom why her party members chose her of all people. Do they hate this country and want to destroy it totally?  Genuinely - they saw her performances and they heard her bonkers policies and they voted for her anyway.  

Edited by FirstWorldProblems
  • Like 1

British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Robert Dyson said:

Wow.

 

 

WOW indeed.  Saying the quiet part out loud.   When do they start crossing the floor?


British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, FirstWorldProblems said:

WOW indeed.  Saying the quiet part out loud.   When do they start crossing the floor?

they dont need to...letters will go in tonight and she'll be gone by the morning.   I have to say i have lost a bet, i thought she'd be gone yesterday morning.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Robert Dyson said:

they dont need to...letters will go in tonight and she'll be gone by the morning.   I have to say i have lost a bet, i thought she'd be gone yesterday morning.

I think you might have assumed more integrity on her part than she actually possesses.  In fact besides enormous ambition I don’t know what else she does possess.


British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Robert Dyson said:

this is a really interesting watch from the Financial Times.

 

 

I saw that. It really is.  I also notice that The Times is the latest right wing propagandist rag with an article today about Brexit. being a failure.  
 

They write as if they aren’t one of those to blame!  

B6EA0609-1EEB-4197-A0B0-AB7ADD56A689.jpeg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 16/10/2022 at 18:31, HappyHeart said:

Sounds about right. My British friends paint a bleak picture! It’ll be interesting to see how things are when I return in a few weeks. First trip back in 8 years…

Things are bad but largely self-induced. But no matter it would not be the ideal time to return. It'll most likely just magnify  (Wrongly in many respects) that we are so much better, when the fact is we have very serious problems on all sorts of fronts. Different ways the media report just aggravate this conclusion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FirstWorldProblems said:

I think you might have assumed more integrity on her part than she actually possesses.  In fact besides enormous ambition I don’t know what else she does possess.

Begs the question, whatever did those Tory members see their way into voting this woman into the top position? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Robert Dyson said:

they dont need to...letters will go in tonight and she'll be gone by the morning.   I have to say i have lost a bet, i thought she'd be gone yesterday morning.

I think they don't see a way forward that will ease her departure. Party in disarray from what I can see, hence hard to find a suitable replacement that will be agreed by all sides.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Robert Dyson said:

this is a really interesting watch from the Financial Times.

 

 

Abject stupidity.  Like lemmings over a cliff 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×