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Maybel family

Visa advice

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Hi all,

We would really appreciate some advice if possible. My partner (33) and I (34) are assessing our options in moving to Australia. 
 

A bit about ourselves:

1.My partner is currently a primary school teacher and has been for 9 years post qualification. She has 4 years of uni under her belt including a PGDip.

2. Myself, I worked for the Home Office for the past 7 years but have recently taken up a new role with HMRC as a tax investigator.  I also have 4 years of uni including a PGDip.

We have two children (6 and 8 months) and as a family we are fit and well and have no medical issues. I have two first cousins who currently live in Australia (one of which has PR) and my partner has one cousin who is a citizen. 
 

Do you think we have a plausible chance in being accepted for a visa to work and live there? We have decided we are not overly fussy with where we would be placed as ultimately, we just want a better life and if  we get granted PR further down the line, we could always move then.

Any advice and info would be greatly appreciated. We are in the process of filling out forms to liaise with an agent, but just wary they just want money for a consultation. 
 

Many thanks again,

Maybel Family.

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Did She do a PGCE after her first degree? PGDIP not so common over here so was it after a 3 year education degree to improve teacher status or was it the teaching training year? I know UK has some on the job learning options for  QT status and they don't count for qualifications here. There is also the issue that, for a visa, primary teachers often require an additional skill like a second language and not all states offer visas for them at all and you'd need very high points to get an invitation these days. Once you get here, there's the catch 22 that teaching jobs are hard to come by in the places that people actually want to live in and plum positions are usually given to people who've  done the hard yards in rural and remote first. 

Edited to say, the relations who live here are essentially irrelevant  and if you hoped to continue with your role as HMRC investigator you would struggle to get a job with ATO (the equivalent) in the first instance as federal PS jobs require Australian citizenship generally.

Intrigued by what you think the "better life" might be. It's just another first world country with all that entails, it's not magically better or worse than any other first world country though I can see that if you were hoping to move from somewhere in the third world it would probably be "better".

Edited by Quoll

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Make sure your agent is MARA registered.  Unfortunately there are a few shonks out there, including a couple of very large firms that spend a fortune on advertising and look very legit. 

Suncoast Migration, Go Matilda, Andre Burger are all good agents. 

Your main problem, as Quoll says, is that you won't be able to get an equivalent government role because they employ only citizens, so you will have to forge some kind of new career for several years before you stand any chance of getting into a government role.  So you're likely to be starting from scratch in Australia, and it may be hard to have "a better life" if your income is going to be cut. And actually, if you are hoping to come on a temporary visa based on your wife's occupation, you'll struggle to get work at all - employers are wary of hiring someone who's reliant on someone else's temp visa.  So I would not consider coming to Australia unless you can get a permanent visa right upfront.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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2 hours ago, Quoll said:

Did She do a PGCE after her first degree? PGDIP not so common over here so was it after a 3 year education degree to improve teacher status or was it the teaching training year? I know UK has some on the job learning options for  QT status and they don't count for qualifications here. There is also the issue that, for a visa, primary teachers often require an additional skill like a second language and not all states offer visas for them at all and you'd need very high points to get an invitation these days. Once you get here, there's the catch 22 that teaching jobs are hard to come by in the places that people actually want to live in and plum positions are usually given to people who've  done the hard yards in rural and remote first. 

Edited to say, the relations who live here are essentially irrelevant  and if you hoped to continue with your role as HMRC investigator you would struggle to get a job with ATO (the equivalent) in the first instance as federal PS jobs require Australian citizenship generally.

Intrigued by what you think the "better life" might be. It's just another first world country with all that entails, it's not magically better or worse than any other first world country though I can see that if you were hoping to move from somewhere in the third world it would probably be "better".

Thanks for the reply. So my partner did a 3 year degree in business followed by a PGCE but it’s at a masters level so it’s post graduate.

Yeah, we have done a bit of research regarding the competition for teacher places and it does seem very competitive. My partner is also open to doing another role if it came to it. What other options do you think could be open for her with her experience? I’m also aware that being a civil servant for over 10 years translates to nothing in Australia. Although there are potential jobs that I can get on behalf of the Home Office/HMRC is Australia, due to the location, competition again is high. Again, I’m open to doing something different if needs be.

When I say better, I mean our family life experiences would personally be considered better I.e more for kids in terms of outside activities, better work life balance, weather, plethora of different experiences the list goes on.  

 

 

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51 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Make sure your agent is MARA registered.  Unfortunately there are a few shonks out there, including a couple of very large firms that spend a fortune on advertising and look very legit. 

Suncoast Migration, Go Matilda, Andre Burger are all good agents. 

Your main problem, as Quoll says, is that you won't be able to get an equivalent government role because they employ only citizens, so you will have to forge some kind of new career for several years before you stand any chance of getting into a government role.  So you're likely to be starting from scratch in Australia, and it may be hard to have "a better life" if your income is going to be cut. And actually, if you are hoping to come on a temporary visa based on your wife's occupation, you'll struggle to get work at all - employers are wary of hiring someone who's reliant on someone else's temp visa.  So I would not consider coming to Australia unless you can get a permanent visa right upfront.

Thanks for the advice, much appreciated. Yeah, we always knew my job would not directly translate. If needs be, we could rent out our house here. We also have investments and substantial savings. Granted, we don’t want to burn through money unnecessarily, but we are willing to live below our means so that in the long term we could potentially forge a new life. 

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8 hours ago, Maybel family said:

We are in the process of filling out forms to liaise with an agent, but just wary they just want money for a consultation. 

This comes up a lot here … but why would you be wary about paying a professional for professional advice? What may seem like a ‘quick chat’ to you requires 4+years of study, ongoing professional development, professional licensing, access to a library of legislation and policy, as well as all the other associated costs of running a business. 
 

I assume you pay your dentist for a checkup,  not just when they decide you need a filling? I think the same principle applies here. A professional opinion that you have no migration options is as valid (and probably more time consuming to produce) than one which identifies a pathway. Moving halfway across the world is a decision that affects the rest of your and your families’ lives for ever … a couple of hundred dollars/pounds/euros for a consultation to get it right really isn’t material in this context. 

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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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12 minutes ago, paulhand said:

This comes up a lot here … but why would you be wary about paying a professional for professional advice? What may seem like a ‘quick chat’ to you requires 4+years of study, ongoing professional development, professional licensing, access to a library of legislation and policy, as well as all the other associated costs of running a business. 
 

I assume you pay your dentist for a checkup,  not just when they decide you need a filling? I think the same principle applies here. A professional opinion that you have no migration options is as valid (and probably more time consuming to produce) than one which identifies a pathway. Moving halfway across the world is a decision that affects the rest of your and your families’ lives for ever … a couple of hundred dollars/pounds/euros for a consultation to get it right really isn’t material in this context. 

I didn’t say I wouldn’t, I said I am wary as I’m not sure of the reputable agents. In stating that in a forum where people are here to offer advice, they have given me reputable agents. Whether you think it shouldn’t be a concern means nothing to me. You should always do research and seek other opinions in the matter, including agents without being duped. Secondly, for 7 years I also worked in immigration and whether you agree or not, there are fake agents about. Something that has probably been alluded to many times in this forum. So I suggest you chill with the judgemental response and try and be more helpful than subjective on a matter that is sensitive to those actively looking to migrate…

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57 minutes ago, Maybel family said:

Thanks for the reply. So my partner did a 3 year degree in business followed by a PGCE but it’s at a masters level so it’s post graduate.

Yeah, we have done a bit of research regarding the competition for teacher places and it does seem very competitive. My partner is also open to doing another role if it came to it. What other options do you think could be open for her with her experience? I’m also aware that being a civil servant for over 10 years translates to nothing in Australia. Although there are potential jobs that I can get on behalf of the Home Office/HMRC is Australia, due to the location, competition again is high. Again, I’m open to doing something different if needs be.

When I say better, I mean our family life experiences would personally be considered better I.e more for kids in terms of outside activities, better work life balance, weather, plethora of different experiences the list goes on.  

 

 

Still not sure about the PGDip - was it a full year in a uni with the requisite number of prac teaching days? 

She could apply for anything if she got a visa, whatever floated her boat really - could be adult ed, retail sales or local government - whatever she can sell herself as.

Wouldnt bank on the work/life balance thing - Aussies have fewer holidays and work longer weeks than UK and if you have career aspirations then it can be cutthroat. 

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3 minutes ago, Quoll said:

Still not sure about the PGDip - was it a full year in a uni with the requisite number of prac teaching days? 

She could apply for anything if she got a visa, whatever floated her boat really - could be adult ed, retail sales or local government - whatever she can sell herself as.

Wouldnt bank on the work/life balance thing - Aussies have fewer holidays and work longer weeks than UK and if you have career aspirations then it can be cutthroat. 

Thanks again for the reply. Yeah it was a full year. My partners checked a few sources that indicate her level of education is more than enough but again, it would have to be professionally verified.

Work life balance is a subjective matter as well as working long weeks. It all depends on what type of job you do, where you live etc. Something we would need to look into in further detail. 

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1 hour ago, Maybel family said:

Work life balance is a subjective matter as well as working long weeks. It all depends on what type of job you do, where you live etc. Something we would need to look into in further detail. 

Very true.  One of the things my (ex-)husband found very hard, was the amount of hours he was expected to work in the private school system.  Far more than he'd ever worked in the Scottish state system.  However we couldn't deal with the lack of control he had in the Victorian state system, where he just had to go where he was sent, meaning my career suffered.  So he had to go into the private system. He is now in adult education which he's not that keen on, but his new partner is Australian and won't contemplate moving to the UK.  

I would say if you want work/life balance, avoid Sydney, where there's a culture of long hours and pressure not to take holidays, plus you'll face a long commute unless you are very rich.  Ultimately Canberra will be the best place if you are hoping to get back into government work eventually:  a lot of Australians knock it because it used to be a very boring, faceless place, but it has changed a lot.  Far inland of course, so no beachside lifestyle! 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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3 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Very true.  One of the things my (ex-)husband found very hard, was the amount of hours he was expected to work in the private school system.  Far more than he'd ever worked in the Scottish state system.  However we couldn't deal with the lack of control he had in the Victorian state system, where he just had to go where he was sent, meaning my career suffered.  So he had to go into the private system. He is now in adult education which he's not that keen on, but his new partner is Australian and won't contemplate moving to the UK.  

I would say if you want work/life balance, avoid Sydney, where there's a culture of long hours and pressure not to take holidays, plus you'll face a long commute unless you are very rich.  Ultimately Canberra will be the best place if you are hoping to get back into government work eventually:  a lot of Australians knock it because it used to be a very boring, faceless place, but it has changed a lot.  Far inland of course, so no beachside lifestyle! 

I agree, it all depends where you go. We are quite open to anything really as long as the neighbourhood is nice. Sometimes you need short term sacrifices for long term gains and we could eventually move down the line if we wanted to. Sydney /Melbourne doesn’t really appeal to us if the hustle and bustle is equivalent to London. It’s never been our thing. 

To be honest, my partner works ridiculously long hours anyways - 8.30 start with hardly breaks in between, leave at 16.30.  Followed by marking and planning when the kids are sorted and then working on the weekend too. It’s quite a lot. I used to work really unsociable, long hours for the Home Office which is why I changed recently.
 


 

 

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2 hours ago, Maybel family said:

I didn’t say I wouldn’t, I said I am wary as I’m not sure of the reputable agents. In stating that in a forum where people are here to offer advice, they have given me reputable agents. Whether you think it shouldn’t be a concern means nothing to me. You should always do research and seek other opinions in the matter, including agents without being duped. Secondly, for 7 years I also worked in immigration and whether you agree or not, there are fake agents about. Something that has probably been alluded to many times in this forum. So I suggest you chill with the judgemental response and try and be more helpful than subjective on a matter that is sensitive to those actively looking to migrate…

Have you any idea just how helpful this particular agent has been over the years to people using this forum?!

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1 minute ago, Nemesis said:

Have you any idea just how helpful this particular agent has been over the years to people using this forum?!

What is your point? Did he introduce himself? No. Was he helpful and suggest he was an agent, could give guidance etc and state he has a reputable backing? No.

I didn’t appreciate him making assumptions. I suggest you read my initial post and response again.

 

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2 hours ago, Maybel family said:

I didn’t say I wouldn’t, I said I am wary as I’m not sure of the reputable agents. In stating that in a forum where people are here to offer advice, they have given me reputable agents. Whether you think it shouldn’t be a concern means nothing to me. You should always do research and seek other opinions in the matter, including agents without being duped. Secondly, for 7 years I also worked in immigration and whether you agree or not, there are fake agents about. Something that has probably been alluded to many times in this forum. So I suggest you chill with the judgemental response and try and be more helpful than subjective on a matter that is sensitive to those actively looking to migrate…

Please do remember that however well intended, our forum is made up of people who aren't qualified to give migration advice but rather their opinion and own experiences.  The rules of migration change so rapidly.  ETA  All the agents who contribute on the forum have to state they're an agent in their signature with their MARA number.  Paul (one of the reputable agents mentioned in a previous post), who responded to you has this clearly displayed.

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3 minutes ago, ali said:

Please do remember that however well intended, our forum is made up of people who aren't qualified to give migration advice but rather their opinion and own experiences.  The rules of migration change so rapidly.  

For sure, I mean this system is much more complex than the English system, especially with all the sub regions here with different criteria. We already submitted visa assessments prior to posting on here. We recieved one reply and waiting on others. But yeah, it’s just nice to get opinions of others who have been through the system and to see if we have missed anything out etc.  

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3 hours ago, Maybel family said:

So I suggest you chill with the judgemental response and try and be more helpful than subjective on a matter that is sensitive to those actively looking to migrate…

OK ... I wish you good luck with your application.

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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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3 minutes ago, starlight7 said:

8.30- 4.30 pm would be a short day here. Just saying. 

The day doesn’t stop there as insinuated in the post…

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1 hour ago, Nemesis said:

Have you any idea just how helpful this particular agent has been over the years to people using this forum?!

I was just thinking the same.  The OP has touched a nerve with many on this site with their comments to Paul as he is super helpful on this site and very much appreciated by many.  I expect their hope for help will quickly dry up now. 

Edited by Tulip1

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Hope for help? You make it sound like this site is the only resort in getting a visa… touch a nerve with many? You and one other?  I was hoping for an intellectual discussion but people are posting without reading and making assumptions. Don’t get what people get out of sitting at home replying to something when they are not offering any help at all. If it’s not constructive why say it in the first place….

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23 minutes ago, Maybel family said:

Hope for help? You make it sound like this site is the only resort in getting a visa… touch a nerve with many? You and one other?  I was hoping for an intellectual discussion but people are posting without reading and making assumptions. Don’t get what people get out of sitting at home replying to something when they are not offering any help at all. If it’s not constructive why say it in the first place….

Plus one, perhaps unwittingly you have touched a nerve. Most posters reply with with the intention to help, sometimes it’s not what the OP wants to hear or replies can be misinterpreted. Hundreds and probably thousands of posters have received help over the years I have been a member, but unless the poster replying has details in their signature that they are registered immigration agents, then the rest who reply are only trying to help, to the best of their knowledge.

Good luck with your application when you apply.

Edited by ramot

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2 hours ago, Maybel family said:

To be honest, my partner works ridiculously long hours anyways - 8.30 start with hardly breaks in between, leave at 16.30.  Followed by marking and planning when the kids are sorted and then working on the weekend too. 

That sounds like a normal teacher's load, in Scotland at least.  People have no idea of the hours teachers work, do they?  The problem with private schools in Australia is that they expect all teachers, not just PE teachers, to supervise sport on the weekends.  So my husband had to spend most of his Saturday supervising boys at sport (which he's actually no good at himself!), which meant he had to spend Sunday marking and planning and so he never got a day off until the holidays.   

If you don't like hustle and bustle then you're wise to avoid Sydney or Melbourne.  They are not as big as London but they are much bigger than every other city in the UK, and they are very spread out so commuting times are London-worthy.  Also houses in Sydney are double the price of almost everywhere else in the country.  As a teacher, your wife has the advantage of being able to work anywhere so I would recommend avoiding ALL the  capital cities, and looking at smaller regional centres like Newcastle in NSW, the Sunshine Coast in Queensland or even some of the coastal towns on the East Coast.   The difficulty will be working out what you would do in those smaller centres as you'd have to look at a total career change.   

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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1 minute ago, Marisawright said:

That sounds like a normal teacher's load, in Scotland at least.  People have no idea of the hours teachers work, do they?  The problem with private schools in Australia is that they expect all teachers, not just PE teachers, to supervise sport on the weekends.  So my husband had to spend most of his Saturday supervising boys at sport, which meant he had to spend Sunday marking and planning and so he never got a day off until the holidays. 

That does seem crazy to be fair. Not sure we’ve even read that anywhere. Do you think that’s solely because it was private then?  Yes, I agree, I’d say teachers work longer than most professions and believe the hours would be a shock to most. Are the holidays pretty much the same length for teachers I.e like 6 weeks etc?

Thanks for your information. Much appreciated!

 

 

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Just now, Maybel family said:

That does seem crazy to be fair. Not sure we’ve even read that anywhere. Do you think that’s solely because it was private then?  Yes, I agree, I’d say teachers work longer than most professions and believe the hours would be a shock to most. Are the holidays pretty much the same length for teachers I.e like 6 weeks etc?

School holidays are pretty much the same length.  The Saturday sport thing is a private school thing.  The thing is, working in the state system is frustrating for teachers, for lots of reasons.  Probably the same in most countries!   So jobs in private schools are sought after and then, to be honest, I think the schools take advantage of the teachers.   There's a lot more private schools in Australia as they get some government funding, and they're not just the preserve of the very rich.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, due out August 2022

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