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Kristie

Secondary teacher 189 visa

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1 hour ago, Kristie said:

Just at the moment? Or ever?

Never say never, but WA seem to do this with a lot of occupations that other states will happily take overseas qualifications for.

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2 hours ago, paulhand said:

WA are not interested in secondary school teachers, even from onshore, unless you have a WA degree or other qualification. 

So In summary - am I best waiting to see whether secondary teachers start to get invited to apply for 189/190 when Covid eases? Should I take skills assessment/English test or would it be a waste of time and money?

Is 85 points not enough points at all? Should I give up?

I am willing to work rurally, What is my best option?

I have talked to a few agents and they tell me that I can apply straight away but want to take my money prior.

Just feel like I am being told different things 😞 

helppp

 

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27 minutes ago, Kristie said:

So In summary - am I best waiting to see whether secondary teachers start to get invited to apply for 189/190 when Covid eases? Should I take skills assessment/English test or would it be a waste of time and money?

The situation is ever changing so you wont know unless you try. If you have a skills assessment and English done, you will be ready to move quickly if things change to your favour in the future. 

Understand that the situation is ever changing due to COVID and the Australian Visa system is very competitive. 

27 minutes ago, Kristie said:

I am willing to work rurally, What is my best option?

There is no easy answer. It may be worth while doing your skills assessment and English

Having a professional assessment by an Agent in the new year, by which time the changes to the Migration program may be known, would also be worthwhile.

27 minutes ago, Kristie said:

I have talked to a few agents and they tell me that I can apply straight away but want to take my money prior.

 All you can apply for straight away is a skills assessment followed by an Expression of Interest, as all the point tested visas (189,190 491) require an invitation.

You should be wary of anyone who tells you you "qualify" and ask for money for all stages upfront, including a visa application which may never come.  

Edited by Raul Senise
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Raul T Senise

Registered Migration Agent

MARN 0636699

www.ozimmigration.com

"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."

 

 

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22 minutes ago, Kristie said:

So In summary - am I best waiting to see whether secondary teachers start to get invited to apply for 189/190 when Covid eases? Should I take skills assessment/English test or would it be a waste of time and money?

Is 85 points not enough points at all? Should I give up?

I am willing to work rurally, What is my best option?

I have talked to a few agents and they tell me that I can apply straight away but want to take my money prior.

Just feel like I am being told different things 😞 

helppp

 

Forget the 189. It would be worth applying now for a 190 if you can find a state that’s accepting them, so you get in the queue 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Qld expect teachers to agree to be deployed anywhere, at the exigencies of the department, or at least they did when I told them to shove their offer into the lower part  of their large intestine.

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Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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4 hours ago, wrussell said:

Qld expect teachers to agree to be deployed anywhere, at the exigencies of the department,

Victoria was like that when we migrated.   My hushand (now ex-) is a science teacher who had taught mainly 5th and 6th form Physics in the UK, and we understood those skills were desperately needed, so we assumed he'd end up in a big school in a reasonably large town.  

We ended up in Warracknabeal, a town of 2,000 people.  He had a few HSC students but he was mainly teaching Junior Science and also had to teach Geography (even though he failed Geography himself at school and never did it again!), "Life Skills" and cover for anything else if someone was sick.   When he enquired, he found out that all teachers have to serve 2 years in a country school.   Meanwhile there were schools in Ballarat and Melbourne with HSC Physics students with no properly-qualified teacher to teach them.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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6 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Victoria was like that when we migrated.   My hushand (now ex-) is a science teacher who had taught mainly 5th and 6th form Physics in the UK, and we understood those skills were desperately needed, so we assumed he'd end up in a big school in a reasonably large town.  

We ended up in Warracknabeal, a town of 2,000 people.  He had a few HSC students but he was mainly teaching Junior Science and also had to teach Geography (even though he failed Geography himself at school and never did it again!), "Life Skills" and cover for anything else if someone was sick.   When he enquired, he found out that all teachers have to serve 2 years in a country school.   Meanwhile there were schools in Ballarat and Melbourne with HSC Physics students with no properly-qualified teacher to teach them.  

That’s absolutely crazy!!

Yes, I’ve read lots about there being supply teachers being used long term and non specialists teaching in secondary school - this seems so strange!
 

Surely specialist teachers should be teaching their own subjects!

How did your ex find the experience?

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12 hours ago, wrussell said:

Qld expect teachers to agree to be deployed anywhere, at the exigencies of the department, or at least they did when I told them to shove their offer into the lower part  of their large intestine.

This is strange, why?

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I’m assuming all the posters here are talking about government schools.  I was sponsored by a private school in Victoria but my subject was French which was always a difficult one to fill….and this was in 2006.

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14 minutes ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

I’m assuming all the posters here are talking about government schools.  I was sponsored by a private school in Victoria but my subject was French which was always a difficult one to fill….and this was in 2006.

We’re you already in Australia when you were sponsored? 

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16 minutes ago, Kristie said:

We’re you already in Australia when you were sponsored? 

I wouldn't put too much significance on this answer as things were very different in immigration in 2006 than they are today.

Back then you could migrate until age 50 and 65 points was generally enough and the 189 style visa was the main award and sponsorship by state (190, 491) was less prevalent

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Something to consider. To be a teacher I. Australia I think you need to have studied a degree for 4 years. In the UK it’s typically 3 years. In the past a few people have become stuck with this. I haven’t seen anything to suggest the OP has done 4 years at Uni?
 

Happy for someone to correct me. 

Edited by JetBlast

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6 minutes ago, JetBlast said:

Something to consider. To be a teacher I. Australia I think you need to have studied a degree for 4 years. In the UK it’s typically 3 years. In the past a few people have become stuck with this. I haven’t seen anything to suggest the OP has done 4 years at Uni?
 

Happy for someone to correct me. 

This is a good point, but 3 year undergraduate degrees aren't UK wide and are typically in England (and possibly wales) but not in Scotland. 


:evilface_frowning_s

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37 minutes ago, JetBlast said:

Something to consider. To be a teacher I. Australia I think you need to have studied a degree for 4 years. In the UK it’s typically 3 years. In the past a few people have become stuck with this. I haven’t seen anything to suggest the OP has done 4 years at Uni?
 

Happy for someone to correct me. 

She said she had a degree plus PGCE which would be appropriate.

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2 hours ago, Kristie said:

We’re you already in Australia when you were sponsored? 

No, I sent my CV to private schools all over Australia ( but not in the major cities) and received a couple of offers.  I had a phone interview in April and the school did the rest.  We migrated in the September….and I was in my mid 50s!  As Ausvisitor said though things have probably changed but it is still true that you need 4 years of training to teach full time in Victoria.  My husband was  a PE teacher and had done the 3 year course in England so was restricted to CRT work.

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1 hour ago, JetBlast said:

Something to consider. To be a teacher I. Australia I think you need to have studied a degree for 4 years. In the UK it’s typically 3 years. In the past a few people have become stuck with this. I haven’t seen anything to suggest the OP has done 4 years at Uni?
 

Happy for someone to correct me. 

I have a 3 year degree in my subject and 1 year  PGCE

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10 hours ago, Kristie said:

That’s absolutely crazy!!

Yes, I’ve read lots about there being supply teachers being used long term and non specialists teaching in secondary school - this seems so strange!
 

Surely specialist teachers should be teaching their own subjects!

How did your ex find the experience?

It was crazy.   He hated it.  We came from Scotland, where the school system is (or was) very strict about qualifications - you can't teach a subject there if you're not qualified in it.  

We made enquiries and discovered that even once he'd "served" the two years in the country, it would be a lottery whether he'd get a Physics job, because the department made all the decisions and tended to favour seniority over qualifications.   So he started looking for a job in a private school and found one in Sydney.  To be honest, he hated that too, even though he was teaching Physics - it was a snobby boys' school full of entitled twats.   Eventually he found a job teaching international students. 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

It was crazy.   He hated it.  We came from Scotland, where the school system is (or was) very strict about qualifications - you can't teach a subject there if you're not qualified in it.  

We made enquiries and discovered that even once he'd "served" the two years in the country, it would be a lottery whether he'd get a Physics job, because the department made all the decisions and tended to favour seniority over qualifications.   So he started looking for a job in a private school and found one in Sydney.  To be honest, he hated that too, even though he was teaching Physics - it was a snobby boys' school full of entitled twats.   Eventually he found a job teaching international students. 

Oh , that doesn’t sound good! Haha! 

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

it was a snobby boys' school full of entitled twats

Little worse than a bunch of stuck up kids.  

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19 minutes ago, Kristie said:

Oh , that doesn’t sound good! Haha! 

On the whole, he felt the education system in Australia isn't as good as the UK.  I do notice when we have members going back to live in the UK, their kids usually have some catching up to do in academic subjects. In case you're not aware, in most states, secondary school just goes from Year 7 to Year 12, there's no separate college for years 11/12.  

Of course, how good/bad the system is for students doesn't necessarily tell you how good/bad it is for teachers.  I know Victoria has changed how it deploys teachers since then, so it would be a whole different story if you came to the state today. Worth checking what you'd be in for if you go to Queensland, though.  If you have to go remote in that state, it would be really remote!


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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28 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

On the whole, he felt the education system in Australia isn't as good as the UK.  I do notice when we have members going back to live in the UK, their kids usually have some catching up to do in academic subjects. In case you're not aware, in most states, secondary school just goes from Year 7 to Year 12, there's no separate college for years 11/12.  

Of course, how good/bad the system is for students doesn't necessarily tell you how good/bad it is for teachers.  I know Victoria has changed how it deploys teachers since then, so it would be a whole different story if you came to the state today. Worth checking what you'd be in for if you go to Queensland, though.  If you have to go remote in that state, it would be really remote!

I teach A-level already so that’s a bonus!!

Yea I don’t mind for a while, wouldn’t want it to be forever but I like the calm of being remote! We live in the countryside and I want to be further out!!

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57 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

Little worse than a bunch of stuck up kids.  

Kids are kids!! 

 

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Qld expect teachers to agree to be deployed anywhere, at the exigencies of the department, or at least they did when I told them to shove their offer into the lower part  of their large intestine.


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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2 hours ago, Kristie said:

I teach A-level already so that’s a bonus!!

The HSC is not quite to the same standard as A levels.   It's similar to the Scottish Highers.  As I said, if you're in the country, it's very likely you won't be teaching many students at A level, unless you are in a private boarding school.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 01/12/2021 at 20:17, Raul Senise said:

Since July this year the Department has invited a total of 450 people to apply for a 189 visa. The chance of receiving an invite is very low unless you have high points and an occupation on the Priority List.

A 190 visa will depend on the individual State requirements, with many States only inviting people already living in there.

Things may change due to increasing skills shortages and easing border restrictions. 

Only time will tell. 

 

How about a family sponsored visa? I would i be eligible for one if I had family living in Australia? 

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