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The end of the ‘fry-up’

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Yes they seem to have more or less gone. I don’t think I would order one these days though an egg and bacon roll goes down well from time to time.

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It’s not something I do often but I love a nice fry up although would more likely just have poached eggs on toast with bacon and mushrooms rather than tons of grease.   Who remembers going to British Home Stores and having a magnificent 8 breakfast.  You could chose 8 things from a long row of breakfast bits.  It was the best part of going shopping all those years ago. 

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There are fry ups everywhere here, but the concept is changing with gentrification....the idea of having to book a table days in advance to get a Sunday breakfast is alien to me, might as well do the whole lot on a barbecue sheet and sit in your own sunny garden.   Bacon, eggs, mushroom is highly nutritious. Add on fried haloumi and avocado and cut the bread out, you can't do better for a breakfast.

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Jay Rayner believes the decline is the result more of social change than food fashion. “The indicator was that these places usually had funny opening hours – 6am to 3pm, typically – and the reason was that they were all about providing highly calorific food to people who needed it as they were working physically very hard in manual jobs. And the reality is that there are far fewer people in these jobs now.”

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

It’s not something I do often but I love a nice fry up although would more likely just have poached eggs on toast with bacon and mushrooms rather than tons of grease.   Who remembers going to British Home Stores and having a magnificent 8 breakfast.  You could chose 8 things from a long row of breakfast bits.  It was the best part of going shopping all those years ago. 

Bringing back memories there T . BHS always a good feed ! 

Edited by Rallyman
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A joy to behold is a greasy spoon on a cold wintry day. I recall many in London, at least, were owned by immigrants. Usually from the South of Europe (Cyprus, Italy last one I had in 2010 the owner was Albanian)

Hot steamy tea, loads of builders and construction workers getting their daily required calorie intake. All something very English working class. I used to like the liver and bacon and dark gravy and mushy peas.   Never got into the avocado worship in OZ.  Although it is I believe becoming more popular in London. A NZ operated cafe not too far from where we stayed back in 10 promoted themselves, as well as getting rave reviews for their breakfasts in the style of OZ/NZ as only they know how. Not for me. 

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I don't think it's the fry-up that's gone out of fashion, it's the greasy spoon cafe.  People want nicer surroundings and they don't want food that's swimming in fat or burnt bits on their eggs, that's all.  And they want a decent coffee!

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 hours ago, Blue Flu said:

A joy to behold is a greasy spoon on a cold wintry day. I recall many in London, at least, were owned by immigrants. Usually from the South of Europe (Cyprus, Italy last one I had in 2010 the owner was Albanian)

Hot steamy tea, loads of builders and construction workers getting their daily required calorie intake. All something very English working class. I used to like the liver and bacon and dark gravy and mushy peas.   Never got into the avocado worship in OZ.  Although it is I believe becoming more popular in London. A NZ operated cafe not too far from where we stayed back in 10 promoted themselves, as well as getting rave reviews for their breakfasts in the style of OZ/NZ as only they know how. Not for me. 

The best cup of tea I’ve ever had was from a greasy spoon in London owned and run by an Eastern European family, on a freezing winters day, served in a polystyrene cup. It sounds hideous but it was absolutely perfect for wandering the cold streets in December.

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:evilface_frowning_s

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Don't listen to fake news. The good ol' builders cafe lives on.

Bonus. Most do excellent tea AND coffee.  Contrary to popular belief Australia didn't invent good coffee. We have had Italian coffee lounges since the early 50s.  

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4 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I don't think it's the fry-up that's gone out of fashion, it's the greasy spoon cafe.  People want nicer surroundings and they don't want food that's swimming in fat or burnt bits on their eggs, that's all.  And they want a decent coffee!

I hope that terrible sterility too often associated with 'niceness' in OZ doesn't replace the real thing in England. Double priced and often pretentious  look alikes.  Best avoided and stay with tradition. 

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3 hours ago, MacGyver said:

The best cup of tea I’ve ever had was from a greasy spoon in London owned and run by an Eastern European family, on a freezing winters day, served in a polystyrene cup. It sounds hideous but it was absolutely perfect for wandering the cold streets in December.

My take exactly. Love many of those places to bits. Some also attract characters. So different and so worth upholding. Another fav of mine was to read the Observer/ Sunday Times and Sunday Telegraph  (not to be accused of bias) on a cold wintry Sunday morning at one of my local caf's. 

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32 minutes ago, Blue Flu said:

I hope that terrible sterility too often associated with 'niceness' in OZ doesn't replace the real thing in England. Double priced and often pretentious  look alikes.  Best avoided and stay with tradition. 

The reality is it all comes down to market forces in the end.

If these days people are getting McDonalds breakfast or cracked Avocado on Toast then the greasy spoons will die out.

If people are lining up for a greasy unhealthy breakfast then those cafes will survive and prosper

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Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

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48 minutes ago, Parley said:

The reality is it all comes down to market forces in the end.

If these days people are getting McDonalds breakfast or cracked Avocado on Toast then the greasy spoons will die out.

If people are lining up for a greasy unhealthy breakfast then those cafes will survive and prosper

McDonalds has a far bigger budget to attract consumers compared to your local, often immigrant run greasy spoon. But people appear increasingly attracted to sterility. They associate it with I suspect cleanliness and hence minis germs. 

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We used to go to George's caff in the middle of Newtown (Sydney).  It was an old fashioned style place with fry-ups and Mrs George made all the cakes etc.  Sadly Mr and Mrs George retired in 2000 so that was the end of our Saturday treat.  Many people missed the place.

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2 hours ago, Blue Flu said:

I hope that terrible sterility too often associated with 'niceness' in OZ doesn't replace the real thing in England. Double priced and often pretentious  look alikes.  Best avoided and stay with tradition. 

If by sterility you mean cleanliness, and fresh food well cooked, then I'll take sterility every time.  

I don't know what cafés are like in Perth but in Sydney and Melbourne, they owe a lot to the Italian migrants who arrived in the 50s.   Nowadays they offer excellent coffee but also bacon-and-egg breakfasts cooked in olive oil, not lard, with Italian sausages and sautéed mushrooms.  Sure, some of the Sydney cafés are chrome and steel but who cares when you are sitting outdoors with a view of the harbour or the ocean?  Alternatively, in either Sydney or Melbourne, you're in an old converted warehouse, or a café that seems to have been transplanted from a street in Rome. 

No, I do not miss greasy spoons at all.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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6 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I don't think it's the fry-up that's gone out of fashion, it's the greasy spoon cafe.  People want nicer surroundings and they don't want food that's swimming in fat or burnt bits on their eggs, that's all.  And they want a decent coffee!

I think you're right. Most restaurants down West Coast Highway do all day breakfasts, the modern fry up. Probably the best value meal. I like domes all day breakfast, used to get one at the airport before flying anywhere on work trips. I think the domes gone from the domestic airport now.

Particularly good one at lot one restaurant near Hillarys. Sausage, egg, fried bread, bacon, beans, love it.

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1 hour ago, Blue Flu said:

McDonalds has a far bigger budget to attract consumers compared to your local, often immigrant run greasy spoon. But people appear increasingly attracted to sterility. They associate it with I suspect cleanliness and hence minis germs. 

Maccas would be the last place I'd go to for anything.

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48 minutes ago, Paul1Perth said:

Maccas would be the last place I'd go to for anything.

Double egg muffin for breakfast.  About it really 

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

If by sterility you mean cleanliness, and fresh food well cooked, then I'll take sterility every time.  

I don't know what cafés are like in Perth but in Sydney and Melbourne, they owe a lot to the Italian migrants who arrived in the 50s.   Nowadays they offer excellent coffee but also bacon-and-egg breakfasts cooked in olive oil, not lard, with Italian sausages and sautéed mushrooms.  Sure, some of the Sydney cafés are chrome and steel but who cares when you are sitting outdoors with a view of the harbour or the ocean?  Alternatively, in either Sydney or Melbourne, you're in an old converted warehouse, or a café that seems to have been transplanted from a street in Rome. 

No, I do not miss greasy spoons at all.

Good to have a few transplants be it from Rome or where ever. Cafes in Perth? Over rated in many cases. But know a few okay ones that frequent. I find more expensive than last time in Melbourne or Sydney. Both those cities have in my opinion more' comfortable 'options in style than Perth. (as a rule) I guess more buzz in those cities add to the experience. 

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1 hour ago, Paul1Perth said:

Maccas would be the last place I'd go to for anything.

I haven't stepped foot in one for probably fifteen years. And then it would have been for a thick shake. Only mentioned, because well it was mentioned. 

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Well millions do go to Maccas even if you don't.


Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

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10 hours ago, Rallyman said:

Reasonable coffee from maccies

Surprisingly this is true.  When the McCafés first started appearing, I assumed it was a global thing and didn't pay attention, but I've since learned that they started in Australia because Australians didn't like their American coffee.   I've tried it a few times when I've been out in the country with no other options, and it's usually not bad at all.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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13 hours ago, Marisawright said:

If by sterility you mean cleanliness, and fresh food well cooked, then I'll take sterility every time.  

I don't know what cafés are like in Perth but in Sydney and Melbourne, they owe a lot to the Italian migrants who arrived in the 50s.   Nowadays they offer excellent coffee but also bacon-and-egg breakfasts cooked in olive oil, not lard, with Italian sausages and sautéed mushrooms.  Sure, some of the Sydney cafés are chrome and steel but who cares when you are sitting outdoors with a view of the harbour or the ocean?  Alternatively, in either Sydney or Melbourne, you're in an old converted warehouse, or a café that seems to have been transplanted from a street in Rome. 

No, I do not miss greasy spoons at all.

No I mean character both in design and some of the individuals who may frequent it. Or be reflective to suit different moods. For example those establishments more suited for people watching due to location. Then there are those where people interact with strangers with ease. Or those where you go and read the newspaper or a book and won't be disturbed.  

The greasy spoons were just another variety of cafe , unpretentious , often colourful  , best of all great value. Probably hard to really transport the 'real deal' . But better than nothing. A bit like theme Aussie pubs in London , or indeed Paris , or Irish pubs in various countries or Texan bars. I've never been to a greasy spoon in Australia , even those that serve similar fare, that comes very close in atmosphere to those knew in England. 

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38 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Surprisingly this is true.  When the McCafés first started appearing, I assumed it was a global thing and didn't pay attention, but I've since learned that they started in Australia because Australians didn't like their American coffee.   I've tried it a few times when I've been out in the country with no other options, and it's usually not bad at all.  

Cheap coffee as well (compared to other places) and I too recall it being quite acceptable. We often stopped at such places when driving from Cairns to Darwin back in the nineties for breakfast. 

Edited by Blue Flu

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