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simmo

Cats must be kept on leads 😿🐈‍⬛

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Fremantle authorities might kill cats they find out on council land without leads. 

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Nothing wrong with that, if animals are impounded a lot end up put to sleep, or as you write 'killed''! lol

Some states already have a rule that cats must not be allowed off your property. In QLD you also need a permit to keep more than 2 at home.

Cal x

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If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

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21 minutes ago, calNgary said:

Nothing wrong with that, if animals are impounded a lot end up put to sleep, or as you write 'killed''! lol

Some states already have a rule that cats must not be allowed off your property. In QLD you also need a permit to keep more than 2 at home.

Cal x

Cats should be able to go for a walk on their own without being killed.

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12 hours ago, simmo said:

Fremantle authorities might kill cats they find out on council land without leads. 

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Can't see a problem with that.

You wouldn't let your dog play in the road with traffic.


Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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Stupid councils. They are mostly all hopeless run by millennial greenies.

Typical overreach.

Councils should stick to the basics like Roads, Rubbish Collection etc. Trying to catch a resident's cat and execute it is despicable.

How would you fell @simmo if the council caught your cat and executed it?

Edited by Parley
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You'd think Fremantle council would have far more to worry about with the steady decline of that city. Sad to witness its decline from last century. Cats do inflict massive destruction of wildlife outside. But this motion is simply window dressing .

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20 hours ago, simmo said:

Cats should be able to go for a walk on their own without being killed.

we still have birds in our country......cats outside in cat containment suburbs do just seem to "disappear".  I think the snakes must be getting them?

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20 hours ago, calNgary said:

Nothing wrong with that, if animals are impounded a lot end up put to sleep, or as you write 'killed''! lol

Some states already have a rule that cats must not be allowed off your property. In QLD you also need a permit to keep more than 2 at home.

Cal x

I'd never have a cat in Australia.  We had two in the UK, chocolate and blue tonkinese that were more like dogs the way they behaved and could be walked on leads. 

But they are not right for this country.  Not fair to keep them in cages or indoors, it's no sort of life for them.

 

Edited by Robert Dyson
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9 hours ago, newjez said:

Can't see a problem with that.

You wouldn't let your dog play in the road with traffic.

Roads, traffic? I don't think you get it jez.

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52 minutes ago, Robert Dyson said:

I'd never have a cat in Australia.  We had two in the UK, chocolate and blue tonkinese that were more like dogs the way they behaved and could be walked on leads. 

But they are not right for this country.  Not fair to keep them in cages or indoors, it's no sort of life for them.

 

Why aren't they right?

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9 hours ago, simmo said:

Why aren't they right?

I think I first read about this happening in Canberra. The argument (if I recall correctly) was that cats are such effective hunters they were decimating native wildlife and having a huge impact on the local ecosystem.

I don’t remember threats to harm the cats in that situation, I always assumed owners would be fined for non compliance rather than punishing cats for being cats. I don’t necessarily disagree with trying to limit cats killing native wildlife, but harming them as a consequence seems the wrong move to me.

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3 hours ago, MacGyver said:

I don’t remember threats to harm the cats in that situation, I always assumed owners would be fined for non compliance rather than punishing cats for being cats. I don’t necessarily disagree with trying to limit cats killing native wildlife, but harming them as a consequence seems the wrong move to me.

It's not the Government that's harming them.  If a cat is going into gardens and hunting birds, it's not uncommon for it to "disappear" so they are obviously being done away with, but the snakes get the blame....

Yes, all new suburbs in Canberra are cat containment areas; you can build a run in the garden attached to a house, but it needs to be fully enclosed.  No fun for a cat being restricted like that, or being kept indoors permanently as some are is even crueller.

Feral cats are the single most destructive invasive species in Australia, and the ferals come from escaped non-desexed house cats. Currently $25 billlion per year is spent on trying to control non-native invasive species.   They will never get rid of cats from the country, but they can control them in populated areas and people prefer to have the spectacular native birdlife instead.  No council would introduce these control policies if there wasn't public support.

 

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As I said earlier ( my local council) they are banned outside of your home, if you are having issues they will supply a cage to catch them and if they are found to be chipped they are returned to owner I think it’s 2 strikes and then out , any non chipped is euthanised

All to protect local wildlife . 

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16 hours ago, Robert Dyson said:

I'd never have a cat in Australia......  Not fair to keep them in cages or indoors, it's no sort of life for them.

 

It is quite possible to build a cat-proof containment area so that they are free to roam outside in the garden but not wander off the property.

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3 hours ago, Robert Dyson said:

Yes, all new suburbs in Canberra are cat containment areas; you can build a run in the garden attached to a house, but it needs to be fully enclosed.  No fun for a cat being restricted like that, ...

It's no fun for a cat being hit by a car, chased by dogs, trapped and killed by cat haters or die an agonising death by snake bite either.   An uncontained cat in Australia has an average life span of around 6 years - about 10 years less than when kept in a safe environment.

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14 minutes ago, Skani said:

It's no fun for a cat being hit by a car, chased by dogs, trapped and killed by cat haters or die an agonising death by snake bite either.   An uncontained cat in Australia has an average life span of around 6 years - about 10 years less than when kept in a safe environment.

My English cats lived in the house but were free to wander, they lived to 16 and 14 and generally need a hunting zone and a territory,  males moreso than females.  Siamese-based are fighting cats and they loved to go out and fight other infiltrating cats, very dominant and very vocal animals and they would go after small dogs.  They used to regularly catch birds and mice and bring them inside as offerings, but it doesn't make much difference in the UK with millions of cats roaming wild all the time, and not much birdlife left in urban areas except for vermin pigeons and sparrows.

In Australia it's very different, the wildlife is on the ground a lot more, we have rare protected species, and an abundance of birdlife that the UK can only dream of.  For that reason alone roaming cats are not a good idea when they can be restricted.

As for the cats themselves, it's not right to keep them caged up just as it's not right to keep a bird in a cage.  That's no quality of life for the animal and is solely for the benefit of the owner using them as a pet, so surely we should be doing what most Aussies do and get a dog instead that doesn't have natural predatory instincts towards birds?

 

Edited by Robert Dyson

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It's often said that if you die your dog will lie by your side and starve itself to death rather than leave you.  A cat will just eat you.

 

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3 minutes ago, Robert Dyson said:

As for the cats themselves, it's not right to keep them caged up just as it's not right to keep a bird in a cage.  That's no quality of life for the animal and is solely for the benefit of the owner using them as a pet, so surely we should be doing what most Aussies do and get a dog instead that doesn't have natural predatory instincts towards birds?

Wildlife refuges are inundated with native species killed or injured by dogs so it's not a matter of either or.

I have 3 cats - 2 aged 17 and a 15 year old - who are free to roam in the garden, climb things, sit on the balcony, watch the birds outside the fence without attacking them - but not wander off the property.  Before we installed the cat proof fence I lost one cat to a car, another chased by a dog and then hit by a car and one to snakebite.   I would never place a cat in that risky situation again.

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48 minutes ago, Robert Dyson said:

As for the cats themselves, it's not right to keep them caged up just as it's not right to keep a bird in a cage.  That's no quality of life for the animal ....

I think you're ascribing human feelings to animals.  

I agree that if you keep a bird in a cage where it can't even fly, that's obviously cruel.   Keep birds in a large, airy aviary and is it still cruel?   Consider the size of a cat and the size of the average apartment or house. Plenty of room to run around, be stimulated with toys and games etc.   Think of the big cats in the wild - lions, tigers - and they're majestically lazy anmals, stirring themselves only to hunt or find a mate.  

Funnily enough, if you're a dog owner then you'll keep your dog indoors or in the garden all day and all night, without a second thought.  Do you think the dog is miserable and spends all his time praying for those brief periods when he's taken for a walk?  

On that score, I don't agree with @Skani that it's not either/or.   It would be, IF dog owners let their dogs out to roam the neighbourhood at will as cat owners do, but few city dog owners would do that. Their dogs are kept on their property and when they do go out for a walk, it's under their owner's supervision. 

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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33 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

On that score, I don't agree with @Skani that it's not either/or.   It would be, IF dog owners let their dogs out to roam the neighbourhood at will as cat owners do, but few city dog owners would do that. Their dogs are kept on their property and when they do go out for a walk, it's under their owner's supervision. 

I was disagreeing with the implication that replacing cats with dogs would save other creatures.  Yes, many birds would be safer but penguins, cassowaries, ground/  shore nesting birds and domestic poultry are regularly the victim of dog attacks.   And dogs will attack larger wildlife which a cat wouldn't  - not to mention  livestock such as sheep.  Maybe not a problem in inner city areas but in  suburban and country areas dogs are frequently not under control.  The solution is  effective control of both cats and dogs.

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21 minutes ago, Skani said:

I was disagreeing with the implication that replacing cats with dogs would save other creatures.  Yes, many birds would be safer but penguins, cassowaries, ground/  shore nesting birds and domestic poultry are regularly the victim of dog attacks.   And dogs will attack larger wildlife which a cat wouldn't  - not to mention  livestock such as sheep.  Maybe not a problem in inner city areas but in  suburban and country areas dogs are frequently not under control.  The solution is  effective control of both cats and dogs.

My dog is half Jack Russell and a hunter.  I can't let him off the lead where there are rabbits or pademelons around.  That's usually early morning or evening when they are active.  I've seen irresponsible owners letting their dogs go hunting.  When we first got our dog he caught a rabbit - never again!  

It really upsets me when I see a little penguin lying on the beach that has been killed by a dog.

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49 minutes ago, Toots said:

My dog is half Jack Russell and a hunter.  I can't let him off the lead where there are rabbits or pademelons around.  That's usually early morning or evening when they are active.  I've seen irresponsible owners letting their dogs go hunting.  When we first got our dog he caught a rabbit - never again!  

It really upsets me when I see a little penguin lying on the beach that has been killed by a dog.

I do like cats, but they should definitely be in at night.

I think I’m known as Mrs Grumpy around the lake, I’m so fed up with irresponsible dog owners who don’t abide by the clearly printed ‘all dogs on a leash’. They think it’s fine that their dogs bound up to me with an ‘it’s alright it’s friendly yell’. So I now yell ahead ‘put your dog on the leash please before it’s near me!’. 

Some posters might remember that I was knocked unconscious, ambulance to hospital and had concussion, by a dog running out of a cafe straight through my legs a few years ago., so I have a low tolerance level for dogs of leash, Unless in an area it’s allowed.

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2 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I think you're ascribing human feelings to animals.  

I agree that if you keep a bird in a cage where it can't even fly, that's obviously cruel.   Keep birds in a large, airy aviary and is it still cruel?   Consider the size of a cat and the size of the average apartment or house. Plenty of room to run around, be stimulated with toys and games etc.   Think of the big cats in the wild - lions, tigers - and they're majestically lazy anmals, stirring themselves only to hunt or find a mate.  

Funnily enough, if you're a dog owner then you'll keep your dog indoors or in the garden all day and all night, without a second thought.  Do you think the dog is miserable and spends all his time praying for those brief periods when he's taken for a walk?  

On that score, I don't agree with @Skani that it's not either/or.   It would be, IF dog owners let their dogs out to roam the neighbourhood at will as cat owners do, but few city dog owners would do that. Their dogs are kept on their property and when they do go out for a walk, it's under their owner's supervision. 

Lions have massive roaming territories for hunting, and cats want the same if they're not well fed...they're from the same genetic root.  Cats are a lot more intelligent than dogs, they don't need constant stimulation like a dog does, but they are far more self-sufficient and able to look after themselves.  They are predators.

Yes, you have the answer....if people want to keep cats they take them out on a lead, but they shouldn't be allowed to roam freely in areas where they cause great damage.   Yet if they're not allowed to roam freely I think that's very cruel, so they just shouldn't have them as pets in Australia period.

 

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