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2Para_Mike83

Bringing Mother in Law

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Hi, I'm new to the site and would really appreciate some advice.

I am currently in the process of coming to Australia to work which will be on a sponsored visa. My wife is an only child, we have 2 children and the mother in law lives with us in the UK and is financially vested. I need to bring her with us.

Is there some way to attach her to my visa? We essentially support her now household wise and she has savings and investment Ms for her everyday money.

 

Any help would be much appreciated 🙏 👍 

 

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4 hours ago, 2Para_Mike83 said:

Hi, I'm new to the site and would really appreciate some advice.

I am currently in the process of coming to Australia to work which will be on a sponsored visa. My wife is an only child, we have 2 children and the mother in law lives with us in the UK and is financially vested. I need to bring her with us.

Is there some way to attach her to my visa? We essentially support her now household wise and she has savings and investment Ms for her everyday money.

 

Any help would be much appreciated 🙏 👍 

 

You can't 'attach' her to your application.

If you are going to Australia on a permanent visa, once you are 'settled' you can look at sponsoring her for a parent visa, but this is a long term strategy. In the interim, or if you are going on a temporary TSS visa, then her only option would be to come over for shorter periods as a tourist.

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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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58 minutes ago, paulhand said:

You can't 'attach' her to your application.

If you are going to Australia on a permanent visa, once you are 'settled' you can look at sponsoring her for a parent visa, but this is a long term strategy. In the interim, or if you are going on a temporary TSS visa, then her only option would be to come over for shorter periods as a tourist.

Have they stopped allowing adult dependents now? Or are the rules around that very narrow? When I migrated in 2005 I thought there was an option to include an evidenced dependent parent to an application. Maybe I dreamt it…. 🙈😂

Edited by Amber Snowball

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1 hour ago, Amber Snowball said:

Have they stopped allowing adult dependents now? Or are the rules around that very narrow? When I migrated in 2005 I thought there was an option to include an evidenced dependent parent to an application. Maybe I dreamt it…. 🙈😂

She may live with them but that’s a long way off her being dependent on them without any other options.  It says she has savings and investments but even without these, she is living in the UK which would make it near impossible to evidence she is dependant on another because the state would keep her if there was no other option.  Can you imagine the amount of dependent applications there would be if the criteria was as easy as you only had to have another adult live with you.  It’s the same as child dependents.  The upper age limit is 23 and even then only if you can prove they are reliant on you for food, shelter and clothing (ie. they are in full time education)  Even if they are a day over 23 you can’t include them regardless of if they are earning or not.  They,  just like any adult can depend on the state if necessary. As Paul says, I am sure they will have to use the same routes that other parents use. 

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39 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

She may live with them but that’s a long way off her being dependent on them without any other options.  It says she has savings and investments but even without these, she is living in the UK which would make it near impossible to evidence she is dependant on another because the state would keep her if there was no other option.  Can you imagine the amount of dependent applications there would be if the criteria was as easy as you only had to have another adult live with you.  It’s the same as child dependents.  The upper age limit is 23 and even then only if you can prove they are reliant on you for food, shelter and clothing (ie. they are in full time education)  Even if they are a day over 23 you can’t include them regardless of if they are earning or not.  They,  just like any adult can depend on the state if necessary. As Paul says, I am sure they will have to use the same routes that other parents use. 

Yes, absolutely agree. Just thought there used to be an adult dependents clause, obviously it had very strict rules and required lots of evidence. 
I might have been confusing it with something else. 🤷🏻‍♀️

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Dependent children under 25 years of are who are undertaking approved full time studies can be included as secondary applicants on some visa applications. There is a caveat about when the studies must have commenced and there are further conditions, about which prospective applicants should inform themselves.


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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4 hours ago, Amber Snowball said:

Have they stopped allowing adult dependents now? Or are the rules around that very narrow? When I migrated in 2005 I thought there was an option to include an evidenced dependent parent to an application. Maybe I dreamt it…. 🙈😂

It used to be allowed but they changed the Regulations years ago in this regard. 

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Raul T Senise

Registered Migration Agent

MARN 0636699

www.ozimmigration.com

"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."

 

 

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Just now, Raul Senise said:

It used to be allowed but they changed the Regulations years ago in this regard. 

Ah thanks Raul. I’m not mad then. 😂

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2 hours ago, Amber Snowball said:

Yes, absolutely agree. Just thought there used to be an adult dependents clause, obviously it had very strict rules and required lots of evidence. 
I might have been confusing it with something else. 🤷🏻‍♀️

I think there still is such a visa but I expect they are more likely issued to those from certain countries.  In many countries/cultures the parents are totally reliant on their children to care for them.  In the UK though mature/elderly parents would be housed and given benefits by the state to keep them so it would be impossible to claim they are dependent on someone else for survival. 
 

Just seen Raul’s update after typing this. 

Edited by Tulip1

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1 hour ago, wrussell said:

Dependent children under 25 years of are who are undertaking approved full time studies can be included as secondary applicants on some visa applications. There is a caveat about when the studies must have commenced and there are further conditions, about which prospective applicants should inform themselves.

I didn’t realise that.  I only know to be dependent on a parent visa the cut off is 23.  With the cut backs on these visas my clock is very much ticking in this regard.  

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10 hours ago, 2Para_Mike83 said:

I am currently in the process of coming to Australia to work which will be on a sponsored visa. My wife is an only child, we have 2 children and the mother in law lives with us in the UK and is financially vested. I need to bring her with us.

Impossible.   There is a parent visa, but you can't even apply for one until you've got a permanent visa yourself and have lived here for a few years.  By that time, it's impossible to predict what kind of parent visa will be available or whether it will be offered at all. 

However if it's the same as it is now, once you apply you'll have to wait at least 15 years to get the visa granted - only a very small quota is granted each year, and there's already a waiting list of thousands. 

Bottom line is that most countries don't want to allow parents in because they are a massive cost to the taxpayer in medical and aged care costs as they get older.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On another subject (you may be aware of this, but just in case):  If you are arriving on a 482 visa, and you've been told you can seamlessly transition to a permanent visa in due course, please don't believe it.  

The reality is that in due course, you may be eligible to apply for a permanent visa, IF the rules haven't changed (and they do, every year) and IF your employer is still willing/able to sponsor you for permanency.  It's not seamless and it's not guaranteed.  Some 482 holders are successful, but a large percentage don't make it.  Just check out the threads about the 186 visa here, to see how stressful and uncertain it is. 

The 482 is a great opportunity to broaden the kids' horizons and enjoy an adventure for a few years, and that's the best way to view it. If you get permanency at the end, that's a bonus. Do your planning on that basis - don't sell your house, rent it out, for instance, and push for a good relocation package so you don't spend half your savings on the move there and back. 

Edit:  I meant to mention, check out the cost of childcare in Australia, and also check what (if any) subsidy you'd get as a temp visa holder.  Also school fees depending on the state you're going to.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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