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JetBlast

Heaps of temporary visa holders will be permitted across the international border 1st December.

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With the language being "visa holders," I'm interpreting this as we still won't see processing of offshore applications such as 190 and 189, since we don't "hold visas," correct?


Carpenter from the US | Waiting on my 190 grant for NSW with 75 points.
Started migration process
: April 2019 | Vetassess : December 2019 (Belfast, N. Ireland) |
 PTE : Dec 2019  (two attempts in San Antonio, TX) | 190 and 189 EOI applied for : February 2020 | Invited (190) : 13th March, 2020 Applied : 30 March, 2020 | CO Contact: 24th October, 2022 (requested medicals and new form 80). Responded to CO: 5th November, 2022. VISA GRANTED: 🏄‍♀️ 10th November, 2022. 🐨

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1 hour ago, nomadiccarpenter said:

With the language being "visa holders," I'm interpreting this as we still won't see processing of offshore applications such as 190 and 189, since we don't "hold visas," correct?

I don't think it has any relevance to offshore processing at all.  

The pause in processing offshore applications was due to a concern that there would be a big surge in unemployment due to Covid shutdowns, so they didn't want to award visas in occupations where there wouldn't be a need.  Here's a quote from Immigration:  "The government is closely monitoring migration and visa settings to ensure they are consistent with public health measures, are flexible and do not displace job opportunities for Australians so that Australia can deal with the immediate and post-recovery impacts of COVID-19." 

One would think they've worked out what the needs are likely to be post-Covid so they could start re-opening, but who knows?  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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1 minute ago, Marisawright said:

I don't think it has any relevance to offshore processing at all.  

The pause in processing offshore applications was due to a concern that there would be a big surge in unemployment due to Covid shutdowns, so they didn't want to award visas in occupations where there wouldn't be a need.  Here's a quote from Immigration:  "The government is closely monitoring migration and visa settings to ensure they are consistent with public health measures, are flexible and do not displace job opportunities for Australians so that Australia can deal with the immediate and post-recovery impacts of COVID-19." 

One would think they've worked out what the needs are likely to be post-Covid so they could start re-opening, but who knows?  

There is a huge skill shortage in SA. We need good people. It’s a nightmare finding skilled workers. 

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29 minutes ago, JetBlast said:

There is a huge skill shortage in SA. We need good people. It’s a nightmare finding skilled workers. 

There are shortages all over the country, I believe.   Although I think in some industries (not necessarily yours), it's highlighting the way in which Australian employers have dropped the ball on training, and also aren't prepared to pay a fair salary for the skills they're seeking.

A couple of small examples at a junior level, from hospitality:  I was struck by a Melbourne restaurant manager complaining that they can't get waiters, and as a last resort,  they've had to hire an untrained local 18-year-old.  Another example was a café, again short of waiters, which had hired local retirees.   The presenter interviewed the retirees, women who looked to be in their late 50s/early 60s.  They expressed delight at being given the chance of a job and said they hoped the café might consider keeping them on once the borders opened.  What I found concerning was that they didn't seem at all confident the cafe would keep them on.  Perhaps because they had to be paid more than a backpacker?

 

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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6 hours ago, Marisawright said:

There are shortages all over the country, I believe.   Although I think in some industries (not necessarily yours), it's highlighting the way in which Australian employers have dropped the ball on training, and also aren't prepared to pay a fair salary for the skills they're seeking.

A couple of small examples at a junior level, from hospitality:  I was struck by a Melbourne restaurant manager complaining that they can't get waiters, and as a last resort,  they've had to hire an untrained local 18-year-old.  Another example was a café, again short of waiters, which had hired local retirees.   The presenter interviewed the retirees, women who looked to be in their late 50s/early 60s.  They expressed delight at being given the chance of a job and said they hoped the café might consider keeping them on once the borders opened.  What I found concerning was that they didn't seem at all confident the cafe would keep them on.  Perhaps because they had to be paid more than a backpacker?

 

I hope these ladies do get to keep their jobs.  You dont need qualifications to waitress in a cafe, that certainly shows by some of the service you get!  Untrained 18 year old!  Whats wrong with that, as long as you can be pleasant to your customers and remember a few orders I think most people could manage!

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10 hours ago, Marisawright said:

"The government is closely monitoring migration and visa settings to ensure they are consistent with public health measures, are flexible and do not displace job opportunities for Australians so that Australia can deal with the immediate and post-recovery impacts of COVID-19." 

We get the same paranoid thinking from leaders in America too but the consequences are far greater for Australia. Truth is, if the job could be filled it would. Australia has already tried not having immigration and it isn't working. It's frustrating to see them take money from people only to have them wait close to three years.


Carpenter from the US | Waiting on my 190 grant for NSW with 75 points.
Started migration process
: April 2019 | Vetassess : December 2019 (Belfast, N. Ireland) |
 PTE : Dec 2019  (two attempts in San Antonio, TX) | 190 and 189 EOI applied for : February 2020 | Invited (190) : 13th March, 2020 Applied : 30 March, 2020 | CO Contact: 24th October, 2022 (requested medicals and new form 80). Responded to CO: 5th November, 2022. VISA GRANTED: 🏄‍♀️ 10th November, 2022. 🐨

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5 hours ago, nomadiccarpenter said:

We get the same paranoid thinking from leaders in America too but the consequences are far greater for Australia. Truth is, if the job could be filled it would. Australia has already tried not having immigration and it isn't working. It's frustrating to see them take money from people only to have them wait close to three years.

To be fair, when they took the money, they had no idea they'd be closing the country.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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Business can barely wait for the doors to reopen and mass migration. It suppresses wages and makes the economy look better than really is. But one question. Just where are these newcomers to live? Just what impact will it    have on the inflated housing market? Of course Australia needs migrants. But at what number? A quick easy fix short term perhaps but at a cost to locals longer term. 

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6 hours ago, nomadiccarpenter said:

We get the same paranoid thinking from leaders in America too but the consequences are far greater for Australia. Truth is, if the job could be filled it would. Australia has already tried not having immigration and it isn't working. It's frustrating to see them take money from people only to have them wait close to three years.

Well around me a lot of people have simply left the 'traditional 'work force, all ages I'm talking here . I guess low paid service industry work would not  be off interest to those that may have once sought such employment. 

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19 hours ago, Marisawright said:

To be fair, when they took the money, they had no idea they'd be closing the country.  

Touche.

 

17 hours ago, Blue Flu said:

Well around me a lot of people have simply left the 'traditional 'work force, all ages I'm talking here . I guess low paid service industry work would not  be off interest to those that may have once sought such employment. 

Seems to be a trend in every developed country. I wonder how many of the applicants who have been waiting years will still work in their profession when the grant finally arrives.


Carpenter from the US | Waiting on my 190 grant for NSW with 75 points.
Started migration process
: April 2019 | Vetassess : December 2019 (Belfast, N. Ireland) |
 PTE : Dec 2019  (two attempts in San Antonio, TX) | 190 and 189 EOI applied for : February 2020 | Invited (190) : 13th March, 2020 Applied : 30 March, 2020 | CO Contact: 24th October, 2022 (requested medicals and new form 80). Responded to CO: 5th November, 2022. VISA GRANTED: 🏄‍♀️ 10th November, 2022. 🐨

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7 hours ago, nomadiccarpenter said:

Touche.

 

Seems to be a trend in every developed country. I wonder how many of the applicants who have been waiting years will still work in their profession when the grant finally arrives.

No idea. Or even how certain professions will 'stack up' over time in terms of need. I suspect it is people seeking early retirement in many cases. Employment is not delivering on many fronts these days. A host of issues. Around me, what I'll call 'the black economy' is going gang busters.  

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