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Zeehayder

Want to migrate/move my parents to australia

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Hello Team,

I really need your help, please see the details below:

Situation

Parents Age

  • Father Age: 67
  • Mother Age: 63

We are 4 brothers and sisters:

  • 1 sister lives in Australia from the last 5 years (Permanent Resident) with family. Both my sister and her husband are doing reputable, good earning jobs. 
  • 1 brother lives in Australia from the last 4 years completed his graduation and is now on temerparay residency visa and working to apply for PR in the next 3-4 months. He is currently doing IT job, so financially he is settled.
  • I live in the UK
  • 1 sister lives in Ireland

As you can see, my parents are alone in Pakistan and I support them and have all the Western Union proof. They have travelled to the UK (twice) Ireland (3 times) / Australia (once). They applied for a visit visa again for Australia and were granted 2 years multiple entry visa (subclass 600) expiring on 13th March 2022 with the below conditions:

  • 8101 - No work
  • 8201 - Maximum three months study 

under length of stay is 3 months from the date of each arrival. 

Due to covid, they were not able to travel as the border were closed, now they are planning to travel there. Is there any option for them to permanently stay there with their daughter and son?

I will really appreciate it if someone can guide me as we all are worried about them especially after COVID as they are all alone there so we all want them to settle in Australia. Waiting for the response and guidance. Please feel free to ask for any more details. 

 

 

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There are permanent parent visas, but the waiting time for those visas is over 15 years.  

If they arrive in Australia and then apply for a permanent visa, they will be put on a bridging visa which will allow them to stay until the visa is granted (which, as I say, will be at least 15 years).  However, that is not an easy choice.

On a bridging visa, they are not permanent residents and have no status in Australia. They will not be entitled to any pensions or benefits or Medicare.  Without Medicare, medical treatment will be very expensive indeed.   They are not allowed to buy the health insurance available to permanent residents, so they will have to buy Overseas Health Insurance which will cost around $10,000 every year.  

On a bridging visa, they are not allowed to leave Australia, even for a holiday.  They must apply for special permission (a BVB) every time they wish to leave the country.  If they leave without a BVB, they will not be permitted to return and will never be granted the full parent visa.

By the time the visa is ready to be granted, they will be over 80.  If they are still alive, they will have to pass a medical to get the visa. If they fail the medical - which at that age, they might - they will be sent back to Pakistan. 

 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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4 hours ago, Marisawright said:

There are permanent parent visas, but the waiting time for those visas is over 15 years.  

If they arrive in Australia and then apply for a permanent visa, they will be put on a bridging visa which will allow them to stay until the visa is granted (which, as I say, will be at least 15 years).  However, that is not an easy choice.

On a bridging visa, they are not permanent residents and have no status in Australia. They will not be entitled to any pensions or benefits or Medicare.  Without Medicare, medical treatment will be very expensive indeed.   They are not allowed to buy the health insurance available to permanent residents, so they will have to buy Overseas Health Insurance which will cost around $10,000 every year.  

On a bridging visa, they are not allowed to leave Australia, even for a holiday.  They must apply for special permission (a BVB) every time they wish to leave the country.  If they leave without a BVB, they will not be permitted to return and will never be granted the full parent visa.

By the time the visa is ready to be granted, they will be over 80.  If they are still alive, they will have to pass a medical to get the visa. If they fail the medical - which at that age, they might - they will be sent back to Pakistan. 

 

What an excellent post Marisa.  I have seen so many comments on other forums of people being encouraged to apply for bridging visas after entering on a 600 Visa until the grant of their 143 - often in many cases to be expected years down the line! I don't think that people really truly take on board how difficult restrictions will be in reality and indeed expensive in health terms should a parent fall ill.  I think all should read your post!  My husband and I just patiently waiting for our 143 lodged in March 2017 to move forward at some point (don't expect a miracle though!).  Our main focus at this time is hoping our tourist visas 651 and exemptions will be approved soon so we can at last see our daughters and grandchildren (based in Melbourne and Perth) in January 2022 after months and months of separation. The pandemic sure has put the whole situation into perspective about what is important!

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On a more technical level, until your 2nd brother is granted permanent residence status, your parents will not meet the balance of family test for a parent visa. I suggest you set up a consultation with a registered migration agent to go through possible pathways. 

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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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13 hours ago, Marisawright said:

There are permanent parent visas, but the waiting time for those visas is over 15 years.  

If they arrive in Australia and then apply for a permanent visa, they will be put on a bridging visa which will allow them to stay until the visa is granted (which, as I say, will be at least 15 years).  However, that is not an easy choice.

On a bridging visa, they are not permanent residents and have no status in Australia. They will not be entitled to any pensions or benefits or Medicare.  Without Medicare, medical treatment will be very expensive indeed.   They are not allowed to buy the health insurance available to permanent residents, so they will have to buy Overseas Health Insurance which will cost around $10,000 every year.  

On a bridging visa, they are not allowed to leave Australia, even for a holiday.  They must apply for special permission (a BVB) every time they wish to leave the country.  If they leave without a BVB, they will not be permitted to return and will never be granted the full parent visa.

By the time the visa is ready to be granted, they will be over 80.  If they are still alive, they will have to pass a medical to get the visa. If they fail the medical - which at that age, they might - they will be sent back to Pakistan. 

 

Thanks, Maria for your message, I really appreciate you spending time to read and reply back.basic-visitor-cover-factsheet.pdf

I understand the consequences but as stated I support them and send them expenses every month but the main concern is that they are alone there and have no one to support them. At this age we want them to be with their children and not alone. We should be serving them in this age.

In regards to expense, I did check overseas visitor insurance and good cover insurance costs approximately $50 per week for the couple, please see fact sheet attached as it covers most of the things like Emergency, GP, Dental. It will cost me approximately $2500 - $3000 per year to cover them medically. 

I also understand travel restrictions, we are happy with that as they would be staying mainly with us and occasionally going to UK or Dublin every year which can be achieved by getting BVB.

Last point about passing medical at age of 80 approx, if they fail then we will go with some other options based on human rights as there is no way they will say to send back 80 year old couple after spending 15 years. The main point is even if we get time with them until 80 then it will be a wish come true.

I understand all the consequences but I believe there is workaround for everything as we are not willing to leave them alone there for the rest of their life

My question is, is it doable for them to travel on an existing visit visa and then apply for a permanent visa? If yes, do they fulfil the requirements? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, paulhand said:

On a more technical level, until your 2nd brother is granted permanent residence status, your parents will not meet the balance of family test for a parent visa. I suggest you set up a consultation with a registered migration agent to go through possible pathways. 

Thanks Paul, will they consider if my brother has applied for PR or do they require PR as an active status?

Do you know any good immigration consultants? 

 

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1 minute ago, Zeehayder said:

Thanks Paul, will they consider if my brother has applied for PR or do they require PR as an active status?

Do you know any good immigration consultants? 

 

Paul is himself a reputable agent. See his signature for his website to contact him. Good luck. 👍

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2 minutes ago, Amber Snowball said:

Paul is himself a reputable agent. See his signature for his website to contact him. Good luck. 👍

dialed his number and currently on hold 😉 

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1 minute ago, Zeehayder said:

dialed his number and currently on hold 😉 

😂 he’s a popular chap!
Paul will see you right. Might be a small fee but worth it for realistic strategy and advice. 

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12 hours ago, Zeehayder said:

Thanks Paul, will they consider if my brother has applied for PR or do they require PR as an active status?

He must actually hold PR status before you can do anything.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 09/11/2021 at 01:29, Sue 320 said:

What an excellent post Marisa.  I have seen so many comments on other forums of people being encouraged to apply for bridging visas after entering on a 600 Visa until the grant of their 143 - often in many cases to be expected years down the line! I don't think that people really truly take on board how difficult restrictions will be in reality and indeed expensive in health terms should a parent fall ill.  I think all should read your post!  My husband and I just patiently waiting for our 143 lodged in March 2017 to move forward at some point (don't expect a miracle though!).  Our main focus at this time is hoping our tourist visas 651 and exemptions will be approved soon so we can at last see our daughters and grandchildren (based in Melbourne and Perth) in January 2022 after months and months of separation. The pandemic sure has put the whole situation into perspective about what is important!

If you enter now on 600 whilst waiting for 143 there are no bridging visas allowed. 143 does not carry access to bridging visa unless there are very specific conditions met - you had to be onshore before 24 March 2021 and already applied for 143 before that date -  it was a specific Covid concession to Keep people legal during the border closure. 

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143 lodged 21 June 2017

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On 09/11/2021 at 23:32, Zeehayder said:

Last point about passing medical at age of 80 approx, if they fail then we will go with some other options based on human rights as there is no way they will say to send back 80 year old couple after spending 15 years.

 

That is a disgraceful thing to say. You are saying that, even if there is no legal way for your parents to stay, you will seek to embarrass the Australian government into allowing them to stay anyway? You should be ashamed of yourself. 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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8 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

That is a disgraceful thing to say. You are saying that, even if there is no legal way for your parents to stay, you will seek to embarrass the Australian government into allowing them to stay anyway? You should be ashamed of yourself. 

It’s people doing things like this that is causing the rules to be continuously tightened so it is getting harder and harder for people who are playing by the rules. It makes me very angry.

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12 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

That is a disgraceful thing to say. You are saying that, even if there is no legal way for your parents to stay, you will seek to embarrass the Australian government into allowing them to stay anyway? You should be ashamed of yourself. 

@Zeehayder should be very careful.

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/exclusive-great-grandmother-93-could-be-deported-after-11-years-in-australia/062e3c85-ac56-485e-8a37-7dce870efca3

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@Zeehayder are you aware that on an open forum like this that it is very likely immi also have access?? You may have set up a red flag!! 

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143 lodged 21 June 2017

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It's about time that they started putting a no further stay clause on all visitor visas, just reading these boards with people who want to queue jump the system left right and centre.  The right thing to do is to put in your application for the CPV and make regular visits while you wait. But wait offshore like the folk who are doing it by the rules.

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6 minutes ago, Quoll said:

It's about time that they started putting a no further stay clause on all visitor visas, just reading these boards with people who want to queue jump the system left right and centre.  The right thing to do is to put in your application for the CPV and make regular visits while you wait. But wait offshore like the folk who are doing it by the rules.

I couldn't agree more! 

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

That is a disgraceful thing to say. You are saying that, even if there is no legal way for your parents to stay, you will seek to embarrass the Australian government into allowing them to stay anyway? You should be ashamed of yourself. 

well, what is disgraceful in it? 

Am I breaking any law?

Am I lying?

Am I doing anything against the defined law?

I won't be relying on the state benefits not my parents, will have private insurance to cover medical and all

What I am doing is 

To spend time together as a family for rest of the life

Worried for my parents.

Want to spend time with my family which is my right 🙂

Want to make sure the rest of my parents' life is spent together and is hassle-free

Want to make sure that my parents have support and access to their children whenever they need

Isn't this my right or should I suffer/be punished for moving abroad and serving the community? 

I know you may have different culture but this is how we define our family values. I don't need any further argument. If you cannot help then you go to other forum/post to take your frustration/anger out 🙂 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Zeehayder

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3 hours ago, Booma said:

It’s people doing things like this that is causing the rules to be continuously tightened so it is getting harder and harder for people who are playing by the rules. It makes me very angry.

I am also going by rules and not breaking any rules. Read the post again, I never said that I will make them stay there illegally, I only said will avail the option we have now and will see what happens after 15 years as the world may end in 15 years or no one is alive so I cannot stop myself thinking about 15 years later or planning about 15 years later 🙂 

This is also for sister @Marisawright. Live in today's world and stop planning for 15 years later 🙂

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1 hour ago, Quoll said:

It's about time that they started putting a no further stay clause on all visitor visas, just reading these boards with people who want to queue jump the system left right and centre.  The right thing to do is to put in your application for the CPV and make regular visits while you wait. But wait offshore like the folk who are doing it by the rules.

What do you think of people granting visas, are dump? don't they know about this? They also know by human rights they cannot stop family reunite hence they occasionally put restrictions based on circumstances.

How difficult is it for them to define and put 1 line restriction on every visit visa? think over it, if a common person like you can figure this out then the visa officer who specialises in this area won't know this 😄? 2 minutes silence for you 🙂 

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3 hours ago, LindaH27 said:

@Zeehayder are you aware that on an open forum like this that it is very likely immi also have access?? You may have set up a red flag!! 

I know but as stated a few times I am not doing anything illegal so why would I worry or hide? I am going by their defined rules and laws and checking out all possibilities with the community openly as I know my intentions. Now, do you allow me to explore options?  I am surprised to see negativity/anger on this forum, if people commenting on this forum becomes visa offices/judge or start defining law then I would say RIP for for that sector 😄 

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16 minutes ago, Zeehayder said:

I know but as stated a few times I am not doing anything illegal so why would I worry or hide? I am going by their defined rules and laws and checking out all possibilities with the community openly as I know my intentions. Now, do you allow me to explore options?  I am surprised to see negativity/anger on this forum, if people commenting on this forum becomes visa offices/judge or start defining law then I would say RIP for for that sector 😄 

If you bring your parents to Australia with the intention of not leaving even if their visa application is rejected, that is illegal. And that’s exactly what you just said you’re planning to do

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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4 hours ago, Marisawright said:

That is a disgraceful thing to say. You are saying that, even if there is no legal way for your parents to stay, you will seek to embarrass the Australian government into allowing them to stay anyway? You should be ashamed of yourself. 

Yes but perhaps not blame the individual for the rort that already passes as an immigration policy.

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1 minute ago, Marisawright said:

If you bring your parents to Australia with the intention of not leaving even if their visa application is rejected, that is illegal. And that’s exactly what you just said you’re planning to do

Again are you talking about 15 years later if their application is rejected based on not passing medical? Well you started predicting to which I have to reply so I simply replied back saying we will seek options available at that time and I stated HR in that.

I was born without the gift of protecting the future so I only go with things/options available at the current moment of life. You may be alive forever but I only go with short term goals 🙂 

Again if you cannot help stop responding here as your services are not required 🙂  

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