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Man Made Global Warming, is it to late.

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Intense heat waves have killed more than 100 people in India this summer and are predicted to worsen in coming years, creating a possible humanitarian crisis as large parts of the country potentially become too hot to be inhabitable.

Heat waves in India usually take place between March and July and abate once the monsoon rains arrive. But in recent years these hot spells have become more intense, more frequent and longer.

Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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We are expecting a cooler wetter summer than normal in Australia this year.

This is due to La Nina weather pattern and perfectly normal.

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Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

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1 minute ago, Parley said:

We are expecting a cooler wetter summer than normal in Australia this year.

This is due to La Nina weather pattern and perfectly normal.

Yup, and I am ticked off because it means I won't get the brighter colours on this year's crochet temperature blanket! 

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English weather for another summer.  “Not happy Jan”

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Wasn't La Nina affecting summer last year too?  I preferred it to previous summers.  Not as hot and lots of rain showers.  No flies either.  Everywhere lovely and green.

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There's a thick frost this morning. Not sure if it's man made or not.

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On 24/11/2021 at 09:24, Bulya said:

English weather for another summer.  “Not happy Jan”

It’s dam awful isn’t it 

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On 24/11/2021 at 11:02, Toots said:

Wasn't La Nina affecting summer last year too?  I preferred it to previous summers.  Not as hot and lots of rain showers.  No flies either.  Everywhere lovely and green.

Yes it was declared last summer as well, over last two years from my diary records temps are a lot lower now than 3/4 years ago.

in my area ( hunter / Newcastle) 

 

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On 24/11/2021 at 08:41, Parley said:

We are expecting a cooler wetter summer than normal in Australia this year.

This is due to La Nina weather pattern and perfectly normal.

Carful saying it’s normal Greta will be on to you 😂

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6 hours ago, Rallyman said:

It’s dam awful isn’t it 

You’re not wrong.  About time it got back to normal…

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Good job they changed the terminology from global warming to climate change. They can blame any weather event on it. Fires a couple of years back, world was on fire. This year, same places, massive amounts of rain, cooler and floods. Still climate change is to blame.

Snow in the UK in December, climate change.😆

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5 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

Good job they changed the terminology from global warming to climate change. They can blame any weather event on it. Fires a couple of years back, world was on fire. This year, same places, massive amounts of rain, cooler and floods. Still climate change is to blame.

Snow in the UK in December, climate change.😆

The jury is still out. Lately I read that climate change is causing bigger bushfires in Australia. I doubt it. Generally bushfires in Australia are caused by common and historic climate cycles, such as El Nino, La Nina impacting on the east of the continent and also by the Indian Ocean Dipole impacting on the west and South of the continent  Its been going on for hundreds of years but apparently its caused by conservative governments of all things. I mean......obviously. 

 In 1904, the poet Dorothea Mackellar made a key observation about extreme weather cycles when she wrote:

"I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of droughts and flooding rains"

117 years later and its still the same. There has been no change in terms of regular opposing cycles of "drought and flooding rains". The cycles of La Nina / El Nino, and the positive / negative Indian Ocean Dipole are normal and have been so for hundreds of years.

 At the moment, both the Indian Ocean Dipole and La Nina are impacting the continent with good rainfall. Lets hope that they persist through to March 2022 at least, which should keep bushfire activity at low yields by that time.  

  

 

Edited by Dusty Plains

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On 29/11/2021 at 06:13, simmo said:

There's a thick frost this morning. Not sure if it's man made or not.

It was so cold.  I had to scrape my windscreen and the car windows were frozen shut.  

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15 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

Good job they changed the terminology from global warming to climate change. They can blame any weather event on it. Fires a couple of years back, world was on fire. This year, same places, massive amounts of rain, cooler and floods. Still climate change is to blame.

Snow in the UK in December, climate change.😆

Yes, that's right.    Typical scientists, they didn't stop to think that their jargon before publishing their research. They should have known that the average person would be too lazy to read beyond the word "warming" and jump to the wrong conclusions.  

Go back and read the original research, when it was still called "global warming", and you'll see that they always said that the overall warming of the planet would cause extremes of weather, both hot and cold. Climate change is a consequence of global warming and was predicted.   

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

Yes, that's right.    Typical scientists, they didn't stop to think that their jargon before publishing their research. They should have known that the average person would be too lazy to read beyond the word "warming" and jump to the wrong conclusions.  

Go back and read the original research, when it was still called "global warming", and you'll see that they always said that the overall warming of the planet would cause extremes of weather, both hot and cold. Climate change is a consequence of global warming and was predicted.   

Basically what the planet has done for last 10 million years or so. 

extreme weather / climate hot  and cold , 

http://www.climate.gov/news-features/climate-qa/whats-hottest-earths-ever-been

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12 hours ago, Dusty Plains said:

The jury is still out. Lately I read that climate change is causing bigger bushfires in Australia. I doubt it. Generally bushfires in Australia are caused by common and historic climate cycles, such as El Nino, La Nina impacting on the east of the continent and also by the Indian Ocean Dipole impacting on the west and South of the continent  Its been going on for hundreds of years but apparently its caused by conservative governments of all things. I mean......obviously. 

 In 1904, the poet Dorothea Mackellar made a key observation about extreme weather cycles when she wrote:

"I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of droughts and flooding rains"

117 years later and its still the same. There has been no change in terms of regular opposing cycles of "drought and flooding rains". The cycles of La Nina / El Nino, and the positive / negative Indian Ocean Dipole are normal and have been so for hundreds of years.

 At the moment, both the Indian Ocean Dipole and La Nina are impacting the continent with good rainfall. Lets hope that they persist through to March 2022 at least, which should keep bushfire activity at low yields by that time.  

  

 

The one thing that has changed is the number of people living in the bush and fireprone areas. There were several fires here, most of them caused by arsonists. Obviously some are accidents, one guy using a grinder caused a massive fire.

The climate change people love the footage though and are still after your money by showing pictures of fire damaged koalas.

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2 hours ago, Rallyman said:

Basically what the planet has done for last 10 million years or so. 

extreme weather / climate hot  and cold , 

http://www.climate.gov/news-features/climate-qa/whats-hottest-earths-ever-been


Yes the earth has been much colder, much hotter, had much more CO2 in the atmosphere etc etc. it has long followed a cycle of cooling and warming as part of its natural processes and will do so for Millenia.

But that completely misses the point - the concern with climate change is not about whether the earth will survive (of course it will), it’s about how it will impact on human civilisation as it changes. As earth warms, weather processes change, some areas experience drought, some flooding, some become more hospitable and some become less hospitable. Normally this would happen over thousands of years, but the evidence shows this is happening much much faster than it would naturally (decades rather than thousands of years).

This gives us less time to adapt to the changes, to naturally transition to different farming areas, to adapt our towns and cities for extreme weather and rising sea levels. This puts our food security at risk, places human lives at risk from extreme weather events, impacts on housing and cities from sea incursion etc. We’ve seen mild signs of this but in 50 years we’ll see much more significant impact without action.

The narrative about climate change isn’t focussed on what’s happening right now, it’s about what will happen in the future. I think that’s why there’s so much debate, people look out the window and say “it’s fine, what’s the big deal”, they point to earths history and say “it’s been much warmer, oceans have been higher before, it’s all Natural processes”. But looking out the window doesn’t tell  us what it will be like in 50 years so it’s a non argument, and historical temperature fluctuations fail to recognise that human influence has caused this to change much much faster, and that humanity can only exist within a fairly narrow climate range.

So yes, earth will be fine and will heat and cool for Millenia. Climate change concern isn’t about the earth, it’s about humanity. Whether we’re worth saving is another debate altogether.

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15 hours ago, Dusty Plains said:

The jury is still out. Lately I read that climate change is causing bigger bushfires in Australia. I doubt it.

You may doubt it - but those whose job it is to research fire activity (and have been doing so for years) say that it is definitely happening.  And not just the researchers and academics:  the boots on the ground are saying so also.  People like the ex Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service with 40+ years firefighting experience who say the fire behaviour in the last few years is like nothing they saw before.

Not just bigger fires but in places where they haven't happened before - in tropical rainforest and in the temperate rain and high altitude forests of Tasmania with 1000 year old trees which, prior to 2016, had never been burnt because they were previously too wet to burn.

Quote

117 years later and its still the same.

It is not still the same.  Yes, those have always been features of this continent.  But those whose job it is to keep track of these events say, unequivocally, that such events are becoming more frequent and more extreme when they do occur.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Skani said:

You may doubt it - but those whose job it is to research fire activity (and have been doing so for years) say that it is definitely happening.  And not just the researchers and academics:  the boots on the ground are saying so also.  People like the ex Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service with 40+ years firefighting experience who say the fire behaviour in the last few years is like nothing they saw before.

Not just bigger fires but in places where they haven't happened before - in tropical rainforest and in the temperate rain and high altitude forests of Tasmania with 1000 year old trees which, prior to 2016, had never been burnt because they were previously too wet to burn.

It is not still the same.  Yes, those have always been features of this continent.  But those whose job it is to keep track of these events say, unequivocally, that such events are becoming more frequent and more extreme when they do occur.

 

 

Thanks for that. I still believe that the "jury is still out" in relation to simply choosing climate change as the main cause, even though there is no doubt that the historic climate cycles actually cause bushfires.  You might find that the previous commissioner of the RFS also agrees, see here:

https://www.theleader.com.au/story/7529227/la-nina-brings-double-whammy-risk-says-former-fire-chief/

The ex-Commissioner actually served 35 years. I served 37 years in another state fire service. 

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