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Nyxkat

We made it to Perth!

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2 hours ago, Nyxkat said:

I've not experienced this apparent pom initiation rite as yet, possibly because I'm careful and haven't spent a long time out in the direct sunlight yet or been in the sea.

I wear sunscreen and use the same bottle to re apply. I was told as a kid not to mix sunscreens but now I also know why! Thanks 😊

I also have very sun resistant skin. I'm still pale as all heck despite walking around Rockingham for a good hour yesterday, though I do use factor 30.

Haven't dared show my legs yet in case i blind anyone. Haha.

Lots of Aussies as fair as Poms these days. So don't worry they no longer feather and tar Poms just of the boat, as the expression went. It was decades back though, a dead giveway. 

A pasty body usually equated a newly arrived English person. 

But if you do want the overall sun

kissed glowing look, you could do worse that take the brood down to Swanbourne Beach. It's nude bathing.  Some great tans there as well.

Edited by Blue Flu

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13 minutes ago, Blue Flu said:

Lots of Aussies as fair as Poms these days.

That's very true.  I'm not sure what it's like in Perth, but in Sydney when we went to the beach, we could guarantee that all the people sunbathing on the beach were foreigners.  All the Aussies were looking for shade, unless they were on/in the water or playing sport.  

The Slip, Slop, Slap campaign was in full swing when I first arrived in Australia over 30 years ago, and Aussies now are very aware of the risks of skin cancer.   Sometimes I think they worry too much, as young parents go to such extremes to keep their little ones out of the sun that it's now causing Vitamin D deficiencies.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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39 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

That's very true.  I'm not sure what it's like in Perth, but in Sydney when we went to the beach, we could guarantee that all the people sunbathing on the beach were foreigners.  All the Aussies were looking for shade, unless they were on/in the water or playing sport.  

The Slip, Slop, Slap campaign was in full swing when I first arrived in Australia over 30 years ago, and Aussies now are very aware of the risks of skin cancer.   Sometimes I think they worry too much, as young parents go to such extremes to keep their little ones out of the sun that it's now causing Vitamin D deficiencies.  

Far too extreme in their parenting. For a nation of supposedly 'laid back' individuals (we know for the most part that is simply PR advertising) Aussies are very conservative on such matters. Well most maters really. Thing being many learn to relax and soak up the sun even in foreign parts , something I've noticed in many. (well some) Thing being of course if pre disposed to sin cancer , it doesn't take much at all to trigger it off. Probably sun exposure can be of benefit to prevent burn in Australian conditions. Not forgetting it is great for a host of things from joints, to heart and metal health to name but a few. 

The Slip Slop campaign started more like forty years ago., Great for keeping people inside the office and developing fear in two of Australia's prime attractions. The sun and beach. Let's face it a city like Perth has limited attractions outside of those two things.  

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46 minutes ago, Blue Flu said:

Thing being many learn to relax and soak up the sun even in foreign parts , something I've noticed in many. (well some) Thing being of course if pre disposed to sin cancer , it doesn't take much at all to trigger it off. Probably sun exposure can be of benefit to prevent burn in Australian conditions. Not forgetting it is great for a host of things from joints, to heart and metal health to name but a few. 

The Slip Slop campaign started more like forty years ago., Great for keeping people inside the office and developing fear in two of Australia's prime attractions. The sun and beach. Let's face it a city like Perth has limited attractions outside of those two things.  

Ah, it's all a conspiracy theory, right?   Wrong.  Simple science.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

That's very true.  I'm not sure what it's like in Perth, but in Sydney when we went to the beach, we could guarantee that all the people sunbathing on the beach were foreigners.  All the Aussies were looking for shade, unless they were on/in the water or playing sport.  

The Slip, Slop, Slap campaign was in full swing when I first arrived in Australia over 30 years ago, and Aussies now are very aware of the risks of skin cancer.   Sometimes I think they worry too much, as young parents go to such extremes to keep their little ones out of the sun that it's now causing Vitamin D deficiencies.  

I must be the typical new Aussie. I have a small skin cancer on my right nostril and will need plastic surgery in January. I recently had a full blood test and all factors were good except for one, namely that I was low in vitamin D. Weird. 

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1 hour ago, Blue Flu said:

Far too extreme in their parenting. For a nation of supposedly 'laid back' individuals (we know for the most part that is simply PR advertising) Aussies are very conservative on such matters. Well most maters really. Thing being many learn to relax and soak up the sun even in foreign parts , something I've noticed in many. (well some) Thing being of course if pre disposed to sin cancer , it doesn't take much at all to trigger it off. Probably sun exposure can be of benefit to prevent burn in Australian conditions. Not forgetting it is great for a host of things from joints, to heart and metal health to name but a few. 

The Slip Slop campaign started more like forty years ago., Great for keeping people inside the office and developing fear in two of Australia's prime attractions. The sun and beach. Let's face it a city like Perth has limited attractions outside of those two things.  

You've written in a different thread about bands and film festivals on at the moment and last night of the proms. Make your mind up, Perth has loads of things going on and the added bonus of the sun and beach.

Glorious Saturday and probably better yesterday. Me and the wife were at the beach for about 4 hours Saturday and me and the youngest about 5 yesterday. Not sunbathing though, rarely do that, out on the paddle board and surf ski or just swimming. My wife went to some markets at UWA yesterday, not my scene but she said they were very good and busy.

Factor 50 waterproof sunscreen is the go to. If you forget to apply and go to the beach just ask the lifeguards they always have some. Popular beaches like Scarbs, Cottesloe bottles are put out for the public. If you're ever out and forgot to apply there's usually free sunscreen somewhere. Very important for kids.

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44 minutes ago, Dusty Plains said:

I must be the typical new Aussie. I have a small skin cancer on my right nostril and will need plastic surgery in January. I recently had a full blood test and all factors were good except for one, namely that I was low in vitamin D. Weird. 

My wife had a skin cancer removed from her lleg when we'd been here about a month and has had a couple more removed from her back. All non malignant. The one on her leg had been there years and just about the first visit to a doc here he said he didn't like the look of it. Only looked like a small mole but they took a chunk out.

I think all the damage was done i our younger days in Spain, Portugal and Greece with no sunscreen and you hadn't got your moneys worth if you didn't get 8 hours in the sun.😆

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12 minutes ago, Paul1Perth said:

You've written in a different thread about bands and film festivals on at the moment and last night of the proms. Make your mind up, Perth has loads of things going on and the added bonus of the sun and beach.

Glorious Saturday and probably better yesterday. Me and the wife were at the beach for about 4 hours Saturday and me and the youngest about 5 yesterday. Not sunbathing though, rarely do that, out on the paddle board and surf ski or just swimming. My wife went to some markets at UWA yesterday, not my scene but she said they were very good and busy.

Factor 50 waterproof sunscreen is the go to. If you forget to apply and go to the beach just ask the lifeguards they always have some. Popular beaches like Scarbs, Cottesloe bottles are put out for the public. If you're ever out and forgot to apply there's usually free sunscreen somewhere. Very important for kids.

I was at the beach both days as well. Parking being dreadful, indeed impossible on Sunday at Cottesloe, so it was City Beach. Very pleased in fact that we took that option. One doesn't need to sun bathe though. I must have been a total of about eighty minutes in the sea over the course of the day and in fact turned quite brown without trying. 

Perth is basically beach and sun as i said. A film festival is a destruction as a a few music events . Those things happen in most any city of moderate size. It does not mean Perth is an exciting place, it means there are things to do, but weather and beach are what makes Perth well Perth. 

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2 hours ago, Dusty Plains said:

I must be the typical new Aussie. I have a small skin cancer on my right nostril and will need plastic surgery in January. I recently had a full blood test and all factors were good except for one, namely that I was low in vitamin D. Weird. 

My husband has just had a skin cancer on the tip of his nose removed recently and had plastic surgery. He looked as though he had gone a couple of rounds with Mike Tyson after, but recovered quickly. It’s important to use the oil on the scar afterwards, if you are advised to. 
All the best

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I was also told I was vitamin  D deficient! Apparently an age thing! I get plenty of sunlight all year out walking early with no sunscreen and plenty from food but I now need supplements.


So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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5 hours ago, rammygirl said:

I was also told I was vitamin  D deficient! Apparently an age thing! I get plenty of sunlight all year out walking early with no sunscreen and plenty from food but I now need supplements.

Same.  Nephrologist put me on a daily dose.  

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A day at the beach is very different in Australia compared to what Brits are used to.

A day at the beach will involve tents, shades, gallons of sunscreen, hats, sunnies, full body sun suits and usually some RoboCop pouncing on you to warn you if you expose an inch of skin.

IMO benidorm is better.

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14 hours ago, simmo said:

A day at the beach is very different in Australia compared to what Brits are used to.

A day at the beach will involve tents, shades, gallons of sunscreen, hats, sunnies, full body sun suits and usually some RoboCop pouncing on you to warn you if you expose an inch of skin.

IMO benidorm is better.

Not that different   Although it depends which beach.  For us easy to park, choice of surf or calm, not crowded. Plenty of people with just towels and good sunscreen. Most kids have rashies or sun suits but certainly not all adults.  I only wear mine if spending a lot of time in the water. I use factor 50 here but still used sunscreen and shades in UK /Spain. I would say that disabled access to beaches is better in Europe though, but toilet facilities are better here. 


So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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15 hours ago, simmo said:

A day at the beach is very different in Australia compared to what Brits are used to.

A day at the beach will involve tents, shades, gallons of sunscreen, hats, sunnies, full body sun suits and usually some RoboCop pouncing on you to warn you if you expose an inch of skin.

IMO benidorm is better.

Yes very different in manner, appearance and style. I prefer the term a day at the seaside, if talking England, and beach for Australia. To my thinking the seaside the beach is part of the package, but not its entirety. Often there are piers and shops and/or town not far away. 

One is sandy, the other more likely pebbles. But I've never experienced a RoboCop pouncing on me with regards to exposing skin . I take you mean warning against skin cancer? I go very brown and never once has this happened to me. But there does seem to be far more shades , parasols and sun protectors of various forms in evidence this year. 

Parking depending on beach often a problem. There's only a couple of beaches, I'd consider getting public transport to. Always wear a hat and sunglasses though. 

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15 hours ago, simmo said:

A day at the beach is very different in Australia compared to what Brits are used to.

A day at the beach will involve tents, shades, gallons of sunscreen, hats, sunnies, full body sun suits and usually some RoboCop pouncing on you to warn you if you expose an inch of skin.

IMO benidorm is better.

Tassie doesn't have such intense heat.   The last week it has been hovering around 25C.  Children wear those rashies.  The beaches at the seaside towns here remind me a bit of British beaches.  We are lucky as there are no crowds or parking problems.  You are thinking of city beaches in Australia Simmo.  No RoboCops pouncing on you here. 

I'm off for a swim before lunch.  Walk there, have a swim, shower, dry off in the sun, walk home.  
 

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16 hours ago, simmo said:

A day at the beach is very different in Australia compared to what Brits are used to.

A day at the beach will involve tents, shades, gallons of sunscreen, hats, sunnies, full body sun suits and usually some RoboCop pouncing on you to warn you if you expose an inch of skin.

IMO benidorm is better.

and the phenomenon called sand, something unheard of in England.

Luckily we don't have to cope with razor sharp pebbles slicing up our feet when enjoying a simple paddle.

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Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

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1 hour ago, Parley said:

and the phenomenon called sand, something unheard of in England.

Luckily we don't have to cope with razor sharp pebbles slicing up our feet when enjoying a simple paddle.

Don't exaggerate Parley.  Yes there are pebbly beaches but there are also many sandy beaches, not only in England but also in Wales and Scotland.

We have pebbly beaches here too especially on the north west coast.  Some pebbly, some all sand.  The east coast and many on the south coast of Tassie has many lovely sandy beaches. 

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47 minutes ago, Toots said:

Don't exaggerate Parley.  Yes there are pebbly beaches but there are also many sandy beaches, not only in England but also in Wales and Scotland.

Be fair, he did say "England", not Britain.   


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

Be fair, he did say "England", not Britain.   

The beaches in Yorkshire and Northumberland are all sandy, it was a great shock to me when I first saw a pebbly beach on the South Coast. 

Edited by Drumbeat
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1 hour ago, Drumbeat said:

The beaches in Yorkshire and Northumberland are all sandy, it was a great shock to me when I first saw a pebbly beach on the South Coast. 

Also sandy beaches in Devon, Cornwall, Dorset and Norfolk.

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4 minutes ago, Toots said:

Also sandy beaches in Devon, Cornwall, Dorset and Norfolk.

....although it depends on your definition of sand.   If you're used to the pale, fine sands of the West Coast of Scotland, you'll find the Dorset sand coarse and uninviting.   Mind you, you can actually make sandcastles that stay up.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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3 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

....although it depends on your definition of sand.   If you're used to the pale, fine sands of the West Coast of Scotland, you'll find the Dorset sand coarse and uninviting.   Mind you, you can actually make sandcastles that stay up.  

The tide drops here a couple of times a day - not far out but far enough to leave plenty of firm, damp sand - excellent for sand castle building.  😁  lots of kids play cricket on it and it's better for walking and running on than fine, soft sand.

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1 hour ago, Toots said:

Also sandy beaches in Devon, Cornwall, Dorset and Norfolk.

And Kent and Essex..

 

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