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Dan Not Dale

Full English Fry Up

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1 hour ago, Toots said:

I recall a market place in a large town in Belgium selling just about everything you can think of. ¬†There were a few mares and foals with there hooves painted silver. ¬†They were to be sold as meat - even the foals. ¬†ūüė®

Foals would have been a bit more tender.ūü§≠

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Wanderer Returns said:

Staffordshire¬†. We used to have them in our Caravan in Wetton - on the Derbyshire/Staffordshire¬†border ūüôā¬†

Good man. ūüôŹ

My hubby makes his own now. A breakfast isn't complete without them. The family go crazy for them. 

Edited by HappyHeart
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5 hours ago, Parley said:

Thank God my mum never made black pudding and i have never tried it. She was Australian mind so the thought was gross to her too.

I hated liver at school too. I never understand why the English like to eat internal organs of animals like liver, kidney, brains, tripe, blood etc.

Simply disgusting to me. I would vomit all over the plate if forced to eat it.

You best stick to chicken parmi then ūüĎĆūüôą

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The perfect brekkie. 

Staffordshire oatcakes with bacon and cheese. Black pudding. Fried tomato. Maybe an Irish pork sausage. Plus or minus fried egg. 

 

If no oatcakes 

Bacon, sausage, tomato, eggs, wilted spinach, black pudding. Hold the beans. 

I also like adding pan seared asparagus and swapping bacon for smoked salmon. 

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On 09/07/2021 at 14:41, HappyHeart said:

Good man. ūüôŹ

My hubby makes his own now. A breakfast isn't complete without them. The family go crazy for them. 

Ar'd goo a long wee fer a coupler Staffy cher wrote cakes.

I've tried making them but without much success ... do you think he'd share his recipe?  And what does he cook them on?  In the shops they use a kind of convex griddle.

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12 minutes ago, GrandpaGrumble said:

Ar'd goo a long wee fer a coupler Staffy cher wrote cakes.

I've tried making them but without much success ... do you think he'd share his recipe?  And what does he cook them on?  In the shops they use a kind of convex griddle.

He cooks them in a frying pan. Time consuming but tried on the bbq flat plate and not as successful. 
I’ll dig out the recipe. I think he tweaks it a bit though. Has to be thin enough to get them just right. I tried once but too much faff. It’s his baby. 
 

Good try at the accent btwūü§£

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11 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

He cooks them in a frying pan. Time consuming but tried on the bbq flat plate and not as successful. 
I’ll dig out the recipe. I think he tweaks it a bit though. Has to be thin enough to get them just right. I tried once but too much faff. It’s his baby. 
 

Good try at the accent btwūü§£

Just read "quartered safe out here" by George McDonald Fraser. He really brings those northern accents to life. It was a good read too.


Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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15 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

He cooks them in a frying pan. Time consuming but tried on the bbq flat plate and not as successful. 
I’ll dig out the recipe. I think he tweaks it a bit though. Has to be thin enough to get them just right. I tried once but too much faff. It’s his baby. 

That would be great (but no worries if not of course).  The tweaks are probably the most important bit!

Oatcakes were the first solid food my nipper ate.

15 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

Good try at the accent btwūü§£

Just coe me Owd Grandad Piggott.

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8 minutes ago, GrandpaGrumble said:

That would be great (but no worries if not of course).  The tweaks are probably the most important bit!

Oatcakes were the first solid food my nipper ate.

Just coe me Owd Grandad Piggott.

It’s a rite of passage for the little uns. Are you from Staffs? 

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4 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

It’s a rite of passage for the little uns. Are you from Staffs? 

Yes, from the Moorlands.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, GrandpaGrumble said:

Yes, from the Moorlands.


 

These are some he made for Christmas. We always have oatcakes for Christmas Eve brunch. This is the recipe he uses most often I think. 

BEB36A7F-CA12-40E1-86B9-6638B4AB0841.jpeg

C9DB7B08-45CC-4287-BB88-49ADD21567A3.jpeg

Edited by HappyHeart
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On 19/07/2021 at 10:32, GrandpaGrumble said:

That would be great (but no worries if not of course).  The tweaks are probably the most important bit!

Oatcakes were the first solid food my nipper ate.

Just coe me Owd Grandad Piggott.

May un Mar lady 

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On 20/07/2021 at 06:32, GrandpaGrumble said:

They definitely look like the real thing, I'll give it a go.  Many thanks!

He's going to have to make oatcakes tomorrow now.....

The best thing to come out of the Potteries  Poveys were our favourite. Or Tunstall market ones. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, HappyHeart said:

He's going to have to make oatcakes tomorrow now.....

The best thing to come out of the Potteries  Poveys were our favourite. Or Tunstall market ones. 

I'm impressed. I have never heard of it but that breakfast seems to be quite healthy.  Are they oat pancakes?

Edited by Dusty Plains

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On 19/07/2021 at 21:52, HappyHeart said:


 

These are some he made for Christmas. We always have oatcakes for Christmas Eve brunch. This is the recipe he uses most often I think. 

BEB36A7F-CA12-40E1-86B9-6638B4AB0841.jpeg

C9DB7B08-45CC-4287-BB88-49ADD21567A3.jpeg

So they're pancakes?   Scottish oatcakes are biscuits.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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38 minutes ago, Dusty Plains said:

I'm impressed. I have never heard of it but that breakfast seems to be quite healthy.  Are they oat pancakes?

Pretty much yes. Food of the Gods 

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19 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

So they're pancakes?   Scottish oatcakes are biscuits.

No, they're oatcakes. A leavened oat wrap. 

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9 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

No, they're oatcakes. A leavened oat wrap. 

I know they’re called oatcakes but their shape is a pancake or wrap, not a cake or biscuit. They look interesting 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I know they’re called oatcakes but their shape is a pancake or wrap, not a cake or biscuit. They look interesting 

They are delicious. Made to go with bacon and cheese, sausage and cheese, cheese and tomato, just cheese or any savoury combo you like. I like to keep mine simple. Good smoked bacon and cheese.

Historically there waa a hole in the wall oatcake shop baking fresh oatcakes (and pikelets) on many a street corner in Stoke on Trent and surrounds. Sadly not many left but still a massive thing for people from Staffordshire. A traditional breakfast item. 

Some people try to fancy them up and use sweet ingredients but that's not for me. 

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On 22/07/2021 at 20:35, HappyHeart said:

May un Mar lady 

Rate good!  I've still got the 'Arfur Tow Crate' booklets I bought in the 70s.

 

On 22/07/2021 at 20:39, HappyHeart said:

He's going to have to make oatcakes tomorrow now.....

The best thing to come out of the Potteries  Poveys were our favourite. Or Tunstall market ones. 

I'll have a go as well soon, but unfortunately I've kenched my thumb so no fancy cooking for a few weeks.

 

On 23/07/2021 at 10:48, HappyHeart said:

They are delicious. Made to go with bacon and cheese, sausage and cheese, cheese and tomato, just cheese or any savoury combo you like. I like to keep mine simple. Good smoked bacon and cheese.

Historically there waa a hole in the wall oatcake shop baking fresh oatcakes (and pikelets) on many a street corner in Stoke on Trent and surrounds. Sadly not many left but still a massive thing for people from Staffordshire. A traditional breakfast item. 

Some people try to fancy them up and use sweet ingredients but that's not for me. 

Yes, the bacon/cheese/sausage combo is the way to go, though I have been known to use up left over ones with tomato and olive oil.  Agreed, definitely not for sweet things!

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On 09/07/2021 at 00:14, Parley said:

Thank God my mum never made black pudding and i have never tried it. She was Australian mind so the thought was gross to her too.

I hated liver at school too. I never understand why the English like to eat internal organs of animals like liver, kidney, brains, tripe, blood etc.

Simply disgusting to me. I would vomit all over the plate if forced to eat it.

Actually, black pudding is really nice.

Not just a bit nice, but really nice.

You should try it. Really no different to any other sausage. Just don't think about it.

Not a great fan of liver, but a good steak and kidney pie is to die for.

My mother in law used to eat soft cod roe till I told her it was sperm. She didn't seem as keen after that, even though she'd eaten it all her life.

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Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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On 09/07/2021 at 13:12, Paul1Perth said:

Foals would have been a bit more tender.ūü§≠

Used to compete of there a fair bit and when we went to get a steak  it was always horse meat , we then clicked on and you had to ask for beef steak at twice the price . 

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2 hours ago, Rallyman said:

Used to compete of there a fair bit and when we went to get a steak  it was always horse meat , we then clicked on and you had to ask for beef steak at twice the price . 

Yep, that'll be right.   When you learn foreign languages, you discover that there are lots of words that look the same but mean something different. 

In French, "steak" just means a slab of meat from an animal, any animal.  If you want steak from a cow, it's "bifteck".  So they weren't trying to fool you.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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