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Red Rose

Anti-social driving & road rage

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How do you deal with anti social driving, such as tailgating, dangerous overtaking etc, do you ever react to it or keep calm and carry on?!?

Also who here has a dash cam? I have invested in a front one, and wonder if a rear one is worth it or not. Views? 

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Laugh and blow them a kiss.

It took me a week of driving in AUS and then I bought front facing dash cam as the levels of incompetence on display were staggering - and still are 2 years later.

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18 hours ago, Red Rose said:

How do you deal with anti social driving, such as tailgating, dangerous overtaking etc, do you ever react to it or keep calm and carry on?!?

Also who here has a dash cam? I have invested in a front one, and wonder if a rear one is worth it or not. Views? 

Just slow down 

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28 minutes ago, unzippy said:

Laugh and blow them a kiss.

It took me a week of driving in AUS and then I bought front facing dash cam as the levels of incompetence on display were staggering - and still are 2 years later.

Do you find drivers in Tasmania any better?  I thought the drivers were much better around Hobart but in the area I live the majority of the drivers are dreadful.  Devonport is a town of roundabouts and it would appear that a helluva lot of the local drivers haven't a clue how to approach them.  Bluddy dangerous in some instances.  On the whole they all drive far too fast and are very pushy.

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18 hours ago, Red Rose said:

How do you deal with anti social driving, such as tailgating, dangerous overtaking etc, do you ever react to it or keep calm and carry on?!?

Also who here has a dash cam? I have invested in a front one, and wonder if a rear one is worth it or not. Views? 

I don't react just swear a bit under my breath and try to keep calm and carry on.  A dash cam is a very good idea.

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1 hour ago, Rallyman said:

Just slow down 

Exactly what I do 

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If someone is on my bumper I slow right down. 

If someone cuts me up I get on my horn and swear but don't change speed. You generally catch up with them down the road. 

I generally stay calm. I don't have a dash cam. 

My husband goes bonkers and that level of stress is definitely not good for you. 

I let people in if they're changing lanes last minute etc.

Some complete moron came from.behind me on the slip road the other week, undertook me as I was actually merging causing me to slam my brakes on. What sort of dick move is that?? You wait your bloody turn. I was doing near to 100 to match the speed of the traffic so there's no excuse. Idiotic driving. 

I just try to concentrate on my own driving.

 

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Perth used to have a reputation for bad driving, with merging being a particular issue, however I don't recall too much agro when I was there. The slowing down is not a bad idea for tailgaters, but I dunno that could wind them up even more! 

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22 hours ago, Red Rose said:

How do you deal with anti social driving, such as tailgating, dangerous overtaking etc, do you ever react to it or keep calm and carry on?!?

Also who here has a dash cam? I have invested in a front one, and wonder if a rear one is worth it or not. Views? 

Some may not believe this but about a year ago I actually had a fist fight with some bloke who chased me up the A2 and tried to ram me off the road.  I pulled up at the  Dartford tunnel roundabout and he had got out of his car and was charging towards me. Instinct kicked in and I got out and met me half way.  He adopted a boxing stance so I thought I'm not going to wait for him to hit me so I gave him a cracking right hook and he went on his arse.  Unfortunately the right hook isn't what it was and he got straight up and we ended up rolling about on the tarmac.  I'm early 50s for god's sake.  I got home and the misses gave me an almighty rollicking. Thinking back I was a fool. The roundabout was the next one to the one where Kenny know stabbed that young bloke to death, what if he had a knife?, What if someone caught it on a dashcam and it ended up all over social media? What if one of my work colleagues saw it?, What if he hit his head and didn't get up?

I was stupid I know. But I've thought about it and calmed down a lot.

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I drive very defensively and don’t trust any drivers on the road anymore. If someone is tailgating I ignore them and leave an overly large gap from the car in front so I have space to brake slowly, to avoid having to slam on the brakes and risk the tailgater hitting me. 

I don’t let it bother me but there have been times I wished I had an LED display/screen on the rear window to write ‘nice’ messages to drivers close behind. I don’t think (most of the time) the tailgating is aggressive driving but rather just very bad driving without thought of the dangers.

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:evilface_frowning_s

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Posted (edited)

I tend to drive now with cruise control. I adjust my speed with cruise control, and have my foot hovering over the brake. Most cars seem to use cruise control now, and it makes driving much easier. I'm not sure how that style of driving would work in Australia. Tailgating me probably wouldn't be a good idea, as I can stop very quickly.

I have a dash cam and have reported drivers to their employers, but not to police. I always find it strange that someone would drive dangerously with their details on the van 

I used to drive alot, and you learn how your route works. I had a Hyundai i10, which was pretty quick off the take off, although it lacked power at speed.

But I don't drive much nowadays. I was taking more and more chances, and it was only a matter of time.

Edited by newjez

Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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Posted (edited)

The utterance "wanker!" is in abundance when I'm driving, and is sometimes used in conjunction with the illustrative hand gesture. 😀

My biggest annoyance is how so many drivers don't close up at traffic lights or they slow down on approaching them on red thereby preventing folk from accessing filter lanes. It's as if by some miracle this action will get the lights to magically turn green thereby avoiding the hard work of having to change gear up or down or tax oneself by having to press the brake and clutch pedal, shift into neutral and apply hand brake! I think the Australian penchant for not closing up is a deliberate attempt to prevent other folk from accessing left or right filter lanes at lights and I'm beginning to think that it's so prevalent that it must somehow be a genetic predisposition 😡

Edited by Johndoe

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14 minutes ago, Johndoe said:

The utterance "wanker!" is in abundance when I'm driving, and is sometimes used in conjunction with the illustrative hand gesture. 😀

My biggest annoyance is how so many drivers don't close up at traffic lights or they slow down on approaching them on red thereby preventing folk from accessing filter lanes. It's as if by some miracle this action will get the lights to magically turn green thereby avoiding the hard work of having to change gear up or down or tax oneself by having to press the brake and clutch pedal, shift into neutral and apply hand brake! I think the Australian penchant for not closing up is a deliberate attempt to prevent other folk from accessing left or right filter lanes at lights and I'm beginning to think that it's so prevalent that it must somehow be a genetic predisposition 😡

I’ll think you’ll find that is how people are taught to drive now.  Leaving enough space when stationary to see “tyres and tarmac”. The reason being that it leaves wriggle room in an emergency, for example an emergency vehicle trying to get through. Slowing for a red light is also sensible.  You need to relax and be patient.

 

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9 minutes ago, rammygirl said:

I’ll think you’ll find that is how people are taught to drive now.  Leaving enough space when stationary to see “tyres and tarmac”.

That's exactly what we were taught in defensive driving courses:  the reason given was  "wriggle room" and less damage if you were rear-ended.  

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I've noticed quite a few drivers using their phones while stopped at the lights so much they miss the change of lights. I was stopped next to one who was in the right turn lane and by the time they'd looked up had missed their turn. Mind you so did the cars behind them.

On a broader note I don't understand why aggressive driving isn't addressed here in a road safety campaign, something that gets at the psychology of the behaviour.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, rammygirl said:

I’ll think you’ll find that is how people are taught to drive now.  Leaving enough space when stationary to see “tyres and tarmac”. The reason being that it leaves wriggle room in an emergency, for example an emergency vehicle trying to get through. Slowing for a red light is also sensible.  You need to relax and be patient.

 

Yes, I'm fully aware of leaving room to manouvre to accommodate emergency vehicles, but I'm talking about the folk who can fit a bus between them and the vehicle in front and there's slowing, and then there's "slowing" 🙄. A red light should be approached at a speed no different than approaching any stationary object with the ability to brake correctly. What I'm talking about is folk who slow to a crawl, often more than 50 metres away, hoping the lights will change before they reach them, thereby preventing other folk from accessing filter lanes that are invariably showing green.

Edited by Johndoe

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31 minutes ago, Johndoe said:

. It's as if by some miracle this action will get the lights to magically turn green thereby avoiding the hard work of having to change gear up or down or tax oneself by having to press the brake and clutch pedal, shift into neutral and apply hand brake! I think the Australian penchant for not closing up is a deliberate attempt to prevent other folk from accessing left or right filter lanes at lights and I'm beginning to think that it's so prevalent that it must somehow be a genetic predisposition 😡

Nah...so many cars these days are automatic - gear changing wouldn't be a reason.  I'd probably be one of those drivers you'd be swearing at - it's the way I was taught to drive.  Look ahead, anticipate - reinforced often by  a cautious motorbike rider husband - and,  where possible, use slow/accelerate driving mode  as more economical than stop/start.   And, as mentioned above, we were taught to leave some roadway visible in front when stopped.    That said, it's much less of an issue in lower traffic volumes here than in John Doe Land.   You'll be pleased to know I won't be driving in Brisbane - ever!  😉

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5 hours ago, newjez said:

I tend to drive now with cruise control.

I did the same for a long time, I thought it was a great idea.  Then my cruise control jammed at 100kmh on the motorway and nearly killed me.  I've never used it since.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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18 hours ago, Toots said:

Do you find drivers in Tasmania any better?  I thought the drivers were much better around Hobart but in the area I live the majority of the drivers are dreadful.  Devonport is a town of roundabouts and it would appear that a helluva lot of the local drivers haven't a clue how to approach them.  Bluddy dangerous in some instances.  On the whole they all drive far too fast and are very pushy.

Yep, better.  But only a little😉  Well, for Hobart and surrounds, I've not spent too much time oop north.

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I'm definitely all for just letting things go and not letting someone else actions increase my blood pressure. It all comes down to ego and it's important to recognise that and let go, accepting that in a few minutes it will all be forgotten about. 

 I find the driving varies significantly between the big cities and the regional areas here, but the interesting point about people speeding up to not let you in at filter lane is frustrating, you have to learn quickly to be in the right lane at the right time. 

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21 minutes ago, CaptainR said:


I find the driving varies significantly between the big cities and the regional areas here, but the interesting point about people speeding up to not let you in at filter lane is frustrating, you have to learn quickly to be in the right lane at the right time. 

However a lot of drivers overtake on the left hand side even when there is an obvious queue.

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Watch The Worst UK drivers or UK Dash Cameras - Compilation on YouTube and you’ll see how really bad thinks can get…

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2 hours ago, Melbpom said:

However a lot of drivers overtake on the left hand side even when there is an obvious queue.

It's never been that clear to me whether undertaking is illegal or not. I don't do it because it's generally frowned upon (in the UK anyway) but if the police saw you do it on a dual carriageway I'm not sure whether they could do anything about it. 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Melbpom said:

However a lot of drivers overtake on the left hand side even when there is an obvious queue.

Well yes, it does happen, though in my experience, very rarely.  Strange that all of the anecdotes on here about bad driving. I travelled 80km to work and 80km back again every work day for 20 years, mostly on motorways, highways, major roads and rat runs, in order to avoid traffic. Yes there was the odd idiot but generally I have rarely encountered bad driving within the general daily mix of traffic over that time.     

Edited by Dusty Plains
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On 01/06/2021 at 19:47, Toots said:

I don't react just swear a bit under my breath and try to keep calm and carry on.  A dash cam is a very good idea.

Love to know some Scottish swear words...Are they the same as Yorkshire ones? Hmmm?

Cheers, Bobj.

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