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4 hours ago, HappyHeart said:

Crisps and chips. I would never ask for a serve of 'hot chips' 

I've only ever heard people ask for 'chips' in chip shops.  As Parley says, they're not going to think you're asking for a bag of crisps.

They did have a chuckle when I asked for tomato 'ketchup' though - said they hadn't heard that one for years.  And I still have to stop myself from asking for potato 'fritters' instead of scallops.

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57 minutes ago, GrandpaGrumble said:

I've only ever heard people ask for 'chips' in chip shops.  As Parley says, they're not going to think you're asking for a bag of crisps.

They did have a chuckle when I asked for tomato 'ketchup' though - said they hadn't heard that one for years.  And I still have to stop myself from asking for potato 'fritters' instead of scallops.

I just ask for wedges.  Chips are so common..

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I grew up in Victoria and have always used grey lead to distinguish graphite pencils from coloured/colouring pencils - my parents and school teachers did too.  I didn't realise it was an uncommon thing outside my region and/or generation. 

https://www.officecorporate.com.au/grey-lead-graphite/

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30 minutes ago, AussieMum said:

I grew up in Victoria and have always used grey lead to distinguish graphite pencils from coloured/colouring pencils - my parents and school teachers did too.  I didn't realise it was an uncommon thing outside my region and/or generation. 

That's really interesting.  I think I could count on one hand, the number of times in my life when I've had to use the words "graphite pencil".  To me, when someone says, "pencil", they mean a graphite pencil, so there's no need to say so.  A coloured/colouring pencil is differentiated by their name.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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39 minutes ago, AussieMum said:

I grew up in Victoria and have always used grey lead to distinguish graphite pencils from coloured/colouring pencils - my parents and school teachers did too.  I didn't realise it was an uncommon thing outside my region and/or generation. 

https://www.officecorporate.com.au/grey-lead-graphite/

Must be a Victorian thing.  Our sons went to school  in Sydney and used pencils, crayons, textas (felt tips) or pens.  Never heard  the grey lead terminology for a pencil.

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52 minutes ago, AussieMum said:

I grew up in Victoria and have always used grey lead to distinguish graphite pencils from coloured/colouring pencils - my parents and school teachers did too.  I didn't realise it was an uncommon thing outside my region and/or generation. 

https://www.officecorporate.com.au/grey-lead-graphite/

Every item has pencil in the name ? or am i missing something ?


I want it all, and I want it now.

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18 minutes ago, Parley said:

Every item has pencil in the name ? or am i missing something ?

So would you say "graphite pencil" if you wanted someone to pass you one from a pot that had a mixture of both types of pencils in it?  Or just "pencil" and there'd be a common understanding of what you meant because you didn't specify a coloured pencil?

Especially in early years primary when drawing and colouring in throughout the day is common and pens aren't used for writing yet, I remember often being told things like "fill out the test in grey lead" or "don't bring your whole pencil case on the excursion, you just need a couple of grey leads".

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2 minutes ago, AussieMum said:

So would you say "graphite pencil" if you wanted someone to pass you one from a pot that had a mixture of both types of pencils in it?  Or just "pencil" and there'd be a common understanding of what you meant because you didn't specify a coloured pencil?

Especially in early years primary when drawing and colouring in throughout the day is common and pens aren't used for writing yet, I remember often being told things like "fill out the test in grey lead" or "don't bring your whole pencil case on the excursion, you just need a couple of grey leads".

I would just say pencil. but if it is kids who are using coloured pencils for colouring then i can understand it.

We used to refer to HB pencils and there were some other types.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, AussieMum said:

So would you say "graphite pencil" if you wanted someone to pass you one from a pot that had a mixture of both types of pencils in it?  Or just "pencil" and there'd be a common understanding of what you meant because you didn't specify a coloured pencil?

Just “pencil”. But tbh I don’t remember using coloured pencils at primary school. I had a set at home but at school we used crayons for colouring in

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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7 hours ago, newjez said:

When we had our UK extension I told the builders there were a load of cool drinks in the esky. They just gave me a blank look.

The kiwis call them a chilly bin.

Esky is actually a brand name

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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3 hours ago, Parley said:

The kiwis call them a chilly bin.

Esky is actually a brand name

We call them cool boxes. I didn’t know Esky was the brand name.  We do exactly the same with Hoovers.  It’s just the brand name but everyone calls their ‘vacuum’ a hoover. 

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Thermos is another one where the brand name is used for all varieties.

I want to know if people in England say Maccas for McDonalds.

 


I want it all, and I want it now.

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In England it is Maccie D’s or just plain McDonalds. Never heard anyone say Maccas in UK. 

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So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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Same for Stove for an oven. In the UK we actually owned a Stove brand cooker once.


So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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16 minutes ago, rammygirl said:

Same for Stove for an oven. In the UK we actually owned a Stove brand cooker once.

Think the stove is only the standalone cooker with the gas hotplates on top ? An oven in the wall isn't normally called a stove.

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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15 hours ago, AussieMum said:

So would you say "graphite pencil" if you wanted someone to pass you one from a pot that had a mixture of both types of pencils in it?  .....I remember often being told things like "fill out the test in grey lead" 

I've never heard  "grey lead" or "graphite pencil"  used in Australia.  Thinking back to my pencil using days it was always a "black lead pencil" if distinguishing from coloured pencils.

 

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9 hours ago, Parley said:

Thermos is another one where the brand name is used for all varieties.

I want to know if people in England say Maccas for McDonalds.

 

Usually just McDonald’s but some say Maccie D

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7 hours ago, Skani said:

I've never heard  "grey lead" or "graphite pencil"  used in Australia.  Thinking back to my pencil using days it was always a "black lead pencil" if distinguishing from coloured pencils.

 

I asked my DH what he would have called them and he said the same thing - he's Victorian.

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1 hour ago, Tulip1 said:

Usually just McDonald’s but some say Maccie D

Yes that’s what we called it when in uk

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I'm sure I have one of William Shakespeare's pencils. He used to chew the end, so I don't know if it's a 2B or not 2B

 

Cheers, Bobj.

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It still amuses me that everything is shortened here.  Even in formal news they still refer to pollies, firies and schoolies.  Our local Advertiser is always The Tizer. Even the Salvation Army are now officially Salvos here.

The odd vowel still catches us out.  Son took guitar in for a replacement nut, guy looked confused until son showed him.  “Oh you mean the Nat “ 🙄


So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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On 13/05/2021 at 18:21, Marisawright said:

Just “pencil”. But tbh I don’t remember using coloured pencils at primary school. I had a set at home but at school we used crayons for colouring in

Pencil crayons for us 🙂

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12 hours ago, Canada2Australia said:

Pencil crayons for us 🙂

1940's, chalk crayons with a slate and duster.

Cheers, Bobj.

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