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It gets quite interesting with our Kiwi friends across the ditch, or "the dutch" according to kiwi vernacular. Conversations between Aussies and in New Zealanders tend to be a vowel extravaganza, with "i' and "e" being exchanged with gay abandon. The vowels are often reversed.

For instance, when my daughters were in High School their school hosted other high school students from Invercargill NZ, from way down the south of the South Island where the accent is especially thick and rich. We hosted one girl and after a few days she was a little homesick and called her family back in NZ, on the old landline phone and the conversation went like this:

"No,  its about Sex here at the moment" (NZ=Six) she said, and, "I have just got up after SEX" ( NZ=Six). I thought OMG, I'm going to be locked up. I'm glad I did not tell them that I was going to spend the morning outside oiling my "dEck".     

Edited by Dusty Plains

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6 hours ago, newjez said:

Because that's what it is?

So it is!

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16 hours ago, newjez said:

Up North of England they pronounce bus, castle, bath etc very differently than the south.

They can barely speak English up North 

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And just as interesting as the different pronunciations of words are the different names used in Australia.  I always liked doona instead of duvet but struggled with greylead instead of pencil, and chips instead of crisps is just confusing.  Clarifying the latter by adding potato chips always made me ask what the other chips were made from.

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16 minutes ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

And just as interesting as the different pronunciations of words are the different names used in Australia.  I always liked doona instead of duvet but struggled with greylead instead of pencil, and chips instead of crisps is just confusing.  Clarifying the latter by adding potato chips always made me ask what the other chips were made from.

....but just like the UK, those names vary across the country too.   I've lived in NSW and Victoria and never heard a pencil called a greylead.  I've never heard anyone say "potato chips" either.  "Chips" are crisps.  "Hot chips" are chips.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

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I taught in Bendigo Victoria for 10 years and all the students called pencils greyleads.  Crisps were called chips but when I queried how you knew whether it was crisps or chips in the English sense the kids would say potato chips.  They also called their PE jerseys gurnseys which made me laugh.

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6 hours ago, Dusty Plains said:

It gets quite interesting with our Kiwi friends across the ditch, or "the dutch" according to kiwi vernacular. Conversations between Aussies and in New Zealanders tend to be a vowel extravaganza, with "i' and "e" being exchanged with gay abandon. The vowels are often reversed.

For instance, when my daughters were in High School their school hosted other high school students from Invercargill NZ, from way down the south of the South Island where the accent is especially thick and rich. We hosted one girl and after a few days she was a little homesick and called her family back in NZ, on the old landline phone and the conversation went like this:

"No,  its about Sex here at the moment" (NZ=Six) she said, and, "I have just got up after SEX" ( NZ=Six). I thought OMG, I'm going to be locked up. I'm glad I did not tell them that I was going to spend the morning outside oiling my "dEck".     

I have a friend who is from NZ.  She pronounces her e’s as i’s. You don’t sit at a desk, you sit at a disk. 

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6 hours ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

And just as interesting as the different pronunciations of words are the different names used in Australia.  I always liked doona instead of duvet but struggled with greylead instead of pencil, and chips instead of crisps is just confusing.  Clarifying the latter by adding potato chips always made me ask what the other chips were made from.

OMG I’ll have to tell my kids pencil is greylead? Really is that true? Thank God adults mainly use pens.

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3 hours ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

I taught in Bendigo Victoria for 10 years and all the students called pencils greyleads.  Crisps were called chips but when I queried how you knew whether it was crisps or chips in the English sense the kids would say potato chips.  They also called their PE jerseys gurnseys which made me laugh.

Potato chips and hot chips is how you distinguish them (my husband likes to clarify, he is from NZ)

And I know it’s a kiwi word but who on earth came up with Jandals?!

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7 hours ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

And just as interesting as the different pronunciations of words are the different names used in Australia.  I always liked doona instead of duvet but struggled with greylead instead of pencil, and chips instead of crisps is just confusing.  Clarifying the latter by adding potato chips always made me ask what the other chips were made from.

More than half a century  here and spent time in every state/territory and I’ve never heard of greylead.  Always called a pencil.  As for the other it’s perfectly logical, chips or hot chips.  

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10 hours ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

And just as interesting as the different pronunciations of words are the different names used in Australia.  I always liked doona instead of duvet but struggled with greylead instead of pencil, and chips instead of crisps is just confusing.  Clarifying the latter by adding potato chips always made me ask what the other chips were made from.

We say pencil in Australia.

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10 hours ago, Marisawright said:

....but just like the UK, those names vary across the country too.   I've lived in NSW and Victoria and never heard a pencil called a greylead.  I've never heard anyone say "potato chips" either.  "Chips" are crisps.  "Hot chips" are chips.  

If your in a fish and chip shop they know what sort of chips you are talking about.

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I always think Boris Johnson sounds a bit funny. Just his slightly posh turn of phrase.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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10 hours ago, Marisawright said:

....but just like the UK, those names vary across the country too.   I've lived in NSW and Victoria and never heard a pencil called a greylead.  I've never heard anyone say "potato chips" either.  "Chips" are crisps.  "Hot chips" are chips.  

In QLD its the same,  pencil, chips and hot chips . Ive never heard of a greylead.

Felt tips being called textas was one that confused me at first, though,lol

 Cal x

 

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7 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

I have a friend who is from NZ.  She pronounces her e’s as i’s. You don’t sit at a desk, you sit at a disk. 

Years ago i asked my NZ friend if she had seen where our boys were.  Her answer was "the kuds are in the kutchen".  

 

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Crisps and chips. I would never ask for a serve of 'hot chips' 

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1 hour ago, Parley said:

We say pencil in Australia.

And we always have 

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11 hours ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

And just as interesting as the different pronunciations of words are the different names used in Australia. 

When I started school in NSW we carried our school things in a "port",   then I moved to Tasmania where it was a "case".  (This was in the days before backpacks).  In NSW we swam in "swimmers"'  in Tassie it is "bathers";  prccessed meat was Belgium in NSW,  Devon in Tas,,   fritz in South Australia IIRC?    Fried potato  is a "potato cake"  in Tas., a "potato scallop" in some other places in Oz (scallops are shellfish in Tas.).  In  Tas. a laundry tub was a  (pronounced)  "troe" (trough), though that one may be disappearing nowadays

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24 minutes ago, Toots said:

Years ago i asked my NZ friend if she had seen where our boys were.  Her answer was "the kuds are in the kutchen".  

 

 

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29 minutes ago, HappyHeart said:

Crisps and chips. I would never ask for a serve of 'hot chips' 

You're in Perth, yes?  Is that what they say in Perth or just you sticking determinedly to the British words for them?

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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5 hours ago, Coxy7 said:

OMG I’ll have to tell my kids pencil is greylead? Really is that true? Thank God adults mainly use pens.

First, check that it applies in the state you're going to.   Australia is just like the UK, people have different slang words in different states here, just like you'll get a Yorkshireman using different slang than an Aberdonian.  I've lived here over 30 years and never heard of greylead.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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13 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

You're in Perth, yes?  Is that what they say in Perth or just you sticking determinedly to the British words for them?

I’ve think people just use the word chips interchangeably here for chips and crisps. I must say I only use the word crisps with family...and pop. 

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When we had our UK extension I told the builders there were a load of cool drinks in the esky. They just gave me a blank look.

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Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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It gets confusing in my house. Chips are chips, but french fries are also chips, and hot chips are chips, but chips are crisps, except when they're dorritos but even then they're chips sometimes, not to mention potato chips. Now I'm confused again!

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:evilface_frowning_s

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