Jump to content
Cup Final 1973

Things I’d forgotten about the UK...

Recommended Posts

On 10/05/2021 at 16:47, Parley said:

When i was a kid, the top of the milk bottle was cream and I would try and drink that rather than let Mum shake it up in the milk.

I remember that if you didn't get up early enough to bring the milk bottles in from the front step, the blue tits would peck open the foil tops and drink the cream.

  • Like 1

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Red Rose said:

How good the salaries are in London.

I think that's a very good point.  I think  a lot of people move to Australia thinking they will be better off financially, and it's definitely not true for everyone nowadays.  I believe salaries are better in the medical field in Australia, but in the corporate world, people moving from the UK to Australia can find themselves taking a big hit in salary.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

I think that's a very good point.  I think  a lot of people move to Australia thinking they will be better off financially, and it's definitely not true for everyone nowadays.  I believe salaries are better in the medical field in Australia, but in the corporate world, people moving from the UK to Australia can find themselves taking a big hit in salary.

Not in IT they don’t 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

I think that's a very good point.  I think  a lot of people move to Australia thinking they will be better off financially, and it's definitely not true for everyone nowadays.  I believe salaries are better in the medical field in Australia, but in the corporate world, people moving from the UK to Australia can find themselves taking a big hit in salary.

100%

Here is another surprise for me about the UK, and of course all completely subjective, but I had forgotten how friendly you Brits are. Just back from my run and as per usual I got beaming smiles and hellos from complete strangers when I ran past. When I used to do that on the bay run in Sydney to strangers you'd get completely puzzled blank looks instead!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Red Rose said:

100%

Here is another surprise for me about the UK, and of course all completely subjective, but I had forgotten how friendly you Brits are. Just back from my run and as per usual I got beaming smiles and hellos from complete strangers when I ran past. When I used to do that on the bay run in Sydney to strangers you'd get completely puzzled blank looks instead!!

What racist clap trap.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

I want it all, and I want it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, Red Rose said:

100%

Here is another surprise for me about the UK, and of course all completely subjective, but I had forgotten how friendly you Brits are. Just back from my run and as per usual I got beaming smiles and hellos from complete strangers when I ran past. When I used to do that on the bay run in Sydney to strangers you'd get completely puzzled blank looks instead!!

When I do my walks around the village/across the countryside,  I always smile and say hello to people I come across. I wouldn’t walking through a busy town or city though as you’d be saying it constantly but in more rural settings it’s what people do.   In true British style, it’s often followed by a comment about the weather.  Maybe if your run in Australia was in a quieter setting you’d have had the same smiles.

Edited by Tulip1
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

When I do my walks around the village/across the countryside,  I always smile and say hello to people I come across. I wouldn’t walking through a busy town or city though as you’d be saying it constantly but in more rural settings it’s what people do.  In true British style, it’s often followed by a comment about the weather. 

Same happens here when i walk my dog every day.

 

  • Like 4

I want it all, and I want it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Parley said:

Same happens here when i walk my dog every day.

 

I’m sure it does.  In quieter areas it’s just what happens and I’ve no doubt it happens there just as it does here.  In busy areas it generally doesn’t happen which makes sense.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The implication that British people are friendly and Australians unfriendly is a bit offensive.

Most people the world over will smile and say hello if you give them a friendly greeting or smile.

  • Like 5

I want it all, and I want it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Parley said:

The implication that British people are friendly and Australians unfriendly is a bit offensive.

Most people the world over will smile and say hello if you give them a friendly greeting or smile.

I agree 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Parley said:

Same happens here when i walk my dog every day.

 

Same here. Much more than in England 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, HappyHeart said:

Same here. Much more than in England 

It’s not helpful to throw that sort of thing out.  Why can’t we just assume both countries are full of lovely friendly people.  Our countries are great friends,  is your ‘offensive’ second sentence really necessary.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I absolutely agree Tulip1.  I’m disappointed this has become a p###ing contest. My original post was never intended to imply one country was better than another; I was simply pointing out things I’d forgotten.

Adding to my list, after a dreadful car journey from Yorkshire to Warwick, I’d forgotten how fast and dense the traffic is on the motorway.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/05/2021 at 09:21, Cup Final 1973 said:

My phone deal is £5 a month ( half that for the first 3 months) unlimited calls and texts and 100 international minutes.  Not a lot of data though but I don’t play games or watch films on my phone.

I'm on £6 unlimited calls and texts, and I get a couple of gig data, but I usually use wi-fi. Don't get international calls, but I use signal, WhatsApp and messenger for most calls, local and international.


Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

I absolutely agree Tulip1.  I’m disappointed this has become a p###ing contest. My original post was never intended to imply one country was better than another; I was simply pointing out things I’d forgotten.

Adding to my list, after a dreadful car journey from Yorkshire to Warwick, I’d forgotten how fast and dense the traffic is on the motorway.

I think there is a difference between rural and urban living in most countries. I guess you don't tend to get the village life in Australia so much, but inner city and outer city have similar differences.

Funny, I was out walking a while ago, and I saw a couple who looked lost. They asked me for directions to the next village. I almost said that if they were heading there, then I wouldn't start from here. I had to stop myself. Life is a lot slower in the countryside and people have more time.

  • Like 2

Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

It’s not helpful to throw that sort of thing out.  Why can’t we just assume both countries are full of lovely friendly people.  Our countries are great friends,  is your ‘offensive’ second sentence really necessary.

My 'offensive' second sentence is entirely based on my families experiences comparing where we live now and where we lived then. We lived inner city. Socio economic deprived area...in comparison we moved to a similarly  regarded suburb here. What we could afford. Big difference. Don't slate me for stating my experience. 

Edited by HappyHeart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Red Rose said:

100%

Here is another surprise for me about the UK, and of course all completely subjective, but I had forgotten how friendly you Brits are. Just back from my run and as per usual I got beaming smiles and hellos from complete strangers when I ran past. When I used to do that on the bay run in Sydney to strangers you'd get completely puzzled blank looks instead!!

You tried to make this sound less offensive by saying "this is all completely subjective" but then you went on to make a blanket statement anyway - so it doesn't let you off the hook.

I am pleased to hear the people in your town/city/village are friendly and smiling.  However, you can't take that experience and assume it applies to the whole of Britain.

Likewise you can't take your experience of a suburb of Sydney and apply it to the whole of Australia.

My experience is the complete opposite,.  

  • Like 3

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

I’m sure it does.  In quieter areas it’s just what happens and I’ve no doubt it happens there just as it does here.  In busy areas it generally doesn’t happen which makes sense.  

We live in the 'quiet' end of town and most of the folk here always greet each other with a smile and a nod to the weather.  The serious runners are usually on the walking/bike tracks and it's just the odd one or two who smile and shout hello.  You will always get a person who never smiles or acknowledges other people.  I pass a man almost every day who never smiles or says good morning but who knows what is going on in his life.  He does look like a miserable down trodden soul.  At least he makes the effort to go for a walk most days.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

You tried to make this sound less offensive by saying "this is all completely subjective" but then you went on to make a blanket statement anyway - so it doesn't let you off the hook.

I am pleased to hear the people in your town/city/village are friendly and smiling.  However, you can't take that experience and assume it applies to the whole of Britain.

Likewise you can't take your experience of a suburb of Sydney and apply it to the whole of Australia.

My experience is the complete opposite,.  

Ahhhhh   .....................  the good old UK v Australia raises its head again.  Now it's the folk in the UK have  more friendly, smiley faces.  😂  I wonder what will be discussed next.  Hmmmm. 🤔

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Marisawright said:

You tried to make this sound less offensive by saying "this is all completely subjective" but then you went on to make a blanket statement anyway - so it doesn't let you off the hook.

I am pleased to hear the people in your town/city/village are friendly and smiling.  However, you can't take that experience and assume it applies to the whole of Britain.

Likewise you can't take your experience of a suburb of Sydney and apply it to the whole of Australia.

My experience is the complete opposite,.  

You’ll never convince the majority of poms that Australia isn’t ‘all the same’. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

I absolutely agree Tulip1.  I’m disappointed this has become a p###ing contest. My original post was never intended to imply one country was better than another; I was simply pointing out things I’d forgotten.

Adding to my list, after a dreadful car journey from Yorkshire to Warwick, I’d forgotten how fast and dense the traffic is on the motorway.

It doesn't take much for a thread to turn into a p###ing contest @Cup Final 1973.  Please don't let that put you off posting with your "things you had forgotten".  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I remember that if you didn't get up early enough to bring the milk bottles in from the front step, the blue tits would peck open the foil tops and drink the cream.

The last time I had home delivered milk was in Adelaide in the 1970's.  I went out  one morning to ...no milk.   Then discovered  that I'd put the empty milk bottles in the fridge the night before - and the alarm clock on the step. 🙄   The milkman must have thought "Blimey....we've got a right one 'ere!"

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me a delight to witness just how much people adore a sunny day. We had the fortune to be staying in Newcastle at the height of a heat wave. So many mentioned how transformed the city had become. One forgets such simple joys coming from a sunny climate with a lot of sun prevention. 

Same for London. First signs of sun and shirts off with office workers lapping up the rays. Again a transforming experience. In contrast to much of Australia  where the opposite tends to occur on very hot days. 

Another thing how great public transport is in most UK cities. A car was great for driving between places but a definite hinderance within cities. Rather delightful driving on UK roads outside of main centres, with such courteous drivers. 

People easy enough to chat with. It's not really possible to compare but generally found UK people more 'chatty'. Something different to friendliness. I suspect pretty similar on that level, neither being the most open of people. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As someone once said: "recollections may vary"

👑

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×