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LandM

I’m a teacher trainer

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Hi there PIO community

i have been a secondary teacher for 16y in the Uk, but 18m ago I became a ‘tutor’ on a PGCE course - training teachers. 
I intend on applying for the skilled visa (skilled independent visa, subclass 189) but does anyone know if my slight change to the focus of my job is a problem if I’m applying under ‘secondary school teacher’?

 

thanks for reading

lisa

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I thought you were going with your husband and if he can get a visa, you all go as dependents on his, you dont need to get a 189 of your own.  

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This is great to know - I thought we all had to get our own visas. 
if I’m a dependent - can I work once I’ve taken a year or so off to settle us all? Do you happen to know?

also, does it have implications for me - ie. do we have to then pay for our kids schooling, and pay the big medical amount of money when I arrive? Or will I (and the kids) have permanent residency too being a dependent of my husband who has that?

thanks for considering

 

lisa

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3 hours ago, LandM said:

This is great to know - I thought we all had to get our own visas. 
if I’m a dependent - can I work once I’ve taken a year or so off to settle us all? Do you happen to know?

also, does it have implications for me - ie. do we have to then pay for our kids schooling, and pay the big medical amount of money when I arrive? Or will I (and the kids) have permanent residency too being a dependent of my husband who has that?

thanks for considering

 

lisa

Secondary applicants get the same visa as the primary applicant. So, yes you will be able to work. 


____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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8 hours ago, LandM said:

This is great to know - I thought we all had to get our own visas. 
if I’m a dependent - can I work once I’ve taken a year or so off to settle us all? Do you happen to know?

also, does it have implications for me - ie. do we have to then pay for our kids schooling, and pay the big medical amount of money when I arrive? Or will I (and the kids) have permanent residency too being a dependent of my husband who has that?

thanks for considering

 

lisa

You may only have to pay for school fees if you go down the route of a temporary visa - which no one on here would recommend with a family BTW, not unless you plan on moving home at the end of it.  You may choose to get private health insurance if your DH is going to be earning a lot and you do it to avoid the Medicare surcharge but on a PR visa you will be covered by Medicare. It's not the NHS and it's designed as a co-pay system but Pommy migrants seem to insist that it must be free like the NHS and they hunt out bulk billing (free) practices.  If your OH has PR, you will have exactly the same. 

As for working, I assume you have 4 years teacher training at a Uni? That could be a first degree plus a Uni based PGCE (not an on the job training qual).  If you don't, then you won't get a job as a teacher no matter how long you may have been teaching overseas. Whether you get a job or not rather depends on where you live, what subjects you teach and whether there are any vacancies. Some states like you to do rural and remote positions before you get a look in at permanent positions - there is always a lot of competition for positions in places that people actually want to live in and they prioritise those who have done their regional work in offering permanent plum positions.  If you're maths/science though you'll have no problems 

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Posted (edited)
Quote

  If you're maths/science though you'll have no problems

Don't bet on it.

BA (statistics) BSc (physics) PhD (QED) B.Ed. (mathematics curriculum studies) not permitted to teach physics, because the last of these was not science. Being the sole parent of a handicapped child, could not go bush. Was supply teaching for 5 years ‘teaching’; Japanese, French, woodwork, mothercraft... 

At least one department requires applicants to agree to be posted anywhere, depending on the exigencies of the department.

Edited by wrussell

Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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13 hours ago, LandM said:

also, does it have implications for me - ie. do we have to then pay for our kids schooling, and pay the big medical amount of money when I arrive? Or will I (and the kids) have permanent residency too being a dependent of my husband who has that?

You will all be permanent residents. You can use the public health system straight away. You won't have to pay a big bill.

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Thank you- I was just checking that if only my husband got the visa and I his dependent whether I could work and benefit from Medicare. 
thabk you. 
I am a science teacher with a zoology degree, (3y) followed by a pgce and a masters in education from University College London (UCL). Thanks for all your responses on this and my other question threads, which I posted all at the same time yesterday ☺️
mall responses have been very helpful!!

👌🏼

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1 hour ago, LandM said:

Thank you- I was just checking that if only my husband got the visa and I his dependent whether I could work and benefit from Medicare. 

As I explained elsewhere, your husband applies as the main applicant and you and your children are included as dependents BUT when the visas are awarded, each of you gets your own independent permanent visa.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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