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Gaz59

Parent visa

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Hi does anyone have any idea how long our parent visa is likely to take to be processed, I logged  it in December 2017 thanks.

Gary

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As at February 2021, we have released for final processing: 

  • Contributory Parent visa applications with a queue date up to May 2016
  • Parent visa applications with a queue date up to September 2010
  • Aged Parent visa applications with a queue date up to December 2012”

____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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Yes I read that but I understand it's been stuck on may 2016 for ages, so on those dates I'm looking at around 18 months

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2 hours ago, Gaz59 said:

Yes I read that but I understand it's been stuck on may 2016 for ages, so on those dates I'm looking at around 18 months

No, I’d say you’re looking at about another 4 years, at least. 

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Thanks so just to clarify around 7 years in total

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1 hour ago, Gaz59 said:

Thanks so just to clarify around 7 years in total

Yes I’d say so.

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6 hours ago, Gaz59 said:

Yes I read that but I understand it's been stuck on may 2016 for ages, so on those dates I'm looking at around 18 months

Yes, because there was a massive spike of applications in 2016 which will take ages to get through


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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And that's  sub class 143 contributory visa 

Cheers Gary

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10 hours ago, Gaz59 said:

And that's  sub class 143 contributory visa 

Cheers Gary

Yes 

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Thanks I think I'll hang on and apply for the aged parent visa

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15 minutes ago, Gaz59 said:

Thanks I think I'll hang on and apply for the aged parent visa

You’ve stated you’ve already applied for the 143?

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Yes I no o can always cancel it can't I and apply on shore for aged parent visa

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51 minutes ago, Gaz59 said:

Yes I no o can always cancel it can't I and apply on shore for aged parent visa

Yes you can but be aware of the many pitfalls of spending the rest of your life on a bridging visa.

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Thanks for that information, I haven't looked into it in close  detail but would be greatful at some point if you could point out the pitfalls of that visa.

Regards

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24 minutes ago, Gaz59 said:

Thanks for that information, I haven't looked into it in close  detail but would be greatful at some point if you could point out the pitfalls of that visa.

Regards

Which one would you go for?


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I would definitely consider the 804 aged parent visa if  I had to wait  another 4 years  for the 143 parent visa, I assume it's less expensive, it just depends on the negatives of the visa, or can you work part time while waiting for the visa, and would you have to provide private medical cover.

 

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43 minutes ago, Gaz59 said:

I would definitely consider the 804 aged parent visa if  I had to wait  another 4 years  for the 143 parent visa, I assume it's less expensive, it just depends on the negatives of the visa, or can you work part time while waiting for the visa, and would you have to provide private medical cover.

 

Assuming you are already in Australia AND you were a legal resident of the UK before you arrived, then you will be covered by Medicare for most things.  Note, it's residency that counts not citizenship, so if you had retired to Spain or France before you moved, you won't be covered.  However, unlike Australian pensioners, you won't get cheap prescriptions.  As we age, most of us end up taking several medications, and just one medication can easily cost $30 a month.  Also remember that Medicare doesn't cover dentistry or spectacles.

If you want to buy a home, you'll be treated as a foreign investor. You'll have to apply for special permission to buy (from FIRB), for a fee of course.  Then you'll be charged a surcharge on top of the stamp duty.  On a $500,000 home, the surcharge is around $45,000.  

At some point after you apply, you'll have to pass a basic medical.   As the waiting time for the 804 is about 30 years, the good news is that you'll be dead before you have to pass the full medical so that's no problem.  

The other thing to consider, which I admit I don't know much about, is how being a temporary resident will impact you in your very old age. You won't be entitled to any of the benefits available to Australian pensioners including aged care.  You won't get the Australian state pension, but your British pension will be frozen at the rate it was when you arrived. In 20 years' time that won't be worth much.  Will you be able to afford to live?


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Thanks very helpful, would I be able to do casual work

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Gaz59 said:

Thanks very helpful, would I be able to do casual work

It depends on the conditions of your bridging visa.   I believe the bridging visa for the 804 doesn't normally allow you to work at all.  Of course, you could do cash-in-hand work but you'd be breaching the conditions of your visa and if found out, could potentially have your visa cancelled and be sent home.

One important point I missed:  if you decide to give it a try and then find, 10 or 15 years down the track, that you can't afford life in Australia, you'll have to go home and start all over again from scratch.  What's more, because you've ceased to be a UK resident, you won't be eligible for any welfare or aged care assistance in the UK straight away.  There are qualifying periods for some things, and being a citizen makes no difference.  So please, do your sums!

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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12 hours ago, Gaz59 said:

Thanks very helpful, would I be able to do casual work

I’m not sure but based on you’d be over 65 that may not be very easy anyway.  If you’re thinking of that visa (or bridging visa as you’ll never actually get the PR visa) you really need to be financially comfortable because you’ll never be able to access any state funding. It’s easy for us to think we won’t ever need it but the reality is many do as we are living longer. If you one day need to move to assisted living or a care home for example do you have a big bank balance that could sustain the high cost of that. If you haven’t you’re in trouble. That’s the sort of thing I meant by many pitfalls. As you’re in the 143 queue I’d be tempted to hang on and wait. You will have several years to wait still but once you get your PR your situation is much better than living on a bridging visa.   

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Tulip1 said:

I’m not sure but based on you’d be over 65 that may not be very easy anyway.  If you’re thinking of that visa (or bridging visa as you’ll never actually get the PR visa) you really need to be financially comfortable because you’ll never be able to access any state funding. It’s easy for us to think we won’t ever need it but the reality is many do as we are living longer. If you one day need to move to assisted living or a care home for example do you have a big bank balance that could sustain the high cost of that. If you haven’t you’re in trouble. That’s the sort of thing I meant by many pitfalls. As you’re in the 143 queue I’d be tempted to hang on and wait. You will have several years to wait still but once you get your PR your situation is much better than living on a bridging visa.   

Don’t forget that you still have to live here as PR for 10 years before you are eligible for any benefits, apart from Medicare.

Edited by ramot

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8 minutes ago, ramot said:

Don’t forget that you still have to live here as PR for 10 years before you are eligible for any benefits, apart from Medicare.

Yes that’s true but for parents arriving in their 50’s/60’s it would be comforting to know that when they’re much older there will be help if needed. Most needing expensive help are probably well into their 70’s or 80’s by which time they’re past the 10 year mark. Those living the rest of their life on a bridging visa will always have that possible worry. 

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23 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

Yes that’s true but for parents arriving in their 50’s/60’s it would be comforting to know that when they’re much older there will be help if needed. Most needing expensive help are probably well into their 70’s or 80’s by which time they’re past the 10 year mark. Those living the rest of their life on a bridging visa will always have that possible worry. 

Of course I realise that, it’s a very very worrying prospect being on a long long term bridging visa. We have experience of that worry, that’s why we went for PR when we were finally eligible, rather than stay on a temporary self funded long term visa, with no prospect of assistance, our choice so not complaining. it was purely a reminder, and fine if you are only in your 50’s & 60’s, but some parents are older.

 Help doesn’t come cheap here as you age, and it can take a long time to be assessed before you get a care package. Several friends, as in UK are almost full time carers here for their partners, with minimal hard fought assistance, which still costs them, on a care package.

The cost as in UK for retirement homes is frightening, with the need nerd to put down a very large deposit. 

So far we have gained nothing apart from Medicare, and apart from bulk billed GP’s we pay a good proportion of the cost to medical needs, but we did reach the safety net for cheap prescriptions last year, so had several months paying approximately $6 per script. You don’t obviously have to go private to see specialists, but hospital waiting lists are long, I think you officially have to be here 2 years PR before eligible for a seniors card? 

Having said the above, life is good here as you age, the older age group which we are in, do seem to really go out and enjoy life, and I am not knocking UK at all, but comparing our life to our Uk friends of a similar age, we socialise more, perhaps the Sunshine helps, but we should all live where life suits us.

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2 hours ago, ramot said:

I am not knocking UK at all, but comparing our life to our Uk friends of a similar age, we socialise more, perhaps the Sunshine helps, but we should all live where life suits us.

That was one of my main reasons for returning to Australia.   We got out and about and tried joining clubs etc in Southampton, but I was shocked at how sedentary and quiet they all were.  It was like once people hit 65, they put their cardigan and slippers on and didn't think much beyond the pub, the TV, and their holidays in Portugal or Spain.   I thought maybe it was just Soton, but my sisters and relatives in other parts of the UK were just the same.   

I'm sure there must be parts of the UK where retirees are active and socialise in the same way we do here, but for me it was such a relief to get back!

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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