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James Hallam

Contributory Parent Visa

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Hi everyone,

It's been a long time since I've been on here, I hope you can help with this questions.

I'm looking to get my parents on the above visa, however I'm just wondering about some of the requirements.

I've spent 2 years in Australia on a WHV and recently been granted a 189 skilled independent visa, at approximately 2 years and 3months post arrival.

Am I eligible to apply for my parents? Or do I need to have spend 2 years AS a permanent resident.

 

Thanks for all your help & support,

James

Edited by James Hallam

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I have no idea, but are you aware that there's a very long queue for contributory parent visas and the annual quota is very small?   If they applied today, the waiting period would be approx. 8 to 10 years.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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The other Parent visa is up to 30 years? Are there any instances where they accept at a significantly shorter time-frame?

Thanks Marisawright,

James

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The 143 is the quickest parent visa. Wait time is now approx 10 years. If your parents are over 65 they can look at another one which has a wait time of about 30 years but you can get a bridging visa that allows you to live in Australia whilst waiting. It comes with many disadvantages though. 

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On 23/02/2021 at 19:28, James Hallam said:

Or do I need to have spend 2 years AS a permanent resident

No ... settled is defined as  “lawfully resident in Australia for a reasonable period”. The reasonable period is generally considered to be 2 years and you can hold any visa, as long as you were ‘lawful’. 

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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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4 hours ago, James Hallam said:

The other Parent visa is up to 30 years? Are there any instances where they accept at a significantly shorter time-frame?

No, there isn't.  In fact, the government wants to get rid of it, but couldn't get it through parliament, so they've just made the waiting time impossible instead.  

The government did some research which showed that parent visas are costing them a fortune.  Parents come to Australia late in life so they don't work for long, and therefore don't contribute much tax - yet they're entitled to full Medicare, aged care, pensioner benefits etc. until they die, the same as someone who worked and paid tax in Australia all their life.  That's why the contributory visa fee is so high, and yet they've calculated it's not nearly enough (it needs to be at least double).  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

No, there isn't.  In fact, the government wants to get rid of it, but couldn't get it through parliament, so they've just made the waiting time impossible instead.  

The government did some research which showed that parent visas are costing them a fortune.  Parents come to Australia late in life so they don't work for long, and therefore don't contribute much tax - yet they're entitled to full Medicare, aged care, pensioner benefits etc. until they die, the same as someone who worked and paid tax in Australia all their life.  That's why the contributory visa fee is so high, and yet they've calculated it's not nearly enough (it needs to be at least double).  

Marisa apart from Medicare, I think you have to wait 10 years from the date of your visa before you are entitled to any other benefits?  Please let me know if you know anything different.

I do agree that us oldies will cost the country, but some of us actually do pay a fair amount of tax, ok probably a minority but we aren’t all broke, so agree on balance it doesn’t even out, but it’s better than nothing.

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53 minutes ago, ramot said:

Marisa apart from Medicare, I think you have to wait 10 years from the date of your visa before you are entitled to any other benefits?  Please let me know if you know anything different.

I do agree that us oldies will cost the country, but some of us actually do pay a fair amount of tax

I'm not having a go at anyone.  I'm just pointing out why the government is making life difficult for parent visa applicants and why that's not likely to change.  I think you're right about the 10 years, but if someone arrives at 60 and then gets benefits at 70, that can still be a considerable amount of time that they're eligible.  And it's the Medicare costs, which happen from first arrival, that really cost.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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20 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

I'm not having a go at anyone.  I'm just pointing out why the government is making life difficult for parent visa applicants and why that's not likely to change.  I think you're right about the 10 years, but if someone arrives at 60 and then gets benefits at 70, that can still be a considerable amount of time that they're eligible.  And it's the Medicare costs, which happen from first arrival, that really cost.  

Never said you were having a go. I just get a bit fed up with the general insinuation that all of us on the parent visa come here with little or no funds. Wether we all end up costing the country a fortune is irrelevant , as we come here on a visa offered by the government for older people, we shouldn’t be blamed for our eventual cost. At the moment until the government cuts back more or discontinues the parent visa, we have the right to be here, even if we end up costing the country a fortune.

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5 minutes ago, ramot said:

I just get a bit fed up with the general insinuation that all of us on the parent visa come here with little or no funds.

I haven't seen anyone make that insinuation here.   People who have arrived legally on a visa offered by the government have every right to be here and I don't begrudge them anything.

When I make comments about the cost, it's in response to people who are complaining that the government is being unreasonable. Particularly children who protest that because they're living and working in Australia, their taxes somehow pay for their parents (whereas as we know, their taxes pay for their kids' welfare and education, and for their own old age).  Then there are those who do acknowledge the parents are an extra cost, but after all, they've done Australia such a great favour by deigning to bring their business or professional skills to the country, taxpayers should be willing to bear the cost.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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