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Australian and UK Covid Responses

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12 minutes ago, Cup Final 1973 said:

Isn’t Pfizer given to everyone in the USA?

I think it depends on the State. My brother had Pfizer but also had the option of Moderna.

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8 minutes ago, Drumbeat said:

I think it depends on the State. My brother had Pfizer but also had the option of Moderna.

I think some also get Johnson & Johnson 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 hours ago, Parley said:

You're not eligible to get Pfizer if you are over 50.

Unless you are Annastacia Palaszczuk.

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23 hours ago, unzippy said:

But there is "evidence"! 

There's at least 3 in this thread that have believed it with their own eyes🤣

Is that a "conspiracy side of things" as well?

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1 minute ago, Dusty Plains said:

Is that a "conspiracy side of things" as well?

I hope not as if this thread goes down the conspiracy line it will be closed.

 Cal x


If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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13 hours ago, Parley said:

Victoria has managed it well. No new cases today. And the only covid related deaths are from the vaccine.

The country will continue to manage outbreaks for the next year. In 6 months time there will be enough Pfizer for everyone.

Catching covid does not mean you are going to die Marisa. As Scott Morrison said for most people it is a mild disease. For 2% it can be very serious

I might be the only one, but long-covid concerns me far more than dying.

 

Firstly, the best estimate of statistics suggest 0.5%-1% of covid cases result in death whereas a recent Office of National Statistics report in the UK showed that 13.7% of a 20,000 person sample group continued to experience symptoms for at least 12 weeks.   So there's far more chance of long Covid than dying of it.

Secondly, if I'm dead, well...it's game over and I'll not be aware of it.  But these long, lingering symptoms that drastically reduce quality of life - I hate that idea.  We've all got limited time left on this Earth and we want to enjoy as much of it was we can, not be burdened with chronic illness that stops us living well.

 

 

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British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

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15 hours ago, Parley said:

Actually I think in the last 6 months in Australia there have been more deaths from the vaccination than from the disease.

But I will be getting vaccinated by the end of the year as will most people in Australia.

That’s an interesting point Parley. I hadn’t thought about it that way and do understand people weighing up their individual risks before proceeding. I was thinking (and making comparisons) around what will happen when borders eventually open and the population is exposed to covid, whenever that happens.

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11 hours ago, MacGyver said:

That’s an interesting point Parley. I hadn’t thought about it that way and do understand people weighing up their individual risks before proceeding. I was thinking (and making comparisons) around what will happen when borders eventually open and the population is exposed to covid, whenever that happens.

That is precisely the present problem.  We have people who can't wait to get the borders reopened, whether it be for commerce, compassionate reasons, or whatever.  On the other hand we have people who have no interest in seeing the borders reopened, they may in fact quite like the fact that the migration tap has been sealed shut.

We are now asking for everyone in the second group to take a hit for the team to reopen the borders, possibly at risk of death or injury, is this really fair?

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58 minutes ago, rtritudr said:

That is precisely the present problem.  We have people who can't wait to get the borders reopened, whether it be for commerce, compassionate reasons, or whatever.  On the other hand we have people who have no interest in seeing the borders reopened, they may in fact quite like the fact that the migration tap has been sealed shut.

We are now asking for everyone in the second group to take a hit for the team to reopen the borders, possibly at risk of death or injury, is this really fair?

I think it is, because they are being selfish and blinkered.  Just because the closed borders don't affect their job or their income, they're quite happy to let the universities and the tourist industry collapse and farm produce rot in the fields.  Just because they've got no family overseas, they're quite happy for others to be separated from their loved ones.   A case of "I'm all right Jack".

Besides, we're not asking them to take a hit.  We're asking them to be grown-ups and stop being scared of an injection.

I am all in favour of the closed borders right now.  They have done a grand job.  But we should be making strenuous efforts to find a way to open them safely as soon as possible, for the sake of the country's economy if nothing else.  Vaccination is the only route we have.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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19 hours ago, Drumbeat said:

I think it depends on the State. My brother had Pfizer but also had the option of Moderna.

My brother is in California. I think he said he got Moderna.

Strictly speaking he was not eligible at the time he got it, but he said at their mass vaccination places you had to state you were in a high risk group but they didn't actually verify then.

Now it is pretty much open to everyone over there. I think they have just approved teenagers to get vaccinated.


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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

I think it is, because they are being selfish and blinkered.  Just because the closed borders don't affect their job or their income, they're quite happy to let the universities and the tourist industry collapse and farm produce rot in the fields.  Just because they've got no family overseas, they're quite happy for others to be separated from their loved ones.   A case of "I'm all right Jack".

Besides, we're not asking them to take a hit.  We're asking them to be grown-ups and stop being scared of an injection.

I am all in favour of the closed borders right now.  They have done a grand job.  But we should be making strenuous efforts to find a way to open them safely as soon as possible, for the sake of the country's economy if nothing else.  Vaccination is the only route we have.

As I've pointed out before, what we do is only half of the puzzle. The other countries is the other half.

As per discussions with Singapore, they advised the majority of our population need to be vaccinated, and we said the same to them before any new travel bubble is introduced.

For our travel bubble with the UK it will be the same. High vaccination rates in both cases and low numbers of cases.

Your utopia where we throw open the borders to all and sundry again is many years away. There will be a few years first of targetted bubbles with key low risk countries.

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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32 minutes ago, Parley said:

Your utopia where we throw open the borders to all and sundry again is many years away. There will be a few years first of targetted bubbles with key low risk countries.

Who said anything about opening the borders to all and sundry?  I'm talking about opening borders in a SAFE manner, which is going to mean controls and travel bubbles at first. I thought that was so bleeding obvious it didn't need saying.

But we can't even start creating those until we've got large numbers vaccinated.   Large numbers of people delaying or refusing to get vaccinated means it's going to take far longer than it should.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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23 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

Long Covid is very real and scary and more and more about it is coming out. I spoke to a neighbour the other day and his brother had Covid last October.  The brother is late 40’s fit and heathy but it hit him hard. A few weeks afterwards though he started feeling a bit better day after day and thought thank god I’m through that. That feeling a bit better never got to feeling properly ok though and eight months on he has long Covid. He’s still very short of breath, lungs quite knackered, he’s a different person than the one he was.  Doctors can’t tell him if he will ever make a full recovery, they just don’t know.  My neighbour said his brother was very fit and healthy, did lots of sports, ate well, didn’t smoke etc.  Covid takes prisoners from all walks of life although of course the younger you are the less change of a bad outcome.  The 2% chance of dying is low although far higher than the chance of dying of a clot.  That 2% would  be higher if it was measuring those that survived but are impaired, people like my neighbours brother aren’t measured but are real.  I have spoken to several over the last year with long Covid,  it’s not nice.  One I see regularly sounds like they have late stage COPD.  They haven’t, they have long Covid. They cannot even finish a sentence without a gasp.   For me, I feel grateful to have been double jabbed.  Even if I was to catch Covid which is very unlikely, I’d get a far milder illness.  I see Israel are doing more testing into Pfizer and heart related side effects. I’ve not read much into it as it doesn’t effect me but I don’t think any vaccine will come out of this as perfect, time will tell.  It is all about choice for people though, I respect that. 

375000 people have long covid in the UK.

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Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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50 minutes ago, newjez said:

375000 people have long covid in the UK.

Don't think anyone knows about that in Australia. Could scare people into avoiding vaccination even more.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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3 minutes ago, Parley said:

Don't think anyone knows about that in Australia. Could scare people into avoiding vaccination even more.

How so?  That seems counter intuitive. 


British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

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Just now, FirstWorldProblems said:

How so?  That seems counter intuitive. 

Newjez posted that anyone who has had covid previously and recovered, and later gets vaccinated against covid can end up with "long covid". 

Unless I misunderstood him, which is possible.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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5 minutes ago, Parley said:

Newjez posted that anyone who has had covid previously and recovered, and later gets vaccinated against covid can end up with "long covid". 

Unless I misunderstood him, which is possible.

I read an article on the BBC news site where they are finding people with long Covid were improving after receiving the vacccine.

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3 minutes ago, Drumbeat said:

I read an article on the BBC news site where they are finding people with long Covid were improving after receiving the vacccine.

Yes I’ve seen those reports.  There were studies posted last month (not yet peer reviewed) indicating more than 50% long Covid sufferers saw improvement post vaccine. 
 

hopefully soon we will see a study showing vaccinated people drastically less likely to get long Covid. 

Edited by FirstWorldProblems
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British  | Lived in Australia 2001-02 on 457   | Married Aussie wife & moved back to UK | Plan to return to Sydney 2026 when all kids have finished school

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9 hours ago, Parley said:

Newjez posted that anyone who has had covid previously and recovered, and later gets vaccinated against covid can end up with "long covid". 

Unless I misunderstood him, which is possible.

I think it's a pretty rare side effect, but even so, it's better to get vaccinated and avoid covid completely.


Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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21 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I think it is, because they are being selfish and blinkered.  Just because the closed borders don't affect their job or their income, they're quite happy to let the universities and the tourist industry collapse and farm produce rot in the fields.  Just because they've got no family overseas, they're quite happy for others to be separated from their loved ones.   A case of "I'm all right Jack".

Besides, we're not asking them to take a hit.  We're asking them to be grown-ups and stop being scared of an injection.

I am all in favour of the closed borders right now.  They have done a grand job.  But we should be making strenuous efforts to find a way to open them safely as soon as possible, for the sake of the country's economy if nothing else.  Vaccination is the only route we have.

1. Sure, I totally agree with your points on the benefits of opening the border.  I am just playing the devil's advocate here.

2. I think we *are* asking them to take a hit though.  The blood clot issue is real and people have died as a result.  Sure it's not a huge death rate but think of it from their point-of-view.  If we didn't have to open the borders then they wouldn't have to take this risk so they are doing this purely (or mostly if you include the risk from quarantine leaks but experience has shown that to be manageable) for the benefit of others.

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7 hours ago, rtritudr said:

1. Sure, I totally agree with your points on the benefits of opening the border.  I am just playing the devil's advocate here.

2. I think we *are* asking them to take a hit though.  The blood clot issue is real and people have died as a result.  Sure it's not a huge death rate but think of it from their point-of-view.  If we didn't have to open the borders then they wouldn't have to take this risk so they are doing this purely (or mostly if you include the risk from quarantine leaks but experience has shown that to be manageable) for the benefit of others.

And for the benefit of themselves I’d imagine. I have many hopes of travelling to lots of places in the world still and I’m sure most Australians feel exactly as I do.  They may not mind staying put for a few years due to this pandemic, we’ve all had to but the thought of never being able to travel outside your country isn’t a nice thought regardless of how much you love your country.  Travel is wonderful and a favourite pastime of many.  Sure them having the vaccine will benefit others as that will lead to borders opening up but those same open borders will lead to them being able to resume travel themselves too.  It’s a wonderful world and life, vaccines are the key to making the most of both. 

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On 12/06/2021 at 17:16, Parley said:

Newjez posted that anyone who has had covid previously and recovered, and later gets vaccinated against covid can end up with "long covid". 

Unless I misunderstood him, which is possible.

Yes you did, @Parley.  Long Covid is what people can get after they've recovered from the main infection.  You can be left with "ground glass" in your lungs, heart muscle inflammation, or brain damage.  Sometimes it lasts for a few weeks or months, but some people are still suffering months later and no one knows if or when they will improve.

As newjez posted, 375,000 people have Long Covid in the UK which isn't a huge number when you think how many people were infected there.  But it's still a risk.

It looks as though the vaccine might help people who suffer from Long Covid, too.  Let's hope so.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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8 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Yes you did, @Parley.  Long Covid is what people can get after they've recovered from the main infection.  You can be left with "ground glass" in your lungs, heart muscle inflammation, or brain damage.  Sometimes it lasts for a few weeks or months, but some people are still suffering months later and no one knows if or when they will improve.

As newjez posted, 375,000 people have Long Covid in the UK which isn't a huge number when you think how many people were infected there.  But it's still a risk.

It looks as though the vaccine might help people who suffer from Long Covid, too.  Let's hope so.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19

 

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

Yes you did, @Parley.  Long Covid is what people can get after they've recovered from the main infection.  You can be left with "ground glass" in your lungs, heart muscle inflammation, or brain damage.  Sometimes it lasts for a few weeks or months, but some people are still suffering months later and no one knows if or when they will improve.

As newjez posted, 375,000 people have Long Covid in the UK which isn't a huge number when you think how many people were infected there.  But it's still a risk.

It looks as though the vaccine might help people who suffer from Long Covid, too.  Let's hope so.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19

Did you read his post where he stated that people are catching it from the vaccine ?

How did i misunderstand that ?

Edited by Parley

I want it all, and I want it now.

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16 minutes ago, Parley said:

Did you read his post where he stated that people are catching it from the vaccine ?

How did i misunderstand that ?

What newjez said was, "It seems to happen when someone who has had covid takes the vaccine".    That is a different thing from the usual "long covid" which people get immediately after having covid.  Newjez's post is the first I've ever heard of it.    But the point is, that's someone who already had covid and then the vaccine is triggering some kind of relapse.  Not good news but not an issue for someone who''s never had Covid in the first place.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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