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Lou1584

Child partially sighted - confirming visa would certainly be rejected?

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Hi, myself, husband and two boys planned on applying for a PR visa after falling in love with Brisbane. We live in the UK. 

However it seems this particular dream will not be possible. My son, 5, is registered partially sighted. No other health issues, attending mainstream school but does get educational support for this. It seems we would most definitely be rejected for a PR visa because of this regardless of our skills etc. 

Guess I'm looking for someone to confirm it? Then I'll cry.

Thank you, Lou

 

 

 

 

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Will her condition deteriorate as she gets older?


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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His vision is likely to be static but doctor can't say for certain. Because he is registered partially sighted he is entitled to disability allowance. It's such a blow to read because of his vision we'll not likely to be able to live in Australia. He's a healthy, clever boy and his vision never holds him back! 

But can't see how we'll successfully get a visa.

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1 hour ago, Lou1584 said:

His vision is likely to be static but doctor can't say for certain. Because he is registered partially sighted he is entitled to disability allowance. It's such a blow to read because of his vision we'll not likely to be able to live in Australia. He's a healthy, clever boy and his vision never holds him back! 

But can't see how we'll successfully get a visa.

Book a consultation with George Lombard.  He's an agent who specialises in applications with medical issues, so he will know whether there's a chance or not. 

https://austimmigration.com.au/

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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@Lou1584 my heart goes out to you. I genuinely beleieve if you put your mind to it you can achieve this. I have seen some posters more interested in what they can gain, or sneak in through the back door crying Australia now owes them. You are just after a better life for your family (aren't we all 🙂), and sound genuinely sincere with your messages. 

(I think there are health waivers, but again best advice is to seek professional advice)

Not is all lost 👍

Keep us posted. All the best. 

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It all depends on the level of support he requires - as soon as he starts to need significant assistive technology or braille if they still do it, plus mobility training etc etc the costs he would incur to the Australian tax payer will mount up and, yes, you are likely to get rejected.  Talk to George Lombard or any of the other agents who specialise in medical conditions but usually as soon as a kid gets additional in school support they are likely to fail unfortunately.

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Thank you all for your replies. I'll book a call with George Lampard before I completely give up on the dream.

@Southlander kind words 🙂 I will keep you posted. We would like to live, work and love life down under! 

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I would've thought you'd be able to find a way if you get a well drafted medical report. Being partially sighted isn't actually super expensive to support is it? I mean, it's not something that is going to cost 10s of thousands year on year on year like a complex medical condition might do? There's another migration agent on here who is highly recommended for medical problems with visas - have a flick though and find them too. Always worth getting a few opinions on things like this.

All the best with it. Very hard dealing with things like this and make sure you and your husband have good support too - we often forget to look after each other when focussing on our kids.

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1 hour ago, DrDougster said:

I would've thought you'd be able to find a way if you get a well drafted medical report. Being partially sighted isn't actually super expensive to support is it? I mean, it's not something that is going to cost 10s of thousands year on year on year like a complex medical condition might do? There's another migration agent on here who is highly recommended for medical problems with visas - have a flick though and find them too. Always worth getting a few opinions on things like this.

All the best with it. Very hard dealing with things like this and make sure you and your husband have good support too - we often forget to look after each other when focussing on our kids.

It sounds like there will be significant costs.   Not perhaps medically but the OP has said their child has extra support at school and gets disability allowance. It’s likely those things will be needed in Australia too and they certainly would run into many thousands of dollars.  They definitely should use an agent to give themselves the best chance, fingers crossed for them. 

Edited by Tulip1

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4 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

It sounds like there will be significant costs.   Not perhaps medically but the OP has said their child has extra support at school and gets disability allowance. It’s likely those things will be needed in Australia too and they certainly would run into many thousands of dollars.  They definitely should use an agent to give themselves the best chance, fingers crossed for them. 

From previous posts by agents it appears the important thing is to get a well written report. The costs need to be pretty high for it to be a straight no and I'd be surprised if being partially sighted would be a straight no on this basis as it's not an incredibly costly impairment for which to address handicaps.

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I am getting advice after the helpful signposting on here. Medical cost are minimal but I understand that because he has a statement at school this is costly to the system. 

I can see it from both sides. It seems deeply harsh so essentially punish someone for their disability. But equally there isn't a bottomless pit of money, and Australias policy is essentially there to protect it's citizens. When your on the receiving end though it's so sad xx

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They also consider access to services as well as cost. There are limited school support resources in many areas and they consider these should not be stretched unnecessarily. 
 

It doesn’t discriminate against the disability per se.  Blind adults can obtain visas if they can show they will not be a burden, easier to do when you have a job etc........

I know it doesn’t help much in your case.

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8 hours ago, rammygirl said:

They also consider access to services as well as cost. There are limited school support resources in many areas and they consider these should not be stretched unnecessarily. 
 

It doesn’t discriminate against the disability per se.  Blind adults can obtain visas if they can show they will not be a burden, easier to do when you have a job etc........

I know it doesn’t help much in your case.

Precisely, it is the cost of support services in education which mount up (rapidly, unfortunately).  I used to help with the VI services here in a previous life and the level of support the VI kids received was substantial and if you factor in just an STA at $40kpa ball park, even for 50% support (which isnt unusual for a beginning learner) that's a lot of money being spent on one child.  Obviously, early intervention is vital as educational skills are being established, alternatives being developed and accessed etc.  Our budget was very significant for a relatively small VI population.  I agree, it is unfortunate but it is what it is and if you know what is likely to occur then you make your decisions accordingly.

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32 minutes ago, Quoll said:

Precisely, it is the cost of support services in education which mount up (rapidly, unfortunately).  I used to help with the VI services here in a previous life and the level of support the VI kids received was substantial and if you factor in just an STA at $40kpa ball park, even for 50% support (which isnt unusual for a beginning learner) that's a lot of money being spent on one child.  Obviously, early intervention is vital as educational skills are being established, alternatives being developed and accessed etc.  Our budget was very significant for a relatively small VI population.  I agree, it is unfortunate but it is what it is and if you know what is likely to occur then you make your decisions accordingly.

I agree and the OP has also said the child gets disability allowance. They’d therefore likely be awarded it’s equivalent in Australia too. A lifetime of that will be costly on the Australian taxpayers. The OP has said whilst the vision is likely to be static, doctors can’t say the certain it won’t worsen.  It will be a great shame for the OP if the visa is declined but they cannot fail to understand why if so. It’s nothing to do with punishing people and I’m sure they know that really.  They are just understandably worried they will get turned down.  I have a friend who has a daughter with high special needs. She’s an adult now but when she was a child my friend and her husband looked into moving to Australia. His job was on the skilled list but it would have failed because their daughter needed special education and other things and the costs of that was very high. They were disappointed but 100% understood.  There could be no blame, it was just the way it was.  The idea was put to bed and that was it.  
@DrDougster, it’s not just the cost of the impairment in medical needs, it’s all the associated costs too. 
 

 Hope things work out for the OP. 

Edited by Tulip1
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4 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

I agree and the OP has also said the child gets disability allowance. They’d therefore likely be awarded it’s equivalent in Australia too. A lifetime of that will be costly on the Australian taxpayers. The OP has said whilst the vision is likely to be static, doctors can’t say the certain it won’t worsen.  It will be a great shame for the OP if the visa is declined but they cannot fail to understand why if so. It’s nothing to do with punishing people and I’m sure they know that really.  They are just understandably worried they will get turned down.  I have a friend who has a daughter with high special needs. She’s an adult now but when she was a child my friend and her husband looked into moving to Australia. His job was on the skilled list but it would have failed because their daughter needed special education and other things and the costs of that was very high. They were disappointed but 100% understood.  There could be no blame, it was just the way it was.  The idea was put to bed and that was it.  
@DrDougster, it’s not just the cost of the impairment in medical needs, it’s all the associated costs too. 
 

 Hope things work out for the OP. 

Yes, obviously the impairment has its associated disabilities and handicaps which may be costly. But, to be able to be in a mainstream school with support and not to be held back would suggest that these may not be insurmountable.

As all have suggested - a specialist in medical cases would certainly be the best person to consult with for knowledgeable advice and a potential application with a well prepared report.

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9 hours ago, DrDougster said:

Yes, obviously the impairment has its associated disabilities and handicaps which may be costly. But, to be able to be in a mainstream school with support and not to be held back would suggest that these may not be insurmountable.

As all have suggested - a specialist in medical cases would certainly be the best person to consult with for knowledgeable advice and a potential application with a well prepared report.

I think currently that significant cost is estimated at $49,000 over 5 years.  If the condition is permanent then the cost is considered over a 10 year period (if i've read the website right). The cost is estimated against medical and community services that may be required.

The other issue for the OP is that the support services on arriving in Aus may not necessarily be forthcoming very easily, and pensions will need to be applied for and not transferred.  Funding can be notoriously difficult, a colleague who has a severely autistic son had had her NDIS funding reduced every year

 

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1 hour ago, ali said:

I think currently that significant cost is estimated at $49,000 over 5 years.  If the condition is permanent then the cost is considered over a 10 year period (if i've read the website right). The cost is estimated against medical and community services that may be required.

The other issue for the OP is that the support services on arriving in Aus may not necessarily be forthcoming very easily, and pensions will need to be applied for and not transferred.  Funding can be notoriously difficult, a colleague who has a severely autistic son had had her NDIS funding reduced every year

 

NDIS is a complete nightmare for patients in my experience of it.

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10 hours ago, DrDougster said:

NDIS is a complete nightmare for patients in my experience of it.

I could weep for my colleague, her son has the mental age of a 5 year old and they thought that he could get two buses to school and were going to withdraw his travel funding.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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